PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to PC Gamer weekly round-up">Guild Wars 2 Guardian



The big news this week was a surplus of information on Crysis 3 - but it's stealth action FPS Dishonored that creeped in and impressed us with its old-school open-ended sensibilities. Elsewhere, our hopes for STALKER 2 were finally and tragically squashed, but new tidbits of information just might have slipped out about Half-Life 2: Episode 3.



We also took a closer look at Sniper Elite: V2, Guild Wars 2, Microsoft Flight, and TERA. Read on for a full list of this week's biggest stories.





Gabe Newell maybe talked a bit about Half-Life 2: Episode 3, perhaps, by talking about Ricochet 2 instead.

Duncan Geere reviewed 1000 Amps.

Evan took a look at Crysis 3, and interviewed Crytek's senior creative director.

Tom Francis took Crytek to task over the Crysis series' unpopular extraterrestrials.

Henry Winchester previewed Sniper Elite V2, while Tyler took his best shot at the demo.

Steve Hogarty reviewed Microsoft Flight.

Josh played the first few levels with Guild Wars 2's Asura race, and Chris and Graham talked their way through 20 minutes of World vs. World PvP. You can also join our community in the beta weekend.

Josh went to war in TERA.

Chris got a good look at Dishonored, and interviewed designers Harvey Smith (Deus Ex) and Raf Colantonio (Dark Messiah).

STALKER 2's cancellation was finally confirmed, but hope is on the horizon.



 

If you had to talk about Half-Life 2: Episode 3 without actually talking about Half-Life 2: Episode 3, how would you talk about it? The most tortured analogy doesn't win a prize.
Apr 23, 2012
PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to 1000 Amps review">1000 Amps review



If you’re a member of the camp of gamers who believe that the answers to puzzles should never be signposted, and that modern games are way too easy, then you’re going to like 1000 Amps.



You play as a cute lil’ icon called Plug (no relation to the Bash Street Kid) who is attempting to repair a set of electrical stations called the Amp- Tree-System. In each room, you can light up a number of squares by touching them, and when you’ve lit them all, that part of the system is repaired. As you light these squares, you’re given more power – enabling you to jump and teleport. Most of the puzzles rely on using that gradual increase in power to enable you to access more and more lightsquares in each room.







The art style is minimalist. So minimalist, in fact, that you can’t see any of the room you’re in until you touch the squares in question. As such, exploration becomes an exercise in feeling around in the dark, unsure if you’re about to plunge down a hole into another room entirely, losing all your progress in the current room. That’s around the point when 1000 Amps starts getting a little frustrating.



It continues to frustrate when you come up against seeminglyimpossible rooms that have conveyor belts that cart you around against your will, rogue baddies who switch off lights that you’ve switched on, and jumping puzzles that demand pixel-perfect precision.



It’s a defiantly retro path to take, and one that isn’t going to please everyone – especially when failure often means trekking back through several past rooms just to have another go. The map gives you some idea of where you’re supposed to be going, but it’s utterly uninteractive and therefore mostly useless.







The worst moments are when you know exactly what you need to do to solve a room, but can’t quite get the timing of the jumps or teleports right, and you find yourself repeating the same move over and over again, hoping that you fluke your way into doing it right. When you do finally manage that, you won’t think “Amazing! I am so talented!” – you’ll think “Thank God that’s over.” Then you realise that you have to start essentially from scratch in the next room.



The core idea of powering up your character progressively is a solid one, and there are moments of real beauty in the stark-but-cute art style, but ultimately 1000 Amps fails by simply not giving the player enough information, forcing a trial-and-error, guesswork-oriented approach to problem solving. That’s fine when a game gives you another go instantly, but that’s often not an option here.



There is an audience who’ll love 1000 Amps, and the £4 price is excellent value for a puzzle game of this length. But if you prefer your games to be a little more friendly and approachable, then you’re going to want to look elsewhere.
Rock, Paper, Shotgun - contact@rockpapershotgun.com (John Walker)

Everyone's going to be Amp this Halloween.

1000 Amps is one of my favourite puzzle games in years. Brilliantly designed, and constantly interesting, I went so far as to do cosplay to convince you to play it. Hopefully you did. I am convinced lone developer behind The Odd Man Out, 22 year old college student Brandon Brizzi, is one to watch. Which is why I caught up with him to ask about the experience of releasing a successful game, the motivation behind his projects, and why he no longer has to make pizzas.>

(more…)

Feb 29, 2012
Rock, Paper, Shotgun - contact@rockpapershotgun.com (John Walker)

You have to believe me that there's more to it than appears.

What can I do to convince you to play 1000 Amps? The unenigmatic screenshots of black and white levels made of dull tiles are not going to do it. That you’ve never heard of it, nor its developer, Brandon Brizzi’s The Odd Man Out, means you’ve no previous attachment or interest. And if I describe it to you, I still fear it won’t convince you. I’ll have to think of >something>.

(more…)

Announcement - Valve
1000 Amps is Now Available on Steam and 10% off until Wednesday February 29th 10AM PST.

Light up the world! As Plug, you are charged with restoring the expansive Amp-Tree-System, and thwarting an enigmatic intruder. Solve puzzles and explore in 1000 Amps!

Product Release - Valve
1000 Amps is Now Available on Steam and 10% off until Wednesday February 29th 10AM PST.

Light up the world! As Plug, you are charged with restoring the expansive Amp-Tree-System, and thwarting an enigmatic intruder. Solve puzzles and explore in 1000 Amps!

...

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