Street psychics. Their blinking neon signs are everywhere, promising love and wealth and happiness. They make a fortune preying on the gullible and milking them dry. So when these victims begin dying and leaving confused spirits behind, it can only take a genuine psychic (and her wayward spirit guide) to clean up the mess.
User reviews: Very Positive (182 reviews)
Release Date: Jan 13, 2012

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Packages that include this game

Buy The Blackwell Bundle

Includes 4 items: Blackwell Convergence, Blackwell Deception, Blackwell Unbound, The Blackwell Legacy

 

Recommended By Curators

"The Blackwell Deception is a very strong addition to the point and click genre. The series definitely one that any fan should have in their collection."
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About This Game

Street psychics. Their blinking neon signs are everywhere, promising love and wealth and happiness. They make a fortune preying on the gullible and milking them dry. So when these victims begin dying and leaving confused spirits behind, it can only take a genuine psychic (and her wayward spirit guide) to clean up the mess.
From seedy downtown nightclubs to penthouse apartments to a luxury yacht on the Hudson River, Rosa and Joey will unearth the truth about the underground world of street psychics. Including some secrets that Joey would rather be left buried.

System Requirements

    • OS:Windows ME or higher
    • Processor:Pentium or higher
    • Memory:64 MB RAM
    • Graphics:640x400, 32-bit colour: 700 Mhz system minimum
    • DirectX®:5.0
    • Hard Drive:350 MB HD space
    • Sound:All DirectX-compatible sound cards
Helpful customer reviews
2 of 2 people (100%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
7.4 hrs on record
Posted: March 20
I am a huge fan of all the blackwell games, and I can honstly say: buy this aswell!

I see they have made some updates on the graphics when it comes to the picture of people who is speaking,but kept the charm of 8-bit on the rest of the game! (me like)

The story is interesting, but I feel the beginning is somehow comfusing, since you're starting right away on a mission (as an intro) and then the text for the intro pops up. (After that ofc, you are free to play the game). I do believe that If you haven't played the other games, or read this, the intro can be kinda confusing. And you will/can be confused about how to do things or play thie game, since there is no tutorial.

Other then that, the game has some (very) small annying parts, were you have to click _exactly_ at the subject you are suppose to click on. If not, they will tell you they can't do anything about it, and you will be misslead and guided to endless wonder on what you need to do next.

Besides this the story and the "puzzles" are pretty good. You ofc, need to think a little, but it's normal logic! :)
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4 of 6 people (67%) found this review helpful
1.2 hrs on record
Posted: January 23
if your into point and clicks adventure games you can't go wrong with the Blackwell series.
they are ghost / detective stories where you'll need to swap between the 2 to hunt for clues.
kinda of serous stories with humor based on dialog between a shy shut in girl and her disgruntled ghost.
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1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
7.1 hrs on record
Posted: May 20
Going back to games I played back in Amiga-days like Monkey Island, Beneath a Steel Sky, and Loom, as well as text adventures like Hitchhikers' Guide to the Galaxy, this holds up really well in comparison, and manages to be quite original into the bargain.

The stories are easy to relate to, as they're set in the real world, and you can easily forgive the sometimes odd quirks or occasionally below-par acting because they're obviously very low-budget and made by a group of likeable, quirky, old-school-imaginative people. Playing the Blackwell games is quite a lot like reading a good book or watching a skilfully-plotted TV or film series.

My favourite game in the series so far, and it seems to be substantially longer, too.
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1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
4.9 hrs on record
Posted: May 16
Here’s a point and click series that has been eight in years in the making. Fortunately, I did not spend eight years waiting to play them all as I started in early 2014, just in time for the last one to be released. The series aging poorly over a such a long time isn’t really an issue here as it’s done in the 90s style of point and click adventures. Pixel graphics, above-par voice acting, items to pick up and most of all, a compelling story.

What do I think? Not bad, not bad at all. The characters draw you into well-written, appropriately voiced, engaging point-and-click adventure. It’s probably one of the most intuitive adventures I’ve played in a while (especially after playing Monkey Island and Sam & Max). It’s also the only point and click adventure I’ve played set in modern times, in the real world. It’s weird to have to think ‘modern’
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1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
5.7 hrs on record
Posted: May 3
Out of all the Blackwell games so far, this one is SIGNIFICANTLY longer. Fans of the story will love to hear that a lot of loose threads from previous Blackwell games start coming together in an awesome way in this installment. "Everything is connected" indeed! The conclusion to this one is rather unexpected and leaves you with that great feeling that the story you're partaking in is every bit as good as tv or film.

As much as I have to praise the great-as-usual story in this installment, I unfortunately have to dock this one a few points in the puzzles department. In the previous Blackwell games, the solutions to puzzles have always for the most part made perfect sense, and you could arrive at the solutions very logically. Deception is the first installment in the Blackwell series where I have felt that some of the solutions to the puzzles involve doing things that you are very unlikely to think of doing... or doing things that past experience has taught you would never work (e.g. what you can and cannot do with the neck tie) or involve factoring in a piece of information that has never mattered in a Blackwell game before and so it doesn't even register as something you should pay attention to (e.g. in ONE case and ONE case only, you need to notice what time of day it appears to be based on the sun in the sky when looking at the map menu... I mean, COME ON. It's a menu, and there is ZERO precedent for that and it never comes up again.)

Basically, some of the solutions in Deception rely not only on the information you've uncovered while investigating (as is usually the case in Blackwell) and instead throw in some some one-off, special case thing that adds a sort of secret hitch to uncovering the next lead. And actually, there is one puzzle in the game where you have to perform a set of actions in a particular sequence, but if you do it in the WRONG sequence on your first try, then the puzzle is completely unsolvable.... there IS a way to reset it by talking to a character at a completely different location, but you have no way of knowing that, so if it happens to you, it is extremely confusing.

Anyway, I don't want to harp on about it too long. Suffice to say, I thought the puzzles were a little more flawed than usual in this installment, but still an excellent game, and the story was as good as ever.
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