Recettear erzählt die Geschichte eines Ladens, der von einem Mädchen bewohnt wird. Die Fee Tear stellt Ihr gesamtes Leben auf den Kopf. Recette Lemongrass ist die Besitzerin des Ladens, der sich in Ihrem Haus befindet. Sie muss die Schulden Ihres Vaters begleichen und die Fee Tear gibt nicht auf ihr dabei zu helfen.
Nutzerreviews: Äußerst positiv (3,136 Reviews)
Veröffentlichung: 10. Sep. 2010

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Recettear: An Item Shop's Tale kaufen

Pakete, die dieses Spiel enthalten

Carpe Fulgur Collection kaufen

Enthält 3 Artikel: Chantelise - A Tale of Two Sisters, Fortune Summoners, Recettear: An Item Shop's Tale

 

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"A charming and beautiful adventure RPG where you are a item shop NPC that has to pay off her debt by exploring dungeons and selling your spoils of war."

Über dieses Spiel

Recettear erzählt die Geschichte eines Ladens, der von einem Mädchen bewohnt wird. Die Fee Tear stellt Ihr gesamtes Leben auf den Kopf. Recette Lemongrass ist die Besitzerin des Ladens, der sich in Ihrem Haus befindet. Sie muss die Schulden Ihres Vaters begleichen und die Fee Tear gibt nicht auf ihr dabei zu helfen. Sie sind Recette und treffen wichtige Entscheidungen wie Warenbeschaffung; ob es nun der nächste Mark in der Stadt ist, den Sie plündern oder ob Sie sogar durch die Wälder ziehen müssen und die Waldtiere um ihre Güter bekämpfen. Sie bestimmen nicht nur über die Preise Ihrer Güter, sondern auch über die Innenausstattung Ihres Ladens. Ständig auf der Suche nach eine einer Lösung, um die Schulden so schnell wie möglich abzuzahlen. Sollten Sie dieses Ziel nicht erreichen, ist in Zukunft ein Pappkarton Ihre Behausung.

Hauptmerkmale:

  • Sie müssen alle Aspekte des Ladens leiten - von Wareneinkauf bis hin zur Dekoration!
  • Entdecken Sie willkürliche Verliese, die niemals so wie beim letzten Mal aussehen!
  • Vielfache Abenteuer zur Auswahl während Sie auf Kerkersuche gehen.
  • Sie haben auch nach Beendigung des Spieles noch zahlreiche Erlebnisse vor sich - fordern Sie sich selbst im Survival Mode heraus oder spielen Sie nach Herzenslust im Endless Mode!
  • Die eingebundene Geschichte, die von Carpe Fulgur übersetzt wurde, stellt die Leute von Pensee vor!

Systemvoraussetzungen

    Minimum:

    • Betriebssystem: Windows XP/Vista/7
    • Prozessor: Pentium 4 1.7 GHz oder Athlon XP 1700+ (oder vergleichbar Prozessor)
    • Speicher: 256 MB RAM (512 empfohlen für Windows Vista und 7)
    • Grafik: DirectX 8.1-kompatible Grafikkarte mit mind. 64 MB Grafikspeicher; Nvidia und ATI Karten wurden getestet (Intel integrierte Grafikchips unter X4000 Serien nicht empfohlen )
    • DirectX®: DirectX 8.1
    • Festplatte: 700 MB frei HD
    • Sound: DirectX 8.1-kompatible Soundkarte/Motherboard-Chip
Hilfreiche Kundenreviews
10 von 10 Personen (100%) fanden dieses Review hilfreich
21.9 Std. insgesamt
Verfasst: 21. Februar
Normal spielt man den Helden, aber hier ist man eine Händlerin, die die Helden ausrüstet oder den Kindern Süßigkeiten verkauft. An sich klingt es langweilig, ist es aber nicht. Jede Woche müssen die Schulden von den Eltern abbezahlt werden, welche später ziemlich hoch sind. Man muss besondere Gegenstände in Dungeons finden, herstellen oder bei Großhändlern günstiger einkaufen. Damit sich gewissen Gegenstände besser verkaufen, sollte man den Shop auch entsprechend einrichten, was sehr nett ist. Für Dungeons heuert man sich einen Söldner an, den man leveln und ausrüsten kann. Es können einige weitere freigeschaltet werden. In den Dungeons steuert man den Söldner und kämpft sich durch die Ebenen und hofft auf gute Beute. Es gibt auch Endgegner, die einem eine nette Strategie abverlangen.

Fazit: Das Spiel macht süchtig und ist mal was anderes!
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74 von 79 Personen (94%) fanden dieses Review hilfreich
1 Person fand dieses Review lustig
18.4 Std. insgesamt
Verfasst: 16. Januar
TL:DR? See Conclusion

NOTE:
I'm reposting some of my old reviews because I adopted an easier to read format (and because for some reason I can't edit my old reviews)

INTRODUCTION:
We all played the Armored Knight, the Raging Barbarian, the Wise Wizard or the cunning Rogue, going into a glorious quest for honor, wealth or fame. But have you ever wondered what's the life of the regular citizen of the fantasy world, specially the all important Item shops who sell you armor, weapons and potions? Well here is Recettear, a game who will answer just that.

Recettear its a retail simulation game with an RPG twist to it. You'll have to maintain your shop, restock your supplies and go on quests along side adventurers and receive items during the adventure. This is, for me, a pretty fresh new take on the genre.

PROS:
+ Lots of Items to sell, both generic shop items and special custom made items by you
+ Well implemented crafting system
+ Customizable and upgradable store which directly affects how many people visit and what kind of people visits. (People who are rich and pay more, or people who will haggle)
+ A lot of interesting characters with varying personalities, traits and abilities.
+ Good time management system where you are constantly under-pressure to either open your store or go raid a dungeon.
+ A surprisingly advanced economy involving supply and demand.
+ Easy enough learning curve.
+ High replayability. Different modes are unlocked after the initial story campaign as well as a new game plus.

CONS:
- Campaign (Story Mode) is short, although New Game+ and other game modes are unlocked later on, it should not be an excuse to totally limit the Story Mode, specially in an RPGish game.
- A bit too simple combat mechanic
- Art Style is not for everyone. This game is clearly made in the Japanese Anime art style which means some people love it while others hate it.
- Character sprites are low resolutions
- No Widescreen Support
- Limited enemy and npc designs: Some of them were clearly just reused and palette swapped
- Restrictive map: There are different areas of the town you can visit but activity in those places are limited and only event triggered. Meaning, visiting a place (ex. Pub) without an event will just be a waste of time.

CONCLUSION:
FUN GAME. Highly recommended to JRPG fans who is looking for a fresh new take on the genre, or those who are genuinely curious what an Item Shop is like.

Although I feel like, given enough time or funding, the developers of this game could have expanded the world and given more complexity on the mechanics that this game is based on. Still, as it is, the game is good and well worth its price.

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44 von 49 Personen (90%) fanden dieses Review hilfreich
3 Personen fanden dieses Review lustig
10.8 Std. insgesamt
Verfasst: 18. Mai
Recettear: An Item Shop's Tale is the story of an item shop, the girl who lives in it, and the fairy who turned her life upside down. A capitalist shop manager with a unique storyline of a girl who is forced to open a shop and to make profit out of hundreds of items and objects in order to repay her missing father's debt or otherwise, her house is taken away from her.

An interesting cute looking game with unique content and gameplay capable of taking players to show off their persuasive skills and fighting abilities during challenging and entertaining dungeon exploration!

Some good and not so good aspects of Recettear

It isn't just another store or shop management game where you simply obtain profit through the act of selling, or buying stuff. Recettear is maybe one of the most unusual store management games out there that mixes in a good catchy main storyline along with some RPG freedom outside of your store.

Why choosing Recettear?

Recettear is an appealing cute looking game, but don't be mistaken by its looks, because Recettear is a game that highly values the importance of your skills as a trader depending on each customer and events currently going on. Recettear manages to successfully mix both simulation and cuteness into one without lacking one another.

Graphics

The weakest point in Recettear is probably its 2D graphics that simply looks too plain, leaving a lot to wish for... and the Japanese anime looking graphics might also be a problem for those who don't like anime.

Music and voice acting

Despite the game being located in the European medieval time period, characters especially the main one, which you will be controlling, say different phrases in Japanese with a cute tone that will enchant you with its loveliness and cuteness! If not, then you might find it annoying or childish.

Game play

Despite the challenge and the cuteness this game has to offer, its game play is extremely interesting with a big diversity of events that occur with the addition of the RPG touch into it. Although, it may become slightly repetitive over time and players will find themselves doing the same thing over and over again for a long period of time without many changes which will make you waste time without reason.

Unless you get attached to the game, this game may become slightly repetitive over time.

User interface/Game Mechanics

Both user interface and game mechanic are simple and easy to learn either by the player self experience within the game, or by the initial tutorial that greatly explains how the game works.

Along with the addition of a business partner that can be used by you to access whatever information you require about your in-game progress and to view your stats resulting in a refreshing way for players to access information they require in the middle of the game.

Difficulty

The difficulty in this game is mostly measured by how well you can persuade your clients into paying the projected price that you have given to them for an item they have requested or vice versa. Most of the times it will be a surprise until you get the hand of it resulting in a pleasant challenging experience.

Price

Despite how unique Recettear can be in mixing multiple genres into one, I personally believe that the current price of 14,99€ is slighty too much due to the simplicity this game has to offer and its low diversity and variety.

Conclusion

I would rate this game 65 out of 100 or 3,3 out of 5,0. A funny cute-looking challenging simulator game capable of pleasing a huge variety of players from completely different game genres.
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34 von 38 Personen (89%) fanden dieses Review hilfreich
1 Person fand dieses Review lustig
21.6 Std. insgesamt
Verfasst: 9. Januar
NOTE: This is a shortened review without screenshots.For my full review, please visit RealGamerReviews

This is the worst game I’ve ever been addicted to.
No, I don’t mean it’s the worst I’ve ever been addicted to a game. I mean this game has the lowest quality-to-addiction rating of any game I’ve ever played.

Setting

You play as Recette Lemongrass, a young girl doing her own thing when suddenly, a fairy named Tear (get it? Recettear) pops up and tells you that not only is your dad missing, but he’s also left a humongous debt that you have to pay off. The fairy then comes up with the bright idea of turning your house into a shop, so that you can earn money to pay off the debt in instalments. Of course, the shock of your missing papa and the huge debt does absolutely nothing to dampen your spirits and enthusiasm. You open your shop without any semblance of despair and carry on earning money for the rest of the game.

Throughout your journey, you’ll meet some very odd and annoying characters that will either help or ridicule you, none of which are particularly memorable or likeable. Thankfully, the game gives you the option to skip all the dialogue (or at least scroll through it really fast).

Gameplay

There are two main gameplay modes available in Recettear – the terrible plain item shop simulator and the repetitive randomly-generated dungeon crawler. Let’s examine these two portions separately.

Firstly, the shop. This is really mundane. You display a bunch of items in your shop and throughout the day, assuming you choose to have your shop open (which takes up ¼ of the time you have for each day), people will come in and buy it. A bartering system exists that allows you to adjust the price depending on how much profit or loss you’re willing to take. If your price is too high however, the spoilt morons in town will get unhappy and leave you without a sale. Successfully selling stuff to the idiots in town will reward you with experience that goes towards your “merchant level”, with bonuses experience awarded if you’re able to chain a few successful sales in a row. Increasing your level opens up additional features that you can play around with. For example, whilst at the very beginning customers can only purchase the items on your (limited) shelves, higher merchant levels will allow customers to request an item from your inventory, sell you items or even order multiple items that they want to pick up on another day. Other bonuses include larger shop sizes, wall/floor/counters/layout customisations and even the option to put a vending machine down, to make all the hassle of selling items just that little bit easier on you.

There are several factors that influence which kinds of customers and how many customers enter your shop. The first way is through your showcase display, also known as the “table-next-to-the-window-that-people-can-see-from-outside”. You want people to look at the junk on your table and think “Damn, I wanna go in there!” So your first instinct is to put all your expensive, high-in-demand stuff on that table, but by doing so you risk alienating the poor little girl that can’t afford anything. So in the end I have no god damn clue how you’re meant to attract the most people. The second way to influence everything is by changing the walls, floor, counters and so on in your shop, which is collectively referred to as the “store atmosphere”. I’m not 100% sure of how it works, but I imagine light and gaudy things attract little girls that can’t afford anything and call you a big meanie poo for marking up the price even slightly, and the more plain and dark ones stores some other weird population. Who knows?

So where do you get the items that you sell? Well there’s two ways to get your hands on some goodies. The first one is to buy them in town, either from the Market or the Merchant’s Guild. It works just like real life – buy low, sell high. Every so often you’ll hear a news bulletin saying that the cost of this is temporarily decreased and the price of this other thing is increased. It doesn’t take a genius to figure out how to approach the situation.

The other main method of obtaining items (which incidentally also makes up the remainder of the game) involves dungeon-crawling. Rather than having your useless little girl go out and magically have the ability to fight, the game allows you to visit the “Adventurer’s guild”, in which you pick from a number of heroes-for-hire who will go do the dungeon-crawling for you. Once you’ve made your choice, you take control of whichever hero you pick and embark on what has to be the most monotonous and tedious dungeon-crawling game in existence. If repeatedly killing incredibly inspired and original enemies such as slimes, bats and bunny rabbits appeals to you in any way then, boy, you’re in for a treat. Each level is set out so that there’s a number of chests, enemies and a goal to get to, which takes you to the next level. Every 5 levels, you’ll generally encounter a boss battle.

Did I say it was monotonous and tedious? Because it is. You’ll encounter the same enemies over and over again (with slight variations from time to time). None of the boss fights are particularly interesting or challenging and although you do eventually unlock a handful of different adventurers to choose from, all of them are limited to a maximum of three abilities, none of which are particularly impressive.

Whilst torturing yourself in the dungeons does reward some goodies for you to sell, the main purpose of dungeon-crawling is actually to collect ingredients, which can be used to craft (or “fuse”) better items or equipment.
Every week or so, you’ll be forced to pay off a part of your loan. This begins at 10,000 pix (the currency used in the game) and increases exponentially for every week that passes. If at any point you fail to pay up, the game is over and you’ll restart. This would be horrible except for the fact that you restart with all of your items and upgrades. As a result, losing the game just makes it infinitely easier next time.

For those that have paid off their debt and want more for whatever reason, you’re in luck – The game allows you to play on in endless mode, start again in New Game + mode or even a survival mode, where the debt keeps becoming exponentially larger until you get overwhelmed.

All in all, there’s a lot of “game” to be had here, although whether or not you enjoy what you’re playing is another matter altogether.

Presentation
To be honest, the game looks like an early PS2/Dreamcast-era game. There’s no support for wide-screen or any resolution higher than 1280x960. The aesthetic is certainly cute, but otherwise unremarkable. Also worth noting is the fact that alt-tabbing appeared to glitch the games graphics so that one half or more of the screen is completely whited out when selling items. I can’t say for sure if that happens to anyone else though.

The music is adequate but also unremarkable. I’d liken it to a poor man’s version of the music in Pokemon games.

Overall

Despite crapping all over this game in this review, it’s the intangibles that really matter. For whatever reason, despite all its flaws, Recettear was a stupendously addictive game that I just couldn’t put down. It takes a bunch of repetitive, unoriginal and uninteresting ideas and meshes them into a unique game I both love and hate simultaneously. All that said, I do recommend that you give it a try, because if nothing else, it really is a unique title and one that you should experience for yourself.
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28 von 36 Personen (78%) fanden dieses Review hilfreich
1 Person fand dieses Review lustig
67.2 Std. insgesamt
Verfasst: 21. März
Schmooley Benjamin Kippelfinkelburg ben Shekelstein was not a proper Jew, and could not fulfill the role of his ancestors in serving as a source of legal credit for French nobles and royals seeking to fund their personal ventures via circumvention of Church authority.

Amassing significant debts on his (loaned) property after the subprime mortgage bubble bursted in 1599, and lacking even basic skills in the trade of counting shekels, he set out to make his fortune, only to die somewhere in the mountains offscreen, leaving his only daughter, Recette-Anne Frank Shekel Israel Lemonfresh ben Shekelstein, to inherit responsibility for virtually all of his debts. The rabbi of the city's quarter, Isaac Schlomo Goldstein Shekelburg ben Levi Abraham Cohen, on behalf of the Goyim and with the help of the cult of Satan and the blood of seven gentile children, then invokes the Kabbalistic Sephirot to summon a Jew fairy, of whom is promptly dispatched to Recette, both to collect the outstanding debts according to a strict timetable, and to teach her the art of counting shekels, stowing gold bricks under the floorboards (and in the walls), acquiring the role of an extremely convenient scapegoat, and shortchanging customers like a proper Le Happy Venetian Merchant.

Loli Jew Recette learns to contradict basic merchant guild regulations in 17th-century France, engages in the unholy act of ritual blood libel during Passover, exploits her incompetent Swiss mercenaries by paying them to risk their lives picking up valuable consumer goods in the dangerous wilds (and then reselling said items to those same people at a profit), and invents the free market and 9/11 in the process. You'll have hours of fun wondering where in your house you hid all those millions of shekels (called "pix" in the English translation) prior to the game's start, as well as by selling candy to the goyim girls and that one Irish elf for the equivalent of a small fortune. If you can't make your payments on time, however, the rabbi will charge you a pound of your own flesh per shekel as collateral, effectively making your life forfeit if you fail to live up to proper Mosaic community standards of personal and fiscal responsibility within the quarter.

9/10 shekels plus one pound of flesh/10.
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