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PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to Crysis 3 multiplayer DLC The Lost Island now out, here’s the launch trailer">Crysis 3





The first multiplayer DLC for Crysis 3 dropped on Tuesday, bringing with it a host of new tropical content including four new maps, two weapons and two new multiplayer modes: Frenzy and Possession. Crysis 3: The Lost Island now has a launch trailer to celebrate the first weekend of jungle-bound mayhem with lots of smash cuts, sunsets and nanosuited parkour.





One of the great things about Crysis 3’s multiplayer is the incredible sense of speed that comes from vaulting up over walls at a dead sprint. That feeling of momentum is only compounded when you’re whipping past trees and fat-leaved ferns in a thick island forest.



The two new game modes will be interesting to play in this new setting. Frenzy features a cycling weapons loadout with limited respawn windows, while Possession invites players to scrap over a single flag and hold on for as long as they can. Both of these modes will thrive in the chaotic wooded environments of the Lost Island.



Stepping away from the skyscrapers of the urban jungle results in a lot of interesting juxtaposition, like high-powered nanosuits blasting at each other from atop corrugated iron shacks or a squad of technological super soldiers advancing along a rickety rope bridge. It all looks fantastic, of course.



I’m about to load up the new multiplayer maps, and the first thing I’m going to do is step into thick vegetation, engage my stealth power and start making predator noises into my headset. Because it’s the weekend, that’s why.



The Lost Island is out now for PC.



 
PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to Is Crysis 3 getting some tropical island DLC?">Crysis 3 DLC?







Visions of paradise have tantalized us as summer nears; the Sims 3's next expansion looms on the horizon, a mirage of houseboats and comical krakens and coconut-shell bikini tops. But what if you're looking for something a little grittier? Well, signs are pointing to a possible Crysis 3 DLC—perhaps an island vacation with bullets whizzing past swaying palms.



MP1st has been keeping an eye on Crysis 3's social media streams, and its findings have been curious. Crytek has been publishing images from past renditions of Crysis—namely, the tropical scenery of Crysis 1. For instance, there's this postcard-pretty view of a greenery-swathed waterfall—with what looks like a new weapon in the bottom-right corner.



And then there's the recently outed list of upcoming Xbox 360 achievements, including such wittily named feats as "Totally Oarsome" and "Wish You Were Here." I'm envisioning smacking some canoeing tourists' faces into a crystal-blue ocean with one of their own oars.



So is Crysis getting back to its roots, eschewing the gloom of a future New York for a jolly jaunt in the jungle? It's pure speculation for now, but we'll be sure to let you know as soon as we hear anything.
Kotaku

Video Games Have Become Obsessed With Bows And Arrows. But Which Game's Bow Is Best?If you've been playing big-budget action video games over the last couple of years, you've probably noticed a few trends. The graphics have gotten better. The animations have become more lifelike. The explosions have gotten more explosive.



And more recently, amid all those improvements, has come a trend that's even more earth-shattering and important: Video games have discovered the bow and arrow.



Call it the "bowification" of video games. Far Cry 3. Crysis 3. Assassin's Creed III. Tomb Raider. In just the past six months, we've had four high profile games include a bow and arrow as a primary weapon. In an impressive bit of reverse evolution, it seems video games have finally discovered the bow and arrow, decades after they discovered the assault rifle.



All this goes along with pop culture's more general bow-obsession, with Katniss Everdeen using her archery chops to survive The Hunger Games and Brave's Merida besting each of her suitors in an archery contest, Robin Hood-style. Way to be current, video games!



A few notes: First of all, cossbows don't count. Sorry, Dishonored! I'm going to focus on four games that are pretty recent, as they represent the current height of video game bow-and-arrow design. So, I've left off games like Turok, Wii Sports Resort, and any of the Zelda games. I've also left off a few games where the bows don't really have a mechanical component to them—my bow and arrow in Guild Wars 2 operates pretty much like a gun; same thing with Diablo III or Torchlight II. I am including Skyrim, because that game is interesting and its iteration on the Elder Scrolls' bow and arrow design is cool. If there are other video game bows you think are worthy of recognition, I hope you'll mention them in the comments.



Here we go, ranked from last to first:








#5: Assassin's Creed III







Video Games Have Become Obsessed With Bows And Arrows. But Which Game's Bow Is Best?



How it works: Aim and fire with the Y/Triangle button.



How you cancel a shot: Press B/O.



How you aim: You select a target using the aiming feature, then Connor does the rest for you.



One hit? One kill with most humans, but not with animals.



Better than a gun? No, not in this case. The Assassin's Creed III bow is silent, which is good for taking out guards quietly, but in general it's inferior to the game's pistols, particularly the moment you've been spotted. Aiming and firing simply takes too long to be effective.



Upgrades: None to speak of.



Fakest thing you can do: The more I think about it, the more I think that Assassin's Creed III's bow might be the most realistic of all the video game bows on this list. Which unfortunately seems to have contributed to it being in last place.



Greatest moment: There's something to be said for hunting from the treetops in Assassin's Creed III, and the bow always felt at home in the woods.



John Rambo says: "Your worst nightmare."



Overall Opinion: The bow in Assassin's Creed III just doesn't feel very good to fire. The auto-aiming is strange and doesn't allow you to track a moving target, and as I've noted before, pressing "Y" (or triangle) to aim a weapon feels a bit like standing on your tiptoes to reach something in a high cupboard. There's a lack of satisfying impact, as well.








#4: Crysis 3







Video Games Have Become Obsessed With Bows And Arrows. But Which Game's Bow Is Best?



How it works: Zoom with the left trigger, pull the string back with the right. Release to fire.



How you cancel a shot: Click the right thumbstick.



How you aim: You don't actually aim along the arrow, but rather using crosshairs on your HUD combined with a green line indicating the arrow's trajectory.



One hit? One kill, provided you've got your draw-strength up for the bigger baddies.



Better than a gun? Without question. It's so much better than a gun, in fact, that it makes the guns totally pointless and throws off the balance of the game.



Upgrades: Your bow comes outfitted with all manner of special arrows, so they don't really qualify as "upgrades." But Prophet's bow can fire regular arrows, explosive arrows, thermite-tipped arrows that explode on a delay, and arrows that deliver a deadly electric shock.



Greatest moment: The sound design on the Crysis 3 bow makes up for its odd feel—the tension of the arrow combined with the thunk of impact makes it clear that this thing is really a deadly future-weapon in the guise of a bow and arrow.



Fakest thing you can do: At first I was going to say that having your arrows designed so that they'd show up on your heads-up display for gathering was unrealistic, but actually, that's exactly the sort of thing that some military weapons-designer would probably do.



John Rambo Says: "I could have killed 'em all, I could've killed you. In town you're the law, out here it's me. "



Overall Opinion: Prophet's bow in Crysis 3 is sort of a "bow in name only." Sure, it looks like a tricked-out compound bow. Yes, it fires arrows. But it's so powerful and futuristic that it's almost entirely removed from the more primal appeal of the weapon itself. Furthermore, because the bow can be fired while cloaked, it throws off the precarious balance struck by the first two Crysis games and makes Prophet overpowered.








#3: Skyrim














How it works: Aim with the right trigger, release to fire. Hit the left trigger to toggle slow-mo, if you have the ability. As a demonstration, check out this TOTALLY SICK VIDEO I just shot today. I was going to grab a screenshot to show how the bow works, but I happened to fire this arrow and... yesssss.



My first thought was "I can't believe no one saw that." Then I checked the corner and saw that I'd accidentally hit the record button and captured the whole thing using Fraps. Victory! So, I thought I'd share it here. (And okay, maybe it's not actually that hard to do—it does kind of look like the bird relocated so that my arrow would hit it. But I felt pretty proud, so. Anyway.)



How you cancel a shot: Press X, a welcome addition to the Elder Scrolls series, as in the past you'd have to fire into the ground and then pick up your arrow.



How you aim: Right along the arrow, with a zoom-in if you've purchased the required perk.



One hit? Rarely one kill, unless you're up against a weak enemy or you're firing from stealth.



Better than a gun? There are no guns in Skyrim, though video game marketers seem fond of suggesting that there are several other games that satisfy that particular fan desire…



Upgrades: The most important upgrade is the ability to slow down time while aiming, which is a boon for those who play this game with a controller, in particular. However, thanks to the game's crafting system, you can upgrade your bow in all manner of other deadly ways. My Daedric bow shoots lightning arrows, for example.



Greatest moment: Picking off an entire roomful of bandits without alerting a single one. The "bang!" sound of a successful sneak attack is never less that satisfying, and it's only heightened by the goofy way the ragdoll physics can take over once they go flying. It's also fun to peg a dragon in midair with an arrow, partly because it's such a difficult trick to pull off. Unless you're me, as evidenced by that amazing video I've already talked about too much.



Fakest thing you can do: You can upgrade your bow so that it fires lightning and traps souls! God, how unrealistic.



John Rambo says: "It's in the blood! It's natural! Peace? That's an accident!"



Overall Opinion: While Skyrim's combat is generally not on par with the other games on this list, I actually like the bow and arrow a lot. It never quite has the stopping power I'd like it to when I've got a troll charging at me head-on, but when sneaking, there are few weapons in the Skyrim universe as deadly and satisfying.








#2: Far Cry 3







Video Games Have Become Obsessed With Bows And Arrows. But Which Game's Bow Is Best?



How it works: You aim with the left trigger and pull the string back with the right trigger.



How you cancel a shot: There isn't a consistent way, unfortunately. You can switch arrow-types if you've got an additional arrow assigned to the D-pad, but that's an unsteady workaround at best. I have memories of being able to inconsistently cancel pulled arrows, but haven't been able to recreate that in my game. If there's a way, I'm not sure what it is. Meaning that I wind up shooting my arrows into the ground and grabbing them. You got so much right, Far Cry 3!



Update: Since enough of you guys pointed out that in theory it's totally easy to cancel a shot, I thought I'd give it an even more thorough test. Looks like this issue is only on PC, or even just my PC, and it's inconsistent. I'm able to get "R" on the keyboard to cancel the shot every time, but "X" on the controller is inconsistent at best. Often it won't work at all. So, good on you for the most part, Far Cry 3—the issue isn't with your design but appears to be with your PC controller setup. Your bow is still pretty cool, though.



How you aim: You can get either a red-dot sight or a more advanced hunter's sight, which accounts for drop-off. I never quite mastered the way aiming works, but I did always use the hunter's sight, even though it was more difficult to see what was going on.



One hit? One kill.



Better than a gun? Not really. The bow is arguably better for silent takedowns, but it's hard to top a powerful silenced assault rifle or sniper rifle, particularly if you've unlocked the later weapons in the game. That said, it's certainly cooler than a gun, and holds its own.



Upgrades: You could eventually either make fire-arrows or explosive arrows. The explosive arrows were oddly underpowered, and often it took more than one to blow up a vehicle or kill a guy.



Greatest moment: Hunting actual animals, actually. Some of the most enjoyable side-missions in Far Cry 3 were the advanced bow hunts, where you'd be tasked with taking down a deadly jungle beast using only the bow and regular arrows. Usually it involved finding a good vantage point and hitting shots from far enough away that the tiger/leopard in question wouldn't be able to find you. But these sequences effectively captured the thrill of creeping through the underbrush, bow in hand.



Fakest thing you can do: Make an explosive-tipped arrow out of a hand grenade while under duress in the wild. Look, I get that Jason Brody has become something of a badass while on this adventure, but.



John Rambo says: "You know what you are... what you're made of. War is in your blood. Don't fight it. You didn't kill for your country. You killed for yourself."



Overall opinion: The bow in Far Cry 3 is a cool, empowering weapon, and easily the game's defining mode of dealing destruction. While silenced sniper rifles can generally get the same job done from a longer range, the bow itself was my weapon of choice for the majority of the game, particularly when hunting.








#1: Tomb Raider







Video Games Have Become Obsessed With Bows And Arrows. But Which Game's Bow Is Best?



How it works: Aim with the left trigger, pull back the string with the right trigger.



How you cancel a shot: Let go of the left trigger. Okay, hold on. This is the only game on this list to adopt this method of canceling a shot, and it deserves mention, because it's great. Initially, I was uncomfortable canceling shots this way, but only because it felt so unfamiliar. As it turns out, this is a very natural, subtly brilliant way of doing things. It's a much more accurate amalgamation of what you'd actually do if you decided you didn't want to shoot an arrow. You'd release the string.



How you aim: Down the arrow using a crosshair.



One hit? One kill, as long as you're sneaking or can score a headshot. In combat, it depends.



Better than a gun? Absolutely. The bow is a silent killer, has a ton of non-combat uses, and is wicked powerful and accurate over long distances.



Upgrades: By the end of Tomb Raider, Lara's bow has become something of a swiss army knife. It can fire regular, flaming, and explosive arrows, sure. It can also fire a rope that can manipulate objects in the environment and even attach to cliff-sides and set up ziplines. Coupled with her automated rope-retractor, she can demolish large chunks of wood and access new areas. She also uses her arrows as a makeshift melee weapon, and to skin animals after hunting. After a couple of days on the island, Lara's bow is no longer the sad little wooden thing she pulled off the corpse at the start; it's a wicked-looking high-tech compound bow with a counterweight and nasty arrows.



Greatest moment: There's a sequence near the middle of the game where Lara enters a large wooded area at night. It's full of guards. The first time I played this bit, I was able to creep through the woods, silently picking off guard after guard until none were left standing. It was probably my favorite sequence in the entire game—Lara Croft as deadly predator, dealing death with a bow and arrow.



Fakest thing you can do: While I value the utility, I'm not at all convinced that a bow could fire a rope-arrow into a cliff face firmly enough to let me peg that rope and climb across a chasm.



John Rambo says: "When you're pushed, killing's as easy as breathing."



Overall Opinion: Turns out there's a reason that Lara's bow has been featured so prominently in Tomb Raider's promotional materials—the weapon feels inextricably tied to Lara in the new game, and between the two of them, they can overcome almost any obstacle. The bow has a marvelous feeling of physicality to it, including how Lara can only pull the string back for so long before her aim starts to shake. The decision to give players the ability to hit "up" and flick Lara's lighter, igniting the arrow, was inspired. I found it telling that in the game, I used Lara's bow whenever possible, even when it wasn't the most powerful option, unless I was getting rushed by enemies on either side. Even then, whipping out a machine gun or shotgun just felt wrong somehow.



So, Tomb Raider wins it by a neck. Far Cry 3 put up a good fight, but while that game does have some very fun bow-hunting, the bow itself doesn't match Lara Croft's weapon in all its upgraded glory. My Skyrim bow is all well and good, but falls short in heated combat. Crysis 3's bow is barely a bow at all, really—more of an overpowered killing device—that may be to some players' taste, but it isn't to mine. And Assassin's Creed III's bow, like so many other things about that game, is better in concept than in execution.



Congrats, Lara. Take a bow. You are currently the video game archer to beat. At least until it turns out there's an awesome bow and arrow in BioShock Infinite or The Last of Us. Which, given the industry's current bow-happy state, wouldn't surprise me in the least.


Kotaku

Wii U Can Handle Crysis 3 (And Almost Did), Says Crytek Head Despite what Nintendo would likely call its own best efforts, the Wii U has struggled to attract third-party game makers. Some developers might tell you that's because the Wii U is underpowered, but Crytek CEO Cevat Yerli told a different story to VentureBeat this week.



When asked about the Nintendo console, Yerli offered up the following:




We did have Crysis 3 running on the Wii U. We were very close to launching it. But there was a lack of business support between Nintendo and EA on that. Since we as a company couldn't launch on the Wii U ourselves—we don't have a publishing license—Crysis 3 on Wii U had to die.




It's a shame when games fall victim to the politics of business, which sounds like what happened. But if the Wii U can indeed run the technically impressive Crysis 3, who knows what else is possible on Nintendo's latest system?



The full interview goes into the nitty-gritty of Crytek's upcoming free-to-play shooter Warface, and it's certainly worth a look for those interested in the German studio's wildly varying business models.



Crytek chief puts on his Warface and says why Crysis 3 for Wii U ‘had to die' (interview) [VentureBeat via Game Informer]


Kotaku





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allowfullscreen="true">

Whoo boy, those Crysis 3 graphics. I knew they were good, but I had no idea you could get so enthusiastic about it. I guess I underestimated the passion of bros.



Now excuse me—I'm feeling the urge to make some modifications to my PC.



Bro Team: Crysis 3 [Machinima]


Kotaku

Crytek Head: So Far, Crysis 3 Is Our MasterpieceCrytek head Cevat Yerli has come out in defense of his studio's latest game, Crysis 3. In an interview with Gamasutra, Yerli says that the game is "so far, our masterpiece," and that he feels it's better than both Crysis 2 and the original Crysis in all aspects.



He blames the game's tepid reception on the fact that gamers have fatigue with this console generation and with sequels, and says that because the first Crysis was such a different sort of game for its time, it had a bigger impact, which has caused gamers to remember it more fondly than it deserves.



While I agree that history has warped our view of the first Crysis a bit—it's a fun but uneven game with some glaring flaws—for the most part I just don't agree with Yerli's assessment. I found Crysis 3 to be mediocre in almost every way, a short, unfocused, un-engaging game that fell short of both of its predecessors. Crysis 2 was a well-constructed quasi-linear shooter that made up for its personality deficit with enjoyable, balanced combat and polished production. Crysis 1, while uneven, at its best was yards beyond either Crysis 2 or 3. Though I do agree that the first Crysis had a lot of problems that are easy to ignore in favor of focusing on those great opening chapters.



Yerli goes on to say that while Crysis 3 had triple the budget of its predecessors, the only way it could secure that budget was by going multi-platform. But developing for the Xbox 360 and PS3 along with PC held them back.




"The consoles are eight year old devices. Of course, in one way or another, they will limit you. It's impossible not to be limited by a limited console. By definition it's the case. So if it were PC only, could we have done more things? Certainly, yes. Could we have afforded a budget to make a game like Crysis 3 PC only? No. People have to understand that this is a journey of give and take."




That must be frustrating. Visually, the PC version of Crysis 3 is miles beyond the console versions, but the core of the game—the size of the levels, number of enemies, and basic design and artificial intelligence—remains the same. While a PC-only version of the game may indeed have been cost-prohibitive, it's not hard to imagine what Yerli and his team could have done had they been able to make Crysis 3 for the PS4 and the next Xbox, rather than the current generation of consoles.



As it stands, the game is still technically impressive in a lot of ways, but it'll likely be remembered as an end-of-generation footnote as we make the leap to new, more powerful consoles. Timing is everything, I guess.



Go read the full interview at Gamasutra.


Kotaku

Crysis 3 Performance Test: Graphics Cards And CPUsBuilt with CryEngine2, the original Crysis raised the bar for PC gaming graphics in 2007 with stunningly detailed visuals that crippled even the fastest of rigs. Looking back at our first Crysis performance article, which was based on the game's demo, the fastest GPU available at the time (the GeForce 8800 GTX 768MB) struggled to average 30fps when running at 1920x1200 with high quality settings on DirectX 10.



Given how punishing the first game was, we were excited to explore 2011's CryEngine 3-based Crysis 2, but it was quickly apparent that the second installment wouldn't be a repeat performance. Not to say it didn't look better, but relative to Crytek's first title, the sequel didn't really set any new benchmarks. It was just another computer game that made great use of DX9, though DX11 was eventually patched in.



Fast-forward two years and Crytek has given us another opportunity to hammer some hardware with the arrival of Crysis 3 this month. Like the second title, the third installment has been built with CryEngine 3, though that doesn't mean you should expect lousy PC features, as the engine has been updated with improved dynamic cloth and vegetation, better lighting and shadows, and plenty more.



Crysis 3 Performance Test: Graphics Cards And CPUs



Plus, PC gamers won't have to wait for graphical extras. Crysis 3 launched with high-resolution textures, DX11 support and plenty of customization options that set it apart from the diluted consoles builds. The result looks incredible and we get the feeling this will prove to be the game that folks who are heavily invested in multi-GPU setups have been waiting for. Here's hoping we aren't woefully disappointed.



Testing Methodology


We'll be testing 18 DirectX 11 graphics card configurations from AMD and Nvidia, which is considerably less than the 29 we tested for Far Cry 3 because even with the medium quality preset activated, there are almost no low-end graphics cards that can play Crysis 3, even at 1680x1050.



The latest drivers will be used, and every card will be paired with an Intel Core i7-3960X to remove CPU bottlenecks that could influence high-end GPU scores.



We're using Fraps to measure frame rates during 90 seconds of gameplay footage from Crysis 3's first level, "Post Human." The test starts as soon as Michael "Psycho" Sykes hands you his backup weapon, we then simply follow the party leader until the time runs out.



Crysis 3 Performance Test: Graphics Cards And CPUs



We'll test Crysis 3 at three common desktop display resolutions: 1680x1050, 1920x1200 and 2560x1600, using the DX11 mode. For the very high-quality test, we'll set the "overall quality" in the video quality menu to very high while also setting the SMAA level to 1 (low). The high and medium-quality tests will also be conducted with SMAAx1 enabled.















  • Gigabyte Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition (3072MB)

  • Gigabyte Radeon HD 7970 (3072MB)

  • Gigabyte Radeon HD 7950 Boost (3072MB)

  • Gigabyte Radeon HD 7950 (3072MB)

  • AMD Radeon HD 7870 (2048MB)

  • AMD Radeon HD 7850 (2048MB)

  • HIS Radeon HD 7770 (1024MB)

  • HIS Radeon HD 6970 (2048MB)

  • Gigabyte GeForce GTX 680 (4096MB)

  • Gigabyte GeForce GTX 680 (2048MB)

  • Gigabyte GeForce GTX 670 (2048MB)

  • Gigabyte GeForce GTX 660 Ti (2048MB)

  • Gigabyte GeForce GTX 660 (2048MB)

  • Gigabyte GeForce GTX 650 Ti (2048MB)

  • Gigabyte GeForce GTX 580 (1536MB)

  • Gigabyte GeForce GTX 560 Ti (1024MB)

  • Nvidia GeForce GTX 480 (1536MB)




  • Intel Core i7-3960X Extreme Edition (3.30GHz)

  • x4 4GB G.Skill DDR3-1600 (CAS 8-8-8-20)

  • Gigabyte G1.Assassin2 (Intel X79)

  • OCZ ZX Series 1250w

  • Crucial m4 512GB (SATA 6Gb/s)

  • Microsoft Windows 7 SP1 64-bit

  • Nvidia Forceware 314.07

  • AMD Catalyst 13.2 (Beta 6)









High Quality Performance








Crysis 3 Performance Test: Graphics Cards And CPUs



Ramping up to high quality, the GTX 680 landed square on the 60fps mark when testing at 1680x1050, while the GTX 670 followed with 55fps and the HD 7970 GHz edition was forced into the 4xfps territory with the GTX 660 Ti. It seems like the non-Ti GTX 660 or the HD 7950 are about as low as you'll want to go, as both were near the 40fps mark with the Nvidia card on top by 3fps.



Crysis 3 Performance Test: Graphics Cards And CPUs



At 1920x1200, Crysis 3 kicked the GTX 680 10fps below our ideal and the GTX 670 joined AMD's flagship in the 40fps range—albeit with a 5fps lead. The HD 7970 GHz Edition averaged 41fps, narrowly beating the GTX 660 Ti by a single frame.



Crysis 3 Performance Test: Graphics Cards And CPUs



Crysis 3 is barely playable when running on high at 2560x1600, with the GTX 680 and HD 7970 GHz Edition barely offering 30fps. If you want play with these settings on a single-GPU card, you'll likely need Nvidia's new GTX Titan.









Very High Quality Performance







Crysis 3 Performance Test: Graphics Cards And CPUs



With the high quality preset being so taxing, we wondered if there was any point in testing on a more intensive setting. But we did, and things aren't pretty—or, well, they're too pretty. At 1680x1050, the GTX 680 managed 44fps and stood as the only card to exit the 30fps range, which is populated with the GTX 670, HD 7970, GTX 660 Ti and HD 7950 Boost, though anything below the HD 7970 GHz Edition is pushing it in our opinion.



Crysis 3 Performance Test: Graphics Cards And CPUs



Not much needs to be said here: the GTX 680 is your only hope of achieving playable performance, barring the Titan or a multi-GPU solution.



Crysis 3 Performance Test: Graphics Cards And CPUs



This is the resolution I typically game at with one GTX 680 and, naturally, I like to crank everything up. That's not an option here. We'd be interested in seeing how a pair of GTX Titans in SLI perform.





Continue Reading...





Republished with permission from:

Crysis 3 Performance Test: Graphics Cards And CPUs

Steven Walton is a writer at TechSpot. TechSpot is a computer technology publication serving PC enthusiasts, gamers and IT pros since 1998.
PC Gamer
rel="bookmark"
title="Permanent Link to Crysis 3 gets unofficial OnTheFly utility – tweak graphics in-game with a single button press">Crysis 3







MaLDo, creator of the exceptionally pretty Crysis 2 graphics update and spotter of Crysis 3's ropey optimisation issues, has released a new tool for Crytek's latest PC punisher. OnTheFly lets you easily tweak Crysis 3's CVAR values in-game with a single button press. New shortcuts let you hide the HUD, tweak Depth of Field, and load a selection of custom presets. It should be perfect for keeping your frame rate high while your rig's assaulted by the sheer graphical powerhouse that is the first level's moving ropes.



The utility lets you create your own graphics presets, but MaLDo says the ones he provides are plenty pretty, enabling Global Illumination and high distance view even on low. You can also instantly modify the weapon FOV, which Crysis 3 apparently resets after every respawn.



MaLDo is keen to point out that the modified executable is not a crack, so won't bypass the game's DRM. He does, however, warn that the utility is only meant for singleplayer use, and that taking it into multiplayer may result in a ban.



You can download OnTheFly from here. See the full selection of shortcuts it enables below.



O - Hide HUD (Maybe you want to take some beautiful screenshots)

P - Show HUD (Maybe you want to locate enemies after taking screenshots :P)

I - Modify weapon FOV (Crysis 3 resets weapon FOV after every respawn)

6 - Reload low quality preset

7 - Reload recommended quality preset

8 - Reload ultra quality preset

9 - Activate normal Depth of field

0 - Activate ultra Depth of field

T - Activate slowmotion

Z - Deactivate slowmotion.
Shacknews - Steve Watts

A game most famous for its beautiful visuals can be beamed directly into your eyeballs, thanks to some clever modding for the Oculus Rift. Modder Nathan Andrews, who previously worked on Half-Life and Black Mesa mods for the VR device, has started cracking into the CryEngine and produced a neat proof-of-concept video to prove it.

PC Gamer reports that the mod is incomplete, as it lacks things like a crosshair and iron-sights. But he has the mod up and running, at least, in both Crysis and Crysis Wars. He also mentioned that he's ported the mod to CryEngine 3 "if anyone is interested in building a game from the ground up with VR support."

We're probably witnessing the way humanity ends. When aliens are picking over our bodies and wondering how we died, they'll discover it wasn't famine or nuclear war. We all just had VR equipment strapped to our heads and no reason to leave our picturesque tropical islands. Still, what a way to go.

Kotaku





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allowfullscreen="true">

Well, actually not the future. The present. See, when first they announced the Oculus Rift VR headset, I thought, "Oh, virtual reality. I liked The Lawnmower Man. This should be weird."



Then, modder Nathan Andrews got the headset working with Half-Life 2, and I thought, "Oh, wow. Okay. I'd love to use this thing." Now he's done the same thing with the original Crysis, and watching the above video, my feelings are somewhat more refined: "Yep, I still want to play this thing. Also, I miss the first Crysis."



Behold, independent head and arm movement. Nifty. Andrews notes that he hasn't yet modded the crosshairs to track properly, which is why his aiming is a bit off. He's using a Mag II gun controller, which he says works well. If you want to see what it looks like with him wearing it, check out the Half-Life 2 video linked above.



So how far would you guys say we are from full-on Far Cry 3 cybersex here? A month? A couple months? Like, four months?



(H/T PC Gamer)


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