PC Gamer

When Mark Morris and Chris Delay of Introversion Software began working on Prison Architect, they knew it was a game that would stir controversy. They never expected, however, that a simulator about the incarceration of cute, blobby humans had the potential to make them criminals themselves. Their crime? Displaying a tiny, five-pixel wide red cross on the hood of the ambulances and backpacks of paramedics. It might sound laughable, but it just so happens that those five pixels arranged just so are an internationally protected symbol.

Days before Christmas, Delay and Morris received a concerning email from the British Red Cross.

"My immediate reason for writing is that it has been brought to our attention that in your game ‘Prison Architect’ a red cross emblem is displayed on vehicles," it reads. "Those responsible may be unaware that use of the red cross emblem is restricted under the Geneva Conventions for the Protection of War Victims of 12 August 1949, and that unauthorised use of this sign in the United Kingdom is an offence under the Geneva Conventions Act 1957."

Delay and Morris didn't know it, but for years they had been breaking the law—a very serious sounding one at that. "We actually thought we were being spoofed by somebody and that this couldn't possibly be real," Delay tells me. But, to their amusement (and anger), it was.

Delay and Morris, like many of us, had made a common mistake. "In my mind that the red cross is the universal symbol for health packs and health add-ons—anything to do with healing in videogames," Delay says. "I'm sure there are red crosses on Doom health packs from 20 years ago." And while he's right about Doom, he was wrong about the red cross. 

That tiny little red cross on the hood of the ambulance is where Delay and Morris went wrong.

More than just a health pack 

See, the red cross doesn't belong to the public domain. It's the protected emblem of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), an organization that dates back to the 1863. The ICRC was critical in establishing human rights during wartime as laid out in the Geneva Conventions that 196 countries have since agreed to abide by. For the average person, these conventions are usually understood as "don't harm prisoners, the wounded, and the people who are just trying to help them." For the ICRC and its various child-organizations around the world, that mission is a lot more complicated—especially when it comes to their emblem.

"The reason for this strict control is that the red cross emblem is an internationally agreed symbol of protection during armed conflicts," the email continues. "It is used to safeguard the wounded and sick and those who seek to help them in a totally neutral and impartial way, and can save lives."

Originally, laws prohibiting the misuse of the red cross emblem were used to prevent armed forces from exploiting it to gain a tactical advantage. In 2008, one such instance occurred when Colombian intelligence forces posed as members of the Red Cross to save political prisoners who had been held for years by FARC rebels. Doing so is a war crime. But is there really no difference between a tiny red cross on a videogame ambulance and one used to misrepresent military personnel in combat?

"If the red cross emblem or similar signs are used for other purposes, no matter how beneficial or inconsequential they may seem, the special significance of the emblem will be diminished," the email reads. "The red cross emblem or similar designs are not general signs of ambulances, health care, first aid, the nursing or medical profession, or similar matters. Moreover, they are not signs to be used for commercial purposes, such as for advertising campaigns or on products." 

Health packs in Halo: Combat Evolved used the red cross but were changed to a red 'H' for Halo 2.

Yet the use of the red cross for just those reasons is common. A Google search for 'health pack' returns dozens of results for everything from Doom to Halo. Outside of videogames, it appears in comic books, movies, and even theater. With misuse of the symbol so apparently widespread, Delay tells me he was a bit upset to find that Prison Architect had been one instance where the hammer would fall.

"Red crosses are such a minor five-pixel wide symbol in Prison Architect," he argues. "There's one on the ambulance and one on the back of a health pack. They are so tiny. I think it's ridiculous. It's not like we had these enormous red crosses everywhere on the sides of vans in war zones. It's this miniscule pixelated red cross you can barely make out."

But Introversion Software isn't the first developer to draw the attention of a Red Cross organization, either. In 2006, the David Pratt of the Canadian Red Cross sent a letter to a law firm representing several game developers urging them to stop using the symbol in their games. "Our philosophy is that there's no emblem abuse that's too small to report, because you have to try to get them all, which is a practically impossible task—but one thing we saw with the videogames industry is that it has a huge reach, especially with young people," Pratt said in an interview with Shacknews. "It may create an impression that the red cross emblem is part of the public domain."

On the surface, this sounds like a typical case of enforcing the misuse of a trademark—the kind that videogames have been dealing with for decades. Except that the Red Cross isn't a business where misuse of their logo might result in financial harm. According to an article published by the Canadian Red Cross, it's that misuse of the emblem could lead to physical harm. 

The red cross appeared in Doom but was later changed with the re-release to a red pill..

The real issue, at least where Delay and Morris live, seems to have more serious consequences than just being sued. In the United Kingdom, the provisions of the Geneva Conventions were incorporated into British law in 1957. Prison Architect's misuse of the emblem wasn't just breaking the Geneva Conventions (which feels kind of like some distant bogeyman), but the laws of their own country. That's why, upon getting the email, they were quick to comply. Boot up Prison Architect and call in some paramedics, and you'll no longer see that red cross. Now it's green. Delay tells me the change took seconds to make in Photoshop. "It's not worth taking the stand," Morris says. "You have to pick your battles." 

Drawing the line 

While both developers recognize that the red cross can be an important symbol in the right context, they can't help but raise their eyebrows at the fact that a charitable organization is spending its donated resources to cracking down on indie game developers.

"Lots of people donate money and the assumption is that that money is going to treating [people in need] and it turns out that a portion of that money is going to lawyers writing letters to videogame companies who are apparently abusing use of the red cross symbol," Morris says. "How much money do they spend every year enforcing their abuse of the red cross emblem? We are one videogame out of thousands, so many of which use that emblem to indicate health. Do they just cherry pick the odd person to approach? In which case, it would feel like a complete waste of time to spend any money at all, if you're not going to enforce it consistently. If they were spending large amounts of money to persistently and consistently enforce ownership of their red cross around the world in industries that are completely unrelated, is that a legitimate use of money for a charitable organization?"

Is the supposed dilution of the red cross' important meaning really of such importance? Internet activist, journalist, and author Cory Doctorow doesn't think so. "Is there any question that the use of red crosses to denote health packs in games will bring even the most minute quantum of harm to the Red Cross?" he wrote in a blog post criticizing Pratt's letter. Doctorow reached out to the Canadian Red Cross for comment and they appear to not have responded. 

Medics in Half-Life 2 also bear the red cross.

On a broader spectrum, various Red Cross organizations have come under scrutiny for how they choose to spend their money and the lack of disclosure that can sometimes go along with it. While there's no denying that the mission of the Red Cross is noble, how efficiently it goes about it is contentious. "When you're a charity, you need to talk about these things I think," Morris says. "People donate, and I really believe that you have an obligation to tell people where the money is spent."

For Morris, who tells me he's donated to the British Red Cross, the situation has an interesting wrinkle: Some tiny sliver of his own charitable givings has fueled the action taken against him. "I'm not saying I'm going to stop, but until I get some kind of understanding of how much of my money they're using to pursue infringement claims, I'm starting to think, maybe they've got a little bit more money than they need?"

For a game that has a history of spawning thought-provoking discussions, this latest development was never intended, but Morris and Delay see it as just another day at the office. "This is just the latest fascinating twist and turn. That's what's really interesting about it, Prison Architect gets people talking," Delay says. Now that the issue is settled, both developers are relatively good-humored about the experience.

"I think of myself giving an after dinner speech on my 70th birthday and talking about everything I've achieved in my life, and one of them will be my war criminal status," Morris jokes.

"That's not exactly a list you want to be on," Delay fires back.

But, among their jokes, one question still needs an answer: Is a little red cross really worth the trouble?

We've reached out to the British Red Cross for comment and will update this story should they reply. 

Community Announcements - John
Today we release Update 11f to the default branch. New in this release:

Staff Needs - Guards now experience a similar set of needs to prisoners, for example they get hungry and need to go to the toilet. You can enable this option when creating a new prison, or in the Extras | Map Settings menu for existing prisons.

Click here for a full list of changes.

Stay up to date:
Like us on the FB
Subscribe to our Blog
Subscribe to our Youtube channel
Follow us on Twitter
Join our mailing list
Follow our twitch.tv livestream - we sometimes code live on twitch
Community Announcements - John
Happy New Year!

We are releasing a hot fix today for our Christmas update.

This update is on a Steam branch, meaning it will not automatically download. You must manually switch to that branch to see this new version.
- Right click on Prison Architect in your games list
- Click 'Properties'
- Click 'Betas'
- Select 'beta' from the list. (Restart steam if it doesn't show up)
- The update will then download.

FIXES:

Guards whose needs are not being met were beating up the prisoners. This can still happen, but it should happen much more rarely now.

Extras | Map Settings dialog will now allow Staff Needs to be enabled if you already have enabled everything else.

Stay up to date:
Like us on the FB
Subscribe to our Blog
Subscribe to our Youtube channel
Follow us on Twitter
Join our mailing list
Follow our twitch.tv livestream - we sometimes code live on twitch
Rock, Paper, Shotgun - contact@rockpapershotgun.com (Brendan Caldwell)

The top-down shanking simulator Prison Architect [official site] has received an update that introduces needs for the prison’s staff, including the desire to go for a whizz, eat food in the canteen and the need to feel safe while working. The game was supposed to be fully cooked, or at least that’s what developers Introversion said in August with their 2.0 “final” update, saying that it wouldn’t be getting any more features. But they’ve gone back on their word, the dogs>, saying that this feature has been “something that has been niggling away in the back of our minds”. … [visit site to read more]

PC Gamer

In August, Prison Architect launched its 45th update—version 2.0, the final instalment of the jail simulator's impressive list of feature-filled incremental amendments spanning Early Access into full release. With it, Introversion gave players access to the game's dev tools and cheat mode and announced plans to focus its attention on its next project. 

That's been the case, so says producer Mark Morris and designer Chris Delay in the latest developer-led trailer below, however Prison Architect has also now received its 11th post-launch update.   

"This frosty December, we give you guard needs," explains the video below's description. "No longer can you treat your hard working prison officers as robot gaolers. They're going to need their own toilet and canteen and your staff room is about to get a whole lot busier."

Morris notes above that until now, Prison Architect has focussed on its prisoners and not its guards for good reason—that narrowing the scope of the latter's credentials allowed the game to be more fluid in its earlier stages. 

"You need your guards to do what you tell them to do otherwise it will look like it's just broken," says Delay. "If you say build me a building here, make a holding cell or a toilet block or something and your guards just don't do it, an early player is just going to go 'this game's rubbish'."

Morris adds: "Those are valid concerns and that's probably why we shied away from it for all this time. We thought from a gameplay standpoint it'll be better if your staff are more like automatons and the prisoners were where all the magic was. But I think the game is mature enough now and established enough, and there are enough systems in game to telegraph to the player what the hell is going on that we can get away with it."

A whole host of considerations are now tied to staff wellbeing including toilet breaks, meal times, health and safety concerns, recreation allowance, comfort in the workplace, and rest to but some of the new criteria. Full details can be found on the game's Steam page, alongside details for installing the Update 11.   

Prison Architect is out now and costs £19.99/$29.99 on the Humble Store.

Some online stores give us a small cut if you buy something through one of our links. Read our affiliate policy for more info.

Dec 20, 2016
Community Announcements - sPray
Prison Architect Update 11 has been released! Merry Christmas everyone.

This update is on a steam branch, meaning it will not automatically download. You must manually switch to that branch to see this new version.
- Right click on Prison Architect in your games list
- Click 'Properties'
- Click 'Betas'
- Select 'beta' from the list. (Restart steam if it doesn't show up)
- The update will then download.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mAmjOQJ0LTw

Staff Needs
Your security staff now have needs, in much the same way as prisoners. This is optional, and can be enabled when creating a new prison, or enabled from Extras -> Map Settings.

You must take care of your staff needs, or else your staff will begin to perform their duties badly.

The staff members affected in this update are:

Guards
Armed Guards
Dog Handlers
Snipers
These staff will have a semi random mixture of the following needs. Each need is similar to its prisoner counterpart, but also slightly different:

BLADDER
BOWELS
Staff will only make use of toilets in staff designated zones or staff rooms
FOOD
Staff will eat in the Staff Room if you add a Serving Table. Or you can designate a canteen as "Staff Only" and they will eat there instead. Staff meals are more expensive than prisoner meals and are automatically delivered.
SAFETY
Staff hate to feel they are in danger. You can help with this need by equipping your staff with Tazers, body armour etc, as well as ensuring strength in numbers.
RECREATION
Staff get bored too. They can now make use of any entertainment so long as it exists within a staff room. Eg Pool tables, radios, TVs, etc.
COMFORT
Put some sofas in the staff room for this.
ENVIRONMENT
Same as prisoners, this is entirely based on the cleanliness of the surroundings.
REST
This replaces the "tiredness" mechanic. Be sure to give your staff enough down time.
If staff are happy, this contributes in a positive way towards the temperature of your prison. Likewise if they are unhappy, this will make the prison "hotter" and lead to more trouble later.

If you do not take care of your staff they will become "pissed off", and begin to perform their jobs badly:

Sauntering around slowly when doing jobs
Less effective at searching for contraband
Less likely to actively look for trouble, more likely to turn a blind eye
Unwilling to put themselves in danger eg confronting gang members
In extreme cases, staff will take bribes in order to look the other way when searching for contraband

Staff break times
You can now specify how much break time to grant your staff. Go to Reports -> Policy.
You can choose how long each break is, and how many breaks per day are taken.
Staff on break will immediately begin attending to their needs. Nb. Staff will always finish their current job before starting their break.

Other changes
Arcade Cabinets have had their sound turned down
Larger clone size with Tools and Cheats enabled.
Main menu: 'Terms and Conditions' moved to Options menu.
Main menu: Added 'Other Introversion Games' link.
Tooltip added to Analytics in Options menu.

BUG Fixes
Fixed: Dog Handlers would be completely paralised if injured, and there was no Medical Ward
Crash when loading with mods which define a custom room.
Family Rooms no longer erroneously display the cell quality too high warning.


Stay up to date:
Like us on the FB
Subscribe to our Blog
Subscribe to our Youtube channel
Follow us on Twitter
Join our mailing list
Follow our twitch.tv livestream - we sometimes code live on twitch
Rock, Paper, Shotgun - contact@rockpapershotgun.com (Adam Smith)

An entirely objective ranking of the 50 best PC strategy games ever made, now brought up to date with the riches of the last two years. From intricate wargames to soothing peacegames, the broad expanse of the genre contains something for everyone, and we’ve gathered the best of the best. The vast majority are available to buy digitally, a few are free to download and play forever. They’re all brilliant.

… [visit site to read more]

PC Gamer

Any week where I get to write twice about Devil Daggers by Wednesday is a good week. On Monday, the lightning-paced 90 s-style arena shooter where you fire glowing magic knives at waves of hell-bound monsters added a nifty top-down replay mode via its version 3 update. Now, it s part of the latest Humble Bundle which is live from right now until October 4.

Alongside roguelike dungeon crawler Runestone Keeper, and the wonderful RollerCoaster Tycoon 2: Triple Thrill Pack, Devil Daggers features in the pay-what-want tier of the Humble Jumbo Bundle 7.

The familiar Humble setup applies in that paying above the average price which is a clean $5 (about 3.85), at the time of writing also nets you tinyBuild s retro boxer Punch Club, Stronghold Crusader 2 (which is currently 29.99/$49.99 on Steam), and Introversion s lovely prison-builder Prison Architect the latter of which recently launched its final update, granting players access to the game s dev tools and cheats.

Should you wish to get your hands on all of that and an Early Access key for survival em up Miscreated, it ll set you back $9.99 (approximately 7.69). As always, payments are split between developers, organisers and charity at your discretion. There's some goodies for free-to-play card game Duelyst up for grabs too.

The Humble Jumbo Bundle 7 runs from now until October 4.

Rock, Paper, Shotgun - contact@rockpapershotgun.com (Alice O'Connor)

In case you’ve not picked up on all the hints: Devil Daggers [official site] is my favourite new game of 2016, and I’d say the best-looking game in yonks too. Devil Daggers is Geometry Wars thrown against a satanic altar in a darkened room made of Quake [see me -metaphors ed.]>. I do recognise a leaderboard-climbing first-person shooter in skull-filled satanarena is a hard sell for some so here, look, it’s in the latest pay-what-you-want Humble Bundle along with Prison Architect and more games. Maybe that makes it cheap enough for you to give it a try?

… [visit site to read more]

Rock, Paper, Shotgun - contact@rockpapershotgun.com (Alec Meer)

Cos this stuff comes up in comments most every time I run one of these: these charts depict the top ten best-selling games on Steam as accumulated over the week leading up to Sunday just gone. They are not what are the top ten best-selling games at this moment in time, as seen on the front-page of Steam and which are invariably a little different. They come from this here Valve RSS feed. If there is any massaging of figures or weighing of e.g. revenue earned vs copies sold then I do not know of it, but neither can I say for certain that there is not. This is, however, pretty much all that Steam ever lets slip about what’s going on, though you can look to the guesstimates on Steam Spy if you want to try and drill down further into actual figures.

So: Steam’s ten biggest games last week. Well, nine and a half. Deus Ex has been dethroned already.

… [visit site to read more]

...

Search news
Archive
2017
Mar   Feb   Jan  
Archives By Year
2017   2016   2015   2014   2013  
2012   2011   2010   2009   2008  
2007   2006   2005   2004   2003  
2002