Feb 27, 2013
PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to Dead Space 3 review">PCG251.rev_dead.grab9







Review by Nathan Ditum



On a city street at the start of Dead Space 3, there’s a poster for a film called Tools Of Terror. It features a man in a tuxedo pulling a James Bond pose, but instead of a pistol he’s holding a wrench. He is, it’s fairly obvious, both an action hero and a blue-collar guy, and despite the fact this film is a spoof – or perhaps because of it – he’s also an accurate symbolic representation of Dead Space hero Isaac Clarke as he appears in this latest game.



"Isaac was a high-functioning spanner in a space suit."

Isaac is an engineer. It’s the thing that made him such an unusual protagonist in the original game – he didn’t talk, he fixed things and had weapons that could conceivably have been used to fix things, if they weren’t busy dismembering the reanimated dead. He was a high-functioning spanner in a space suit, but he returned the John McClane of religious hysteria and viral outbreaks in Dead Space 2.



How could the same shit happen to the same guy twice? And how could he suddenly be so good at it?



The question was raised: is Isaac best as the handyman-in-a-tight-spot or as the stomping shooter frontman? Dead Space 3 fixes on the elegant solution of pushing him in both directions at once. Progression is dependent on a series of hardware fix-ups – this shuttle, that tram system, this alien genocide machine.







But at the same time, Isaac fights wave after wave of monsters while saying things like, “I turned my back on the world because I couldn’t face what had to be done,” – and he’s not talking about an oil change or repairing a carburettor.



"Should it be a     lean horror or an explosive shooter? The game opts to be both."

The debate over Isaac-as-engineer versus Isaac-as-action-hero feeds into Dead Space’s genre identity crisis. Should it be a cold, lean horror, or an explosive shooter? The game opts to be both. This is possible because it consists of big, distinct sections: a breathless high-stakes opener (in the James Bond tradition, appropriately enough), a claustrophobic few hours in a debris field of broken ships orbiting a planet, a lengthy action push on the planet’s icy surface, and a climactic section in an ancient city.



The segments feel episodic, as though they were built by different teams and bolted together to create a varied, lengthy whole. The first major stop is a floating scrapheap, with Isaac exploring a series of derelicts looking for a way to reach the planet below. It’s an expanded echo of the original Dead Space – not just repeating the haunted ship routine, but bringing the quiet, tense and considered approach to a frozen flotilla of craft with Isaac shuttling between them.







Dusty airlocks and the grand, muffled spectacle of Isaac drifting through space are the foreground to the game’s hard sci-fi style, and it fruitfully resurrects the old, effective mix of mundane tasks performed amid calamity. The first moment of dread I’ve experienced since crawling through the guts of the Ishimura – “but I don’t want to find out what’s blocking the tram system” – confirms that this is partly the faithful sequel to Dead Space that people who still resent Isaac for learning to talk or daring to display his human face – have been waiting for.



"The game fruitfully resurrects the old, effective mix of mundane tasks performed amid calamity."

A change of pace on the surface of the planet moves Dead Space 3 into more conventional action territory. The snowstorms and wind-battered outposts are a nod to the influence of The Thing on Dead Space, just as surely as the Ishimura paid tribute to the devastation of the Nostromo in Alien, but the combat here introduces elements of cover-based shooting. There are still encounters with skittering necromorphs in corridors and vent-heavy rooms, but there are also more clearings and open spaces, and action set-pieces in the form of cliff-face rappelling (both up and down), boss encounters (tiresome), and an industrial drill that’s transformed into a giant rusty flesh-whisk (loud).



It feels as though Dead Space 3 has settled on volume and value as part of a big-fisted approach to appealing to everybody. The game feels laudably substantial, although sometimes the pacing suffers. The inclusion of any level that requires players to double back through a now-repopulated section justifies a call of shenanigans; Dead Space 3 does it more than once. And while the inclusion of optional side-missions is definitely a good thing, not just for the added content but also the opportunity for resource gathering, they can feel at odds with the urgency of the larger objective at hand. Near the close, I was offered the chance to explore one such cul-de-sac, and declined in order to continue my in-progress race against a religious fanatic to reach a control panel in time to prevent the extinction of mankind.









Fighting religious fanatics is a staple of Dead Space 3. The intriguing Unitologist sect, which worships the monolith-like Markers, emerges from shadow and conspiracy to offer all-out war. The result is combat against humans for the first time, and an extension of the split that runs down the centre of the game.



"Dead Space 3 manages what the hapless Aliens: Colonial Marines could not - abundant monsters that are also individually deadly."

Combat against the necromorphs is refined and dangerous. It manages what the hapless Aliens: Colonial Marines could not: abundant monsters that are also individually deadly, thanks to Isaac’s accumulated skill set which includes the ability to slow enemies in time, to move and fire small objects with telekinesis, and the need to slice enemies limb by limb in order to despatch them most effectively. It’s a layered, satisfying set of systems.



However it’s also one clearly designed for a game pad – even with options to customise controls, the need to have fingers hovering over four triggers at once makes a mouse and keyboard unwieldy. In contrast, battles against the Unitologist army offer little except variety and gunfire in stereo. They don’t subtract from what might be called the purer Dead Space experience, they just bolt a conventional addition to the side.



The nature of combat is largely determined by the weapons at Isaac’s disposal, which in Dead Space 3 come from the bench. The gun crafting is deep and worthwhile, offering a basic choice of weapon type (plasma, laser cutter, military, explosive) before adding variety (modifiers to these types, the ability to combine any two on larger weapon frames) and stat-tweaking and optimisation.







It rewards experimentation and patience, and is paced sensibly enough that the controversial option to buy raw materials through microtransactions never feels imposing – I always had enough to create weapons that felt suitably powerful, and after one run through the game I had the resources to build pretty much anything.



"The effect of co-op is that some sections are a little strung out and lonely in singleplayer."

It’s possible to make the same cutting, tearing, flaming tools that have been the series’ mainstays, but just as effective now are single-shot weapons with high concentrated damage, and forgiving, spray-and-pray automatic rifles. The basis of Dead Space’s combat is a little undermined; de-limbing enemies is a precise, engineer’s way to kill space zombies. It sits uncomfortably with the game’s own rules that, with damage stats boosted, necromorphs can now be killed with a single sniper shot to the chest.



Also impacting on combat is the addition of co-op. Ironically this makes manifest the split in Isaac’s gaming personality – when present, his co-op partner really is a gruff action soldier type, called Carver, the Tyler Durden to Isaac’s jittery narrator. Co-op is drop-in, drop-out, with cutscenes shifting to reflect Carver’s absence during solo play, the only noticeable effect being that some sections are a little strung out and lonely in singleplayer.



Whether it suits a horror game is a moot point: given Dead Space 3’s efforts to provide both scares and thrills, the impact of co-op is negligible. But it does change the combat, in entirely positive ways. Working together is fun: trapping enemies in stasis for your partner, or rescuing them from pinned execution, and planning what complementary set of weapons to use as a pair. As with the others in the series, Dead Space 3 positively encourages post-completion playthroughs on higher difficulties and with tougher restrictions.







In terms of performance, Dead Space 3 ran without a hitch on an i5 processor-equipped rig with 8GB of RAM and an Nvidia Geforce 560 Ti. Before release, Visceral Games spoke about their aim to create a uniform experience across console and PC, which raised legitimate concerns that the PC version would be a horrendous port. It’s not quite that bad; custom render settings are available from the in-game menu to control various effects like bloom, glow, SSAO, depth of field, and it does look prettier than console versions. I played on 1920 x 1080 with no impact on framerate, which was locked at a steady 30fps – something that can be unlocked with some VSync tweaking.



"It delivers an uncompromised, high-quality horror game."

If this ‘uniform’ approach is slightly disappointing, it’s absolutely in keeping with Dead Space 3’s comprehensive, please-all approach. The game tries hard to be all things to all men (ironic, considering it features a religion with the ultimate objective of making all men into one giant thing). It’s accomplished, it looks wonderful, and delivers an uncompromised, high-quality horror game. It’s just that it’s so big that it delivers a less compelling shooter title as well.



This is perhaps the inevitable reality of creating a searing, stylish new IP – that two sequels down the line, the need to maximise appeal has turned everything great about that game into the still-beating heart of a commercial machine augmented with features, an appealing hero, and explosive moments. Dead Space 3 is still good, and it’s still Dead Space. It’s just lots of other things as well.
Kotaku

EA Lays Off Staff, May Have Shut Down Army of Two Developer Visceral MontrealElectronic Arts has laid off a number of development staff in both Los Angeles and Montreal, the publisher confirmed today.



We're hearing from multiple sources that they've shut down Visceral Montreal, the studio behind upcoming shooter Army of Two: The Devil's Cartel, but EA wouldn't confirm or deny that news.



However, in a statement to Kotaku, an EA spokesperson confirmed layoffs:




Today EA internally announced some adjustments to select development teams to align staff and skills against priority growth areas, including new technologies and mobile. Many employees are being retrained for new positions; however a small number will be released. These are great, talented people and we wish them well. EA is growing globally, and we expect our headcount to increase this year.




When asked whether Visceral Montreal would shut down, an EA spokesperson said "Not disclosing impact on individual teams or studios."



EA's Frank Gibeau also addressed the layoffs in a post on the company's website:




EA's leadership on these high-growth platforms allows us to retain and attract the industry's best talent. Thousands of our existing employees have been retrained and redeployed to work on the new platforms and initiatives. But when it is not possible to redeploy a team, we soften the tough decisions with assistance. This week we let some people go in Los Angeles, Montreal as well as in some smaller locations. These are good people and we have offered outplacement services and severance packages to ease their transition to a new job.




Visceral Montreal is the developer behind shooter Army of Two: Devil's Cartel, scheduled for release on March 26 for Xbox 360 and PS3.


Kotaku

Dead Space Monsters Aren't So Scary When They're Sitting On Your Coffee TableTitan Books has got together with Electronic Arts to release an art book that celebrates the work not just of the team behind the recently-released Dead Space 3, but of the entire series.



The Art of Dead Space, a 300-page, hardcover book, has art from the entire franchise. So not just the three main games, but also spin-offs and other projects like Dead Space: Extraction, Dead Space: Ignition, Dead Space: Salvage and Dead Space: Liberation.



A word of caution: some of the images below are from the end of the game, so don't scroll any further if you're concerned about possible spoilers.



One of the artists featured is Patrick O'Keefe, whose Dead Space 3 pieces we showed you last week.



The Art Of Dead Space [Titan Books]





To see the larger pics in all their glory (or, if they're big enough, so you can save them as wallpaper), right-click on them below and select "open in new tab".

Fine Art is a celebration of the work of video game artists, showcasing the best of both their professional and personal portfolios. If you're in the business and have some concept, environment, promotional or character art you'd like to share, drop us a line!



Dead Space Monsters Aren't So Scary When They're Sitting On Your Coffee Table Dead Space Monsters Aren't So Scary When They're Sitting On Your Coffee Table Dead Space Monsters Aren't So Scary When They're Sitting On Your Coffee Table Dead Space Monsters Aren't So Scary When They're Sitting On Your Coffee Table Dead Space Monsters Aren't So Scary When They're Sitting On Your Coffee Table Dead Space Monsters Aren't So Scary When They're Sitting On Your Coffee Table Dead Space Monsters Aren't So Scary When They're Sitting On Your Coffee Table Dead Space Monsters Aren't So Scary When They're Sitting On Your Coffee Table Dead Space Monsters Aren't So Scary When They're Sitting On Your Coffee Table Dead Space Monsters Aren't So Scary When They're Sitting On Your Coffee Table Dead Space Monsters Aren't So Scary When They're Sitting On Your Coffee Table Dead Space Monsters Aren't So Scary When They're Sitting On Your Coffee Table Dead Space Monsters Aren't So Scary When They're Sitting On Your Coffee Table Dead Space Monsters Aren't So Scary When They're Sitting On Your Coffee Table Dead Space Monsters Aren't So Scary When They're Sitting On Your Coffee Table Dead Space Monsters Aren't So Scary When They're Sitting On Your Coffee Table Dead Space Monsters Aren't So Scary When They're Sitting On Your Coffee Table


Kotaku

Dead Space Started Off As Horror, But Now It's So Much MoreI beat Dead Space 1.



I nearly beat Dead Space 2, but I got so frustrated with one section near the end in which I was trapped in a room with regenerating Necromorphs that I shelved it. (This was after the amazing "needle/eye" bit.)



I come from a long history of loving sci fi, in particular, scary, gritty sci fi. Growing up I was more about "Aliens" than "Star Wars." "Event Horizon," as flawed as it was, still inspired a 20-something Cliff to implement similar scare gags in Unreal 1. "Sunshine" included, I love movies in which man explores space with his best intentions and all Hell breaks loose.



I'm quite familiar with the controversy over Dead Space 3 and the issue of horror versus action. Generally speaking, the scarier a game is the less empowered a player feels. Controls are often clunky on purpose, and the pacing is quite different from an action movie. It feels as if developer Visceral consciously gravitated the franchise more towards the "action" elements over the "suspense/horror" ones, and I'm quite okay with that. We look at the target audience for your average console game and it's often a cocky young male who doesn't want to be scared. Unfortunately, he's the guy who wants to get in and "fuck shit up."



Is it possible to blend the two? Yes, I do think it is, and those of you who have read my interviews in which I talk about how you could do that in Resident Evil have seen the thoughts. (Random idea 1: Alternate between two storylines, one is a first responder and the other is a terrified child.) Horror is HARD, and suspense is even HARDER. It requires a true director's hand. A nudge this way and a moment plays as comedic, a nudge too far the other way and it's not scary at all. To compound it all, making a scary moment is kind of like trying to tickle yourself. You think it's scary, but you're never sure until you test it on someone who has NEVER SEEN THE MOMENT.







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(This is why James Wan is evolving into a great filmmaker. Apart from the slightly over the top 3rd act there are scares in his "Insidious" that work amazingly well.)



Regardless, I'm currently burning through the campaign of DS3 with my wife in co-op and it's still quite a bit of fun. The dynamic of using stasis and limb shooting in a co-op environment works surprisingly well. If there are surprises and scares to be had it's often the person who charges ahead LeeRoy Jenkins style who enjoys them. Grabbing a leg and impaling a foe is worth the effort, and it's gratifying.



I'm still having a hard time wrapping my head around the weapon crafting and upgrading system, to be honest. Generating circuits, crafting them, etc… I could have used a bit more hand holding there. (The UI borders on comedic at times when you're starting a game, with ROTATING METAL PANELS OF STUFF FLYING AT YOU EVERYWHERE!)



Overall game pacing is something that's really hard to get right; it's something that a lead campaign designer or overall lead designer are responsible for and that pacing doesn't let down. The game builds to a crescendo of exciting moments (often with ships crashing) and then it takes its time before getting back into combat. The vistas and skyboxes are breathtaking, and the weapons generally feel good. (One of the issues with making sci-fi weaponry is that the guns don't always look like guns. I know the series was going for more of a "mining equipment" vibe but I often have a hard time figuring out which gun is which when they're icons.)



And yes, there's a part when the game briefly feels like Lost Planet, but it's a welcome change of pacing from dark space corridor after dark space corridor. One of my personal quibbles with the game is the lack of memorable locations. There are just so many corridors; there aren't a lot of areas that can be defined as "the room with the N in it."



Oh, and as a side note the parts when you're in space flying around in your suit are suspenseful but somehow peaceful, if that makes any sense.



At the end of the day this franchise feels like it's starting as a solo experience, a solitary and confined horror game, and now it's evolving into much more than that. You can either fight it or embrace it. I choose the latter, as at the end of the day it's FUN. (We're about 50% through…the giant drill bit section was a highlight.)



p.s. In the 60$ disc based market horror doesn't fly—it's the ultimate "Campaign Rental" that's played for 2 days and traded in and I'm sure EA knows this. When we're fully digital we'll see more true horror games coming back. (Look at Amnesia and Slenderman on PC.)





Cliff Bleszinski is a game industry veteran. He blogs on Tumblr and can be found on Twitter at @therealcliffyb.



Republished with permission.


PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to Dead Space writer: Dead Space 3′s action focus is a “necessary evil”">Dead space 3 - uuaaaarrrgh







Antony Johnston, the writer behind the original fright-filled Dead Space, spoke with NowGamer on the more action-heavy tone in the just-released Dead Space 3. Though he prefers fear over firepower, Johnston believes the increased action is "a necessary evil" to ensure growth of the series.



"I’m personally a big fan of old-school survival horror, and that was one of the main reasons I wanted to work on Dead Space," he says. "So the greater emphasis on big action in the sequels means they’re not really for me."



Johnston states that expanding Dead Space 3's fan base through action sequences presents "a very difficult balancing act" for Visceral, and he commends the studio for "an admirable job of maintaining that balance" in the wake of concerns over the diminished fear factor and the inclusion of a co-op mode.



"I know the developers always wanted to go bigger, in terms of scope," Johnston says. "And I’ve mentioned before that the universe we created was huge, with lots of elements, which simply didn’t make it into the first game. So to get that story told, to round out the universe, it was inevitable the settings and environments would open out a bit, become a bit more epic in scale. Otherwise, you’d just have the same game on a different ship each time, and that’s pretty dull."



Read the full article at NowGamer, and let us know: does Dead Space 3's action mesh well with its more terrifying moments?
Kotaku

One Thing Dead Space 3 Gets So, So RightWhen it comes right down to it, Dead Space 3 is a game about standing in a corner and blasting aliens into bloody bits. I've been playing through the opening hours of the game, and despite recognizing the various problems mentioned in some reviews (including Tina's less-than-glowing review), I have to say that after six or so hours, I'm enjoying myself quite a bit.



Leaving aside the game's overarching successes and failings, I want to take a moment to go in-depth with the thing Dead Space does nigh-on peerlessly: this game knows how to stomp.



The thrill of stomping an alien into the floor is the primary reason I like Dead Space games. It has yet to get old. (I gather that given Dead Space 3's length, it might? But it hasn't yet.) Despite developer Visceral's insistence on adding detailed backstorthy, character-motivation and lore, only one Dead Space "story" captures my imagination, and it's this one: I'm backing up slowly, blasting away at horrifying creatures, hoping to violently dismantle them all before they get their massive, spiny hooks into me. That's it. That's literally the entire game, as far as I'm concerned. Everything else is just window-dressing.



I looked over my 2011 review of Dead Space 2 and found myself saying more or less the same thing:




Visceral has created a world in which things have real heft to them—metal body-suits contract and lock into place with satisfying clicks and pops, alien limbs are severed with disgustingly satisfying cracks, and mucus, blood and viscera splat and explode with palpable physicality. When Isaac stomps monsters beneath his feet, he begins to scream from behind his helmet, a panicked, desperate cry that's all but drowned out by the pounding of metal boots into flesh. Visceral Games, indeed.




The stomping in Dead Space 3 is just as good as in its predecessor. Sure, Isaac's motivation is murky, and he's a lump of a main character. Sure, the sidequests already feel kind of repetitive just a few hours in, and the jump-scares and large-scale encounters are entirely predictable. But sometimes I have to ask: when it feels this good to smash monsters to smithereens, who cares?



Watch this:










That combo move, which I have creatively named the "Kneecap-Then-Stomp," is my go-to tool for enemy destruction in the early goings. (I understand that I'll eventually be able to make weapons that far outstrip my current assault rifle/shotgun combo, but hey, so far this seems to work.) First, you shoot the enemy in the leg so that it falls onto the ground. Then, approach and stomp. Rinse and repeat until everything is dead.



Here, check out this extended cut of an encounter I survived during the game's second optional side mission:










I'm playing on normal difficulty, so it's easier for me to blast off limbs and close in for the stomp. Watch the way Isaac is animated, bringing his gun-arm up and throwing his leg down. It mirrors the urgency with which I'm mashing the shoulder-button, willing him to just crush this fucking thing so that I can whip my head up and deal with whatever fresh hell is likely onrushing.



In those moments, I feel vitally connected to the game and to Isaac, and I get a sense of just how disorienting it would be to begin frantically stomping while wearing a heavy suit of space-armor. Notice how the camera shakes when Isaac brings his boot down. Between the strobe-lights, the writhing monsters and the camera-jitters, it's all so desperate and chaotic and violent. And perhaps most impressive, it's seamless. The idea with these kinds of big games is that the craft will blend into the background and the player won't notice just how many people it took to make each part of a game work properly. And so it is with Isaac's stomp. But when I pause to think about how many different things had to work in harmony to make the stomp as awesome as it is, it's hard not to be impressed.



Clearly the folks who made Dead Space are aware of how much fun it is to stomp things. See that glowing case over there? Want to know what's inside? Better STOMP IT INTO DUST. The game also makes you stomp on dead monster-bodies to get more power-ups, which is at once an absurd concession to video-game logic (what, did the necromorph eat that extra ammo?) and an endearingly goofy concession to how much we like to stomp.



And okay, the sound. Audio director Nick Laviers and his team are killers. Every time I'll roll my eyes at another hackneyed plot development or grumble at a bit of backtracking, I'll survive an encounter and laugh to myself about how excellent it all sounded. (For more on the game's sound design, check out this cool video from Kill Screen and The Creator's Project.)



Check out the audio on Isaac's stomp:





YES. The boot just smashes into the ground, hitting just the right blend of the carom of the boot and the squish of necromorph-guts. (The scream at the end is another alien, by the way, not Isaac. He never gets that freaked out.)



I've been trying to figure out just what it is that makes me drawn to Dead Space games, sometimes despite myself, and the stomp best encapsulates it. I like how these games feel. The jury's out for me on Dead Space 3 as a whole—I haven't even landed on this ice planet that people seem to have such mixed feelings about, and I haven't sampled the co-op.



Last night on Twitter, I was talking about the game and Polygon's Arthur Gies asked me, with his tongue somewhat in his cheek, yeah, but how does the game make me feel? This was the best I could come up with on short notice:




That pretty much sums it up. The grapes are screaming, and I'm screaming, and as long as I keep stomping, it's a lot of fun. Stomp, stomp.


Kotaku

Dead Space 1 Writer Says Dead Space 3's Action Focus Was A 'Necessary Evil' Some would contest whether or not Dead Space was ever a scary franchise, but most will agree that Dead Space 3 focuses more on being an action title. In a recent NowGamer interview, Dead Space 1 writer Antony Johnston explained why he thinks the added action emphasis occurred.



While admitting that the newer Dead Space games weren't really for him thanks to the action focus, he said that the emphasis was "a necessary evil in order to broaden the fan base."



"I know the developers always wanted to go bigger, in terms of scope. And I've mentioned before that the universe we created was huge, with lots of elements, which simply didn't make it into the first game.



"So to get that story told, to round out the universe, it was inevitable the settings and environments would open out a bit, become a bit more epic in scale."



Without the more epic scale Johnston claims that Dead Space would likely become "pretty dull."



What do you think, does Johnston have a point? It seems to me that regardless of what Dead Space "really is" (or was), there is a group of people that wish Dead Space 3 was more of a horror game. People who are upset to be cast aside for the sake of a wider audience, even.



Dead Space 3's Action Focus A 'Necessary Evil' - Dead Space 1 Writer [NowGamer]


Kotaku





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…Literally!



This video from Prima Games shows how to get the "Devil Horns" weapon, which… well, it's actually just a foam finger. Like, from sporting events? Yeah. They say it's the most powerful weapon in the game. Makes sense.



To get it, you'll have to beat the game in classic mode. This is not the first time the Dead Space series has given us the finger. Nor, let's hope, will it be the last.


Kotaku





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Via GameFront, here's how to take advantage of an exploit to farm unlimited resources in horror-survival game Dead Space 3, which came out yesterday for Xbox 360 and PS3.



This, of course, means you won't have to pay for microtransactions in the new EA-published game, which allows you to pay real money in exchange for resource packs. If you have the patience to farm forever, you can get the best weapons without shelling out any extra cash.



Which I suppose raises the question: is it unethical to take advantage of a glitch in order to avoid paying for downloadable content? I guess that's up to you.



Dead Space 3 Unlimited Resource Farming Glitch [YouTube]


Kotaku

The Cold, Not-So-Lonely Art Of Dead Space 3The game itself may be dividing critics, but I'd hope there's one thing we can all agree on, and that's the fact that before the game's frozen wastelands could be played, they first had to be drawn by some very talented people.



We've featured Patrick's work here before, but now that Dead Space 3 is available at retail, he's been cleared to release and share with us a whole ton of artwork, most of which is presented here at wallpaper scale.



You can see more of Patrick's stuff at his personal site.





To see the larger pics in all their glory (or, if they're big enough, so you can save them as wallpaper), right-click on them below and select "open in new tab".

Fine Art is a celebration of the work of video game artists, showcasing the best of both their professional and personal portfolios. If you're in the business and have some concept, environment, promotional or character art you'd like to share, drop us a line!



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