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Use your power as a Feudal Lord to unite the land of the Rising Sun under your iron fist.
Release Date: Sep 15, 2011

Buy Sengoku

$9.99

Reviews

“It’s a setting that’s seen rarely in video games. European conflict dominates the strategy landscape and seeing a fresh perspective is very welcome. The fact it’s addictive and enjoyable is even better. This is history made fun.”
8/10 – Strategy Informer

“Sengoku is in every aspect a wonderful simulation of its time, and a historic marvel for strategists.”
9/10 – Gamegrin

“...a game that provide such rich strategic scope that it will very likely be the only game armchair strategists need for the remainder of the year.”
4,5/5 – Digitally Downloaded

About the Game

Sengoku is a deep character driven strategy game set in 16th century Japan. Play as a Japanese nobleman and unite the land of the Rising Sun under your iron fist. Use your military might, your smooth talking tongue, and your guile to increase your power. Watch your enemies fall like cherry blossoms in the early dawn of spring. Doublecross your enemies in an honorable and auspicious manner. Always make sure you have competent heir, if you should die before your destiny has been reached.

Key features

  • Play as a Feudal Japanese Lord and manage your relations with family, friends, and enemies
  • Rise in influence and power inside your clan and then move on to claim the ultimate prize, the control of Japan
  • Conquer and grow while rewarding your most valued retainers as you make a bid to become Shogun
  • Detailed historical map of Japan, divided into over 350 different provinces, during the Warring States era
  • Manage your relations with three different religious factions, the Shinto, the Christians and the Buddhists
  • Employ the aid of powerful Ninja clans when your Samurai armies are not enough

System Requirements

    • OS: Windows XP, Vista, 7
    • Processor: Intel® Pentium® IV 2.4 GHz or AMD 3500+
    • Memory: 2 Gb RAM
    • Hard Disk Space: 2 GB Available HDD Space
    • Video Card: NVIDIA® GeForce 8800 or ATI Radeon® X1900
    • DirectX®: 9.0c
    • Sound: Direct X-compatible sound card
Helpful customer reviews
82 of 84 people (98%) found this review helpful
31 products in account
2 reviews
10.2 hrs on record
A lot of players have called Sengoku a not-quite-Crusader Kings II: something Paradox released when they didn't quite have CKII's system down, but wanted to make money with something they had thus far. People had told me it was mediocre, and so I wasn't interested in spending too much money on it. Recently it went on sale for $2.70, which is about the same amount of money spent on a few Mountain Dew Kickstarts at 7-11, so I decided to try it out, being a lover of strategy games in general and especially the Sengoku Jidai time period.

So is it true that it's like a poor man's CK2? Actually, there's a LOT of truth in this. Sengoku is basically somewhere between CKI and CKII, with elements from both games in the interface and gameplay. You have your nobles, you marry them, have heirs, interact with nobles above and below you (depending on who you play), and improve the desmense you control directly. Unlike in CKII and later Paradox games, you can't go to war with specific regions as a war goal, but you can capture provinces in a war and keep them as soon as peace is made (a bit like how wars of religion happened in CK1).

Warfare is like any other Paradox game, with individual armies battling it out and battles won/lost depending on a combination of numbers and morale. How the morale is decided, I don't know - sometimes I just throw armies at my enemies and hope the little green bar stops going up and down until I win. The AI does that annoying thing that the AI often did in older Paradox games - namely, refusing to try to stop your armies and just meandering around taking empty provinces, leaving their home country wide open or permitting their armies to be surrounded. In the end, I sometimes fought wars like I was dealing with modern armies - ie., lining up several columns of soldiers and charging into my enemy's territory with a line of forces. If you're looking for a Sengoku Jidai game with detailed individual battles, or campaigns that operate like real campaigns do, you would probably do best to invest in the far superior Shogun 2 Total War (or even its predecessor, which is still one of the best TW games in my opinion).

One of the major hang ups with Sengoku is that, because the war aspect is so limited, you rely heavily on court and political gameplay for entertainment - but this is incredibly lacking. Unlike in CK2 (or even CK1, for that matter), where you could spend half the game wheeling and dealing to work your way up the ranks of medieval royalty and politics, and plenty of events permitted you to interact and make use of your character's personal traits, there is not much of that in Sengoku. Generally, the only interaction I had was having to turn down nobles who kept asking for land and funding my kid's education. I'm sure there are some mods out there that add way more events and make court life as interesting as it was in medieval Japan, but as far as the vanilla game goes, it feels almost unfinished. In the end, it comes across more as a CK2 mod someone made, rather than an actual game created and published onto the market.

Do I recommend this game? This is where I wish Steam had a "maybe" option. I put down "Yes" because the game is fun every now and then, or if you want something CK-ish that is set in medieval Japan...but I would not spend too much money on it. Get it when it goes on sale.
Posted: March 25th, 2014
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17 of 18 people (94%) found this review helpful
40 products in account
8 reviews
10.2 hrs on record
This game... oh man this game. It's basically CKII lite set in Japan. That's not necessarily bad, but you will not enjoy this game if you keep comparing it to CKII. Aside from that, it's pretty fun. There are a couple of unique features not found in CKII, such as the Religious Factions system and the goal in this game is pretty clear - Become Shogun of Japan. There aren't flexible starts like in most of Paradox's grand strategy games. Another unique thing about this game is that sieged provinces automatically become yours. That means expansion is quick in this game. That also means that you can lose all of your land pretty easily. This game, although inferior to CKII, is still very fun and interesting. Rewrite history, and unite Japan!
Posted: May 31st, 2014
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5 of 6 people (83%) found this review helpful
28 products in account
3 reviews
13.5 hrs on record
I bought it while it was on sale for 2.49 and I don't regret it whatsoever, I'm hooked. It boasts a massive array of personal, politcal and military tasks for you as the leader of your clan to tackle. Easily worth the purchase; as someone who loves these kind of games I'll be playing for quite some time.
Posted: June 13th, 2014
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2 of 2 people (100%) found this review helpful
106 products in account
11 reviews
130.2 hrs on record
Immersive, Packed full of Content and very in depth, you control many aspects of the regions under your control and the armies at your disposal, if your sons shame you with a poor performance on the battlefield you can have them sent back out or have them gut themself like a fish. Kill family and friends for ♥♥♥♥♥ and giggles or for legitimate political reasons, just beware the backlash.

Honor above all
Loyalty unto Death

8/10 (graphics aren't superb but they are pretty)
Posted: May 20th, 2014
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2 of 2 people (100%) found this review helpful
126 products in account
5 reviews
7.4 hrs on record
poor man's CKII.
It's really all it is.
So if you can't afford CKII, have a large interest in japanese culture, and/or want a game similar to CK this is right up your alley.

NOTE: If you are buying this game for action you will be dissapointed because there is none, go buy shogun 2 if you want that. This game goes by extremely slow and is primarly focused on politics rather than flat out total war. It requires patience, concentration and awards those how take their time and make smart decisions.
Posted: August 7th, 2014
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