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PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to Crysis 3′s latest trailer tours the innards of its new gun">Crysis 3 Typhoon thumb







After the last video inexplicably decided to be backwards, I was wondering what the gimmick for the next in Crysis 3's 7 Wonders series would be. Maybe it would play upside-down, or entirely in sepia, or be madly rotating like a hyper-violent level of Super Hexagon. Turns out it was none of the above. Instead, we get a somewhat fetishistic view of the game's new Typhoon gun. Think the opening to Fight Club, with sci-fi weaponry replacing Edward Norton's head and face.



From the trailer description: "Meet the Typhoon: one of the world's most lethal weapons, firing 500 rounds a second." Yikes, not even Sasha can manage that much.







The narration is sticking with ridiculously overblown hyperbole then. "It's the purest form of expression" - really? Still, the Typhoon appears to be marvellous at shredding alien/robot things into tiny chunks. I look forward to doing that.



Crysis 3 is due out February 21 in Europe and Australia and February 19 in USA.
Shacknews - Alice O'Connor

Three years after launching, stompy robot Crysis mod MechWarrior: Living Legends has released its very final version. The gang at Wandering Samurai Studios still have more they'd like to do but, alas, their license to use the MechWarrior property is up. So, download Living Legends 0.7.0 and see it out with a plasma blast.

"Over the years, we’ve strived to create the greatest, most innovative Battletech/MechWarrior game ever conceived. We feel our efforts re-inspired faith in the MechWarrior IP and paved the way to show that hard work and perseverance can bring anything to life given enough blood, sweat, and tears," project director 'Defender' wrote in the announcement. "Created by fans, for fans, we present to you this culmination of 6 years of work and whatever else we could slap together in time to release this final update to you; our community."

Patch 0.7.0 brings changes including new mechs and tanks, new HUDs, bug fixes, and balance tweaks. Wandering Samurai also gave a list of features which have been started but shall never be finished now that it's forced to stop. We won't see 16 maps, heaps of mechs of vehicles, several game modes, replacement sounds for all the Crysis assets, and more.

"As Developers and Staff of Wandering Samurai Studios, we are, as of this point, no longer allowed to create future content based on the MechWarrior IP due to legal obligations on behalf of various rights holders," Defender wrote. "These rights holders own the Legally Binding, Non-Transferrable, Non-Commercial License Agreement with Microsoft and as of 2013 will no longer officially support the MechWarrior: Living Legends division of Wandering Samurai Studios."

Even though MechWarrior was a dormant franchise at the time, it was still a surprise when then-rightsholder Microsoft gave Wandering Samurai the license. Now that MechWarrior is getting big again and actually making money, the new owners are probably looking to lock it down. Living Legends stomps similar ground to MechWarrior Online, MechWarrior Tactics is also on the horizon, and MWO developer Piranha is interested in making a single-player MW game too.

Kotaku

The Incredible Art Of Maciej Kuciara, Who's Worked On The Last Of Us, Cyberpunk & CrysisMaciej Kuciara is one of the most talented concept artist on the planet. And you're about to see just why.



He's worked for a number of high-profile companies and clients over the years, including stints at Crytek (Crysis series), CD Projekt (Cyberpunk), Blur (Halo 4's launch trailer) and Naughty Dog (The Last of Us, for which he's been featured here previously).



These days, he's been doing a lot of movie work, for projects like the Wachowski's Jupiter Ascending and Marvel's upcoming Guardians of the Galaxy.



You can see more of Maciej's art at his personal site and CGHub page.





To see the larger pics in all their glory (or, if they're big enough, so you can save them as wallpaper), right-click on them below and select "open in new tab".

Fine Art is a celebration of the work of video game artists, showcasing the best of both their professional and personal portfolios. If you're in the business and have some concept, environment, promotional or character art you'd like to share, drop us a line!



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PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to Crysis 3 trailer explodes in reverse like a hyperviolent Coldplay video">Crysis 3







Crysis' bionic being of pure muscle shoots men back to life in the latest Crysis 3 trailer, which shows a killing spree in reverse for no good reason beyond the fact that it looks funny when he un-kicks a confused guard onto a ledge. If time reversal is a new suit power, Crytek haven't mentioned it, though I imagine a bit of backwards bullet time would be pretty useful if you'd just fluffed an action scene by farting or falling over. Not that that proved any help at all to Chris Martin in Coldplay's 2002 video for The Scientist - a tragic short film about a man who crashes in Grid but lacks the flashbacks to save his girlfriend from death :(



Crysis 3 is out on February 19 in the US, February 21 in Europe and Australia, and March 7 in Japan. Trailer follows.



PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to Crytek: Crysis 4 might not be an FPS">Crysis 3 nock



Prophet's William Tell LARPing session takes a turn for the interesting.



After the glossy trilogy's completion, Crytek could explore other genres for the Crysis franchise. Speaking to Dusty Cartridge, Crytek Producer Michael Read said he believed the don't-call-it-Crysis-4 sequel would keep the saga going, but not necessarily as a shooter.



"I think the Crysis franchise itself has life left in it," Read said. "Whether it’s in a different game type format or whether it’s expanding upon this, it’s hard to say. That’s going to be up to the designers at the end of the day. Crysis was always intended to be a trilogy, and I think that over that time we’ve built a really cool universe. We haven’t really gone in and said, 'Hey, let’s put Nanosuits and clown suits and stuff and completely violate and sell our IP.' We have a lot more life left in that to go back and try some unique stuff. Whether it’s FPS or not I have no idea, but there’s definitely a future in the franchise."



Crytek CEO Cevat Yerli's dedication to solidifying a free-to-play version of Crysis might hint at future releases incorporating similar business models, but the studio hasn't elaborated on its actual design plans. So long as I'm able to continually bewilder Tyler with nothing but an overgrown lawn, I'm up for anything.
PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to Face Off: What was the best decade for PC gaming?">face-off







Face Off pits two gladiators against each other as they tackle gaming's most perplexing conundrums. This New Year's Eve edition is a chronological throw-down: which decade gave PC gaming the most? Podcast Producer Erik Belsaas says it was the '90s—the origin of modern PC gaming. Executive Editor Evan Lahti insists it was the '00s, with its speedy internet, better PCs, and shinier graphics engines.



Evan: The 1990s had the CD-ROM and the McRib sandwich. The ‘00s had Windows XP and two terrible Star Wars movies. I think the latter birthed better games: the Battlefield series, Crysis, Company of Heroes, BioShock, Dragon Age: Origins, Guild Wars, The Sims, Rome: Total War, Star Wars: KOTOR, and the best Civilization games happened then. What've you got, Erik?



Erik: Lucasarts, id, Ion Storm, Interplay, Blizzard: the iconic names that created franchises that we still discuss today. “RTS,” “FPS,” and “MMO” had no meaning before the pioneers of the '90s came along with some-thing other than sequels and rehashes: Baldur's Gate, Wolfenstein 3D, Duke Nukem 3D, MechWarrior, Unreal Tournament and every LucasArts adventure game from Sam & Max to Grim Fandango.



Evan: This is going to devolve into who can name-drop more game titles, isn't it?



Erik: Pretty much.



Evan: Cool. In that case, let’s put the best we've got on the page. What are the top three games from your decade? Mine: WoW, Counter-Strike, and Half-Life 2.



Erik: Just three? How about X-COM, Fallout, and The Secret of Monkey Island. Timeless classics that we still play today.



Evan: Is that the best that the decade that gave us the Spice Girls has got, grandpa? The innovations of the '00s will last far longer. Half-Life 2 wasn't just the basis for the way modern action games tell stories, it’s the technological foundation for the most ambitious mods we have today and the preferred canvas for machinima creators. World of Warcraft’s meteoric rise brought PC gaming into popular culture, ruined innumerable marriages, and earned its own South Park episode. Top that.



Erik:Your great games are all parts of established franchises that began in the '90s. For that matter, the original Counter-Strike mod came out in 1999, before Valve turned it into a retail product! Take away the names that began in the '90s, the '00s would've created very little of their own.



Evan: Megabyte for megabyte, I’d rather replay Half-Life 2 than its predecessor. Likewise for Diablo II, Warcraft III, Fallout 3 and other major franchises that began in the '90s but matured in the '00s. I really think that the tech of the '00s (better operating systems, fast internet, faster PCs) produced better gaming experiences. EVE Online couldn't exist in the '90s. Team Fortress 2's dozens of free content updates couldn't have streamed down our wimpy modems—the same goes for 25-man WoW raids or a heavily modded playthrough of Oblivion or Morrowind.



Erik: You've got a short memory. EverQuest allowed 72-man raids. And before Oblivion and Morrowind came Daggerfall, which was amazing and heavily modded. Doom, the father of modding, came out in '93.



Evan: I’ll play your game, Belsaas. Here's my ace: Deus Ex, our most favorite game ever, happened in 2000.



Erik: Deus Ex is a good game...but how about StarCraft? Has any other game absolutely defined its genre or rallied an entire nation behind it like a sport?







Evan: I was worried you’d play the Korea card. What can I counter that with? The 100-million-selling main-stream success of The Sims? The booming popularity of independent gaming? ...Peggle?



Erik: Peggle? Well I’ve got...you know...uh...Carmen Sandiego. Fine. Peggle wins.
Kotaku

There's A Hilarious Reason They Called The Game Warface



Warface? WARFACE. The people behind one of gaming's most preposterous titles—a free-to-play shooter that somehow manages to combine the words "War" and "Face" without cracking a smile—have explained the rationale behind their decision.



Speaking to Rock Paper Shotgun in a recent Q&A (which is worth a read!), Crytek boss Cevat Yerli answers the most important question of all: why the hell did they call one of their games Warface?




Because I think it's very personal. I think it's a very social experience. Yes, it's a very strange word combination, but I wanted to express that it's a truly social FPS game. It's about war on a different scale—between corporate entities—but also, it's a shooter between you and your friends. That implies so many new kinds of possibilities with the social technology that we've invested over the last five years to build. So that's why we as a company keep going back to "face." It's very personal.




WARFACE: IT'S PERSONAL.


PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to GameFly End of the World sale chops 75 percent off XCOM, Witcher 2, others">GameFly End of the World sale







When facing the end of time as we know it through a cataclysmic prophecy, it's time for a sale to mark history's end with a bang. To wit, GameFly's End of the World event nixes 75 percent off select titles for the next 12 days, providing valuable buys such as a $15/£9 Witcher 2, a $25/£15.50 XCOM: Enemy Unknown, and $12.50/£8 for The Walking Dead, among others.



More games will appear throughout the sale's duration, but current offerings include Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic for $2.50/£1.60, Batman: Arkham Asylum for $10/£6, and Crysis for $7.50/£4.70.



If you haven't yet taken shelter in your fallout bunker cheered at the increasing arrival of awesome holiday sales, Origin's Green Monday sale are still around for just one more day with 40 percent off on tons of noteworthy titles such as Battlefield 3 ($24/£15), Crusader Kings II ($24/£15), and The Sims 3 ($18/£11). Now, if you'll excuse me, I have a couple of asteroid-repelling planks to board up.
PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to Crytek: Free-to-play future “isn’t mutually exclusive”">Crysis 3 Ceph-thrower







Crytek CEO Cevat Yerli's enthusiasm for incorporating burgeoning free-to-play business models into the PC-melting Crysis franchise is about as strong as a nano-maxed punch. Like hunting space squids with a bow and arrow, though, such a marriage takes time. In an interview with Rock, Paper, Shotgun, Yerli believed that the free-to-play future he envisions "won't happen tomorrow" and Prophet-ized a peaceful coexistence between free and fee.



“I don’t think F2P’s a mutually exclusive way of looking at things," he explained. "I mean, the future is definitely free-to-play, but likewise, retail can co-exist with it. Premium games can be free-to-play. When I said free-to-play’s gonna be our future, I meant that and I hold to it. But I didn’t mean it for tomorrow.



"When I say there will inevitably be only free-to-play games, I mean that there might be ones where you can just download them with a free-to-play business model, or you can go to the store and buy it for $60. So that’s what I meant: There’s gonna be free-to-play available, which brings the entry level down to zero from a price perspective.”



Yerli also revealed prior considerations for turning Crysis 2's multiplayer into a free-to-play standalone while packaging Alcatraz's journey as priced content, but the final product wound up combining both in the traditional retail combo. Crysis 3—which de-cloaked its North American February 19/European February 22 release dates today—will follow suit, but Yerli hopes for something a little less spendy in the future.



"My desire is that everybody can just play Crysis and don’t have to spend money from day one," he said. "So people don’t have to think, ‘Oh, do I really want to pay $50 for that game?’ I don’t want that question to be asked. I just want them to be able to give it a try. And then they can make their choices about spending money. That’s honestly why I’m most excited about free-to-play: Regardless of storytelling, single-player, multiplayer, and co-op experiences, I think there’s an answer to all of those problems.”
PC Gamer
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title="Permanent Link to Voting has begun for ModDB’s 2012 Mod of the Year award nominees">moddb







Clear your schedule and make room on your hard drive: there are over 9000 mods up for consideration as ModDB's 2012 Mod of the Year award nominees, and only a little over five days to nominate them. A big green button on each mod's page makes it hard to miss the opportunity to give your favorites a bump.



There isn't much time, so we'll get straight to it after this obligatory acknowledgement that we said "over 9000" on the internet: tee hee, references. Moving on, DayZ and Black Mesa are tough to ignore, and The Sith Lords Restored Content Mod was a valiant community effort. Those might be the most talked about and praised mods this year, and we expect they'll secure nominations, but there are so many more that deserve recognition. Which are you voting for?



If you need a refresher, you might want to browse our recent mod coverage to see if you've missed any driving elephants or My Little Pony conversions.
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