Approximately 20 years after the events depicted in Deus Ex, The World is only beginning to recover from a Catastrophic worldwide depression. In the Chaotic period of recovery, several religious and political factions see an opportunity to re-shape a worldwide government to their agendas, understanding that the right moves now could...
User reviews: Mixed (430 reviews)
Release Date: Mar 5, 2004

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April 8

Deus Ex: Mankind Divided



Hey everyone!

We are extremely proud and excited to present you today with the announcement trailer for Deus Ex: Mankind Divided, which is coming soon on PC. Switch off the lights, turn up the volume and make sure to watch it in full screen and 1080p!

Watch it on the Steam page.

Let us know what you think so far – we're looking forward to reading your comments. Thanks for your support!

8 comments Read more

Deus Ex Mankind Divided announced!

About This Game

Approximately 20 years after the events depicted in Deus Ex, The World is only beginning to recover from a Catastrophic worldwide depression. In the Chaotic period of recovery, several religious and political factions see an opportunity to re-shape a worldwide government to their agendas, understanding that the right moves now could determine the shape of human society for decades — even centuries — to come. In this techno-nightmare, take part in the dark struggle to raise the world from its own ashes.
  • Dynamic and innovative 1st person-action/adventure brings a level of reality unprecedented in a videogame.
  • Biotech modifications allow players to see through walls, leap 40 feet into the air, regenerate critical body damage or render yourself radar invisible.
  • Globe-hop to real world locations such as Seattle, Antarctica, and Cairo.
  • Cunning stealth gameplay, with darkness and sound affecting enemy awareness.
  • Variable gameplay offers multiple solutions to problems and support for varying stylistic approaches.
  • Non-lethal, non-violent resolution to conflict, allowing players to make ethical statements through their actions.
  • The player's progress through the game is supported by an unprecedented freedom of action by a dynamic, non-linear story with responsive plot branches.

System Requirements

    Minimum:
    • IBM PC or 100% compatible
    • Microsoft Windows 2000/XP
    • Pentium IV, 1.3GHz (Or AMD Athlon XP equivalent) processor
    • 100% DirectX 9 32MB 3D Accelerated video card with Pixel Shader v1.1 Capability
    • 256 MB System RAM
    • 100% DirectX 9 Compatible Sound Card
    • 2GB free uncompressed hard drive space (additional space may be necessary for saved games)
    • 100% Windows 2000/XP compatible Mouse and Keyboard
      Recommended:
      • Pentium IV, 1.5 Ghz (or AMD Athlon XPequivalent) or greater processor
      • 512 MB System RAM
      • 100% DirectX 9 128MB 3D Graphics Card
      • 2GB of Hard Drive Space
      Supported Video Chipsets:
      nVidia GeForce 3Ti/4Ti/FX - Note: GeForce MX series is NOT SUPPORTED. ATI Radeon 8500/9xxx or higher.
Helpful customer reviews
51 of 61 people (84%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
4.8 hrs on record
Posted: January 9
If this were its own game rather than a sequel it wouldn't have such a negative reputation.
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51 of 72 people (71%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
2.9 hrs on record
Posted: December 5, 2014
Grossly underrated. It's a non-linear game where you can literally kill every single NPC you meet, even story-important ones, and even children, without resulting in a non-standard gameover or a plot failure. Also, some NPCs treat you differently and offer different quests according to your gender. Great example of player freedom in a video game.
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37 of 49 people (76%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
0.4 hrs on record
Posted: March 15
Best A-Hole simulator on the market. You start the game with everyone in default poser poses, with their hands awkwardly out to their sides. They slightly bend at the waist when you pick up a mini fridge and throw it at them. Walking into a medical bed causes it to instantly flip over. You can smash various sizes of vases over people's heads and they respond with comments like "Are you okay". Me? You just took a Ming Dynasty era vase to the head, I should be asking if you're okay. I can't figure out how to get out of the first level, but I have successfully knocked everything over and hit everyone with chairs. As far as I'm concerned, I beat the game.
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13 of 17 people (76%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
12.2 hrs on record
Posted: April 14
The original Deus Ex is one of the best games ever made, so when Invisible War suffers from a bad reputation, I assumed it was undeserved. I assumed that it would at least be "pretty ok", and that its poor ratings were due to people comparing it to the first game. Holy cow, was I wrong.

This game is atrociously bad, and not just compared to its older brother. It's genuinely a waste of time and money completely by itself. In short: Had I known how frustratingly bad Invisible War was, I wouldn't even have picked it up for free.

Some of the bad parts (no real spoilers):

- The writing. While the story builds on Deus Ex, you get no build-up, no twists (excepting a few incredibly obvious attempts), no suspense, no room for wondering or doubting. You're never allowed to be curious about the world, the backstory or the events of the past, as most of this is just dumped bluntly at your feet. At one point you walk into a bunker, find some high-level people, and out of nowhere these complete strangers start telling you about their deepest, darkest secrets.

- The pacing. At times, people will warn you that "someone has a secret agenda for you", and you can be certain that within two minutes that same "someone" will give you a call to explain their agenda for you, right to your face.

- The level design. Pretty much every single level is a tiny, cramped area. For reference, the 'ton Hotel in Deus Ex is one of the smaller levels in that game, but it would easily fit in as one of the larger levels in Invisible War. This means you'll enjoy a lot more loading screens a lot more often, but it also makes the game feel so much more shallow: When security HQ is 15 meters from the doorstep of the terrorists, suspension of disbelief drops like a rock. It also means walking through four levels blasting bad guys, then walking back through four empty levels.

- The loading screens. Loading time is usually not an issue for me, with a fast SSD in a fast PC. Invisible War doesn't care. Every so often it goes through a complicated series of steps to load a new level, which includes shutting down the rendering engine to flash you your desktop for a few seconds, then going all white for a while as it restarts, and then it starts actually loading, which takes another 10-15 seconds.

- The number of loading screens. In one typical part of the game, you go through a door - loading screen - across a square - loading screen - across a room to talk to someone, then back out - loading screen - around a corner and down a street - loading screen - down some stairs, talk to a guy, and then retrace the whole route with all the loading screens all over again. Steam tells me I've had the game running some 12 hours, but my save game clock tells me I have 7,5 hours playtime. Including a little menu browsing, that means I have likely spent a quarter of my ingame time looking at loading screens.

- The AI. It is so bad it can sometimes be an involuntary source of rare fun. At one point, members of two opposing factions are involved in a firefight, while a couple of guards stroll idly through the crossfire, taking no notice. As the fight ends, the same guards suddenly freak out over the bodies at their feet - "Ah! A body! There's been a murder! You won't get away with this", they exclaim, and then just keep walking. On a different occasion, an NPC shoots another NPC, and then freaks out over the body *which he just made*. "There's been a murder!" - no, really? And that's saying nothing of the shoddy combat AI, nor the incredibly poor search AI. You can actually hide from enemies by standing on the other side of a glass door, or by closing an air vent cover, and they will have no idea where you went.

- Graphics – and I don't mean "it's ugly", I mean it's really poorly designed. Most weapons are close to identical both when equipped and as inventory icons. With a few exceptions, it's hard to tell what things you can pick up in the field really is (except blinky and futuristic). Are those credit chips, datacubes, or maybe weapon modifications? Who knows! Better break into this locker to find out.

- User interface. Of all the compromises made to make this game possible to run for its intended Xbox, this is likely the worst. Honestly, the UI of Invisible War is worse than trying to do internet banking with a broken gamepad.

I could go on for a long time - this is in no way a complete list - but honestly, if you still think it "can't be that bad", go right ahead and buy it. Or save your money, go on YouTube and find a "let's play" video. I enjoyed some 25 hours of fun on my last Deus Ex playthrough. In Invisible War, it took me less than 8 hours to reach the 2nd to last level. Then I just decided I couldn't be bothered, uninstalled it, and would rather just read about the ending than suffer through more.
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16 of 24 people (67%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
22.0 hrs on record
Posted: January 20
This game isn't SO bad. It's just ok and mediocre. It's a watered down, shortened version of the original Deus Ex. That being said, there are a couple of things that made this game worth playing through.

PROS
+ The freedom of choice is fairly broad and there are different ways to complete various objectives.
+ Fairly good story/Interesting to see the world post Deus Ex 1.
+ Good amount of missions per area to keep you busy.
+ NG Resonance Holo-Sim is waifu material.

CONS
- Mechanics from the first game became overly simplified (Guns/ammo, biomods, keycodes, locks, etc).
- Characters are not interesting.
- Stealth and combat are hit and miss.
- HUD is atrocious.
- Loading screens everywhere.
- Game can be a pain to get running correctly sometimes.

One thing I really want to comment on is the fact that I've had this game crash on me numerous times for the most random of reasons. I still don't know what was causing them or what fixed them, it just happens. It also seems to take up an obscene amount of computer processing power/memory for a game made over a decade ago.

It's not a terrible game per se, it's just not the follow up one would hope for after Deus Ex. I played through this because I was curious of the what the world was like after the events of the first game and that alone was what carried me through it. That and NG Resonance Holo-Sim.

6/10
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5 of 6 people (83%) found this review helpful
11.8 hrs on record
Posted: March 27
Not a bad game, but a disappointing Deus Ex Sequel. Smaller levels, character customization and upgrading system (biomodification) feels more constrained and limited. Level design is still fun and open ended, but not nearly as complex and interesting as the first game. The writing, and specifically for dialogue, is often very poor. Also, though this is a personal preference, the futuristic cyberpunky feel doesn't work nearly as well as the more grounded and realistic Deus Ex 1 version of a dystopian future, that's near enough to happen soon. Deus Ex Invisible War feels more like just a sci-fi game. But it's still a fun game, you can still sneak or kill people, you can still choose factions and there are multiple endings, and you can still upgrade your character with cool abilities. And it looks better than Deus Ex 1. 7/10? 6.5? Get it when it's on sale. Got it for 1 pound. It's definitely worth 1 pound.
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6 of 8 people (75%) found this review helpful
2.4 hrs on record
Posted: April 9
I am kind of disappointed with this installment in the Deus Ex franchise, and not because of the content of the game. The content is fine enough. Visuals are beautiful, music that I've heard so far is nice, and the non-linear Deus Ex approach to tasks is definitely there.

It's just the way the software is put together is bad. The levels are broken into lots of smaller sections, with constant loading screens in between. Sometimes to get from one area of town to another, you'd have to go through 3 loading screens. That's not fun at all and horribly breaks the immersion. To add to the wound, the game crashes at times for no obvious reason at all. I am now unable to make progress because of that.

It's a pity really, because the game seems promising and decent enough. Not quite up to the same standard as the original and Human Revolution, but reasonably good enough aside from the crashes and loading screens. Unfortunately in its current state, I can't recommend it.
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3 of 3 people (100%) found this review helpful
1.3 hrs on record
Posted: May 29
Being a huge fan of the Deus Ex series, I had high hopes going into Deus Ex: Invisible War. The story starts off with Alex, an Orphan, raised by a couple in Chicago and put into a special schoolfor gifted children, where she eventually found her way into the Taurus program, a human augmentation program. You start off being attacked by religious fanatics and are given both sides point of view, with each side trying to persuade you the other is the real threat. Interesting story, I like the concept and it had be playing for over an hour, when I only intended a short demo for the review. It appears to further the Deus Ex Canon, and while it has all the wonderful potential of a Deus Ex game, I will warn you now there are bugs.

First of all, every time the game wants to load a new area, It jumps back to your desktop for a a few seconds and the resolution change makes your desktop appear to be supersized. It does this a lot. The graphics are not quite up to par for a sequel to Deus Ex, but it is passable. The game almost has a feel as though it were rushed or poorly ported from a handheld or console. I think it would be a prime candidate for a reboot, as it was interesting. All in all I will recommend it, but only to those who are familiar with the Deus Ex series, so as to acquire this piece of Deus Ex Canon for your collection. Otherwise, if you are looking for a quality game, and don't care about the series, the Original is great, and Deus Ex: Human Revolution is fantastic. Either way, the series is solid.
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9 of 15 people (60%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
1.0 hrs on record
Posted: March 9
Back in it's day, Invisible War was amazing with the ability to interact and pick up objects and rag doll physics. I use to love picking up burning barrels and placing them too close to NPC's and watching them burn to death without myself being impicated. Ahh, fond memories. This game is a lot of fun and holds a very special place in my gaming heart forever.
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9 of 15 people (60%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
4.4 hrs on record
Posted: April 9
A would-be great game which suffers from conditions known as modern compatibility issues, crashes, abysmal inventory space, a short story length, a bloated amount of items, pointless money, and loading screens. I wish that this game didn't have to be so badly butchered to fit on an XBOX.
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12 of 21 people (57%) found this review helpful
2 people found this review funny
0.7 hrs on record
Posted: March 1
My Adventure with DX:IW

TL:DR Version: Couldn't even get it to run, compatibility issues abound, don't waste your money.


I really wanted to play this game having just finished the original Deus Ex and Human Revolution and loving them both. I know this game has gotten a lot of hate so I wanted to see if it really stood for it or if that was just the angry nostalgia talking...

Too bad I was never able to find out.

Right off the bat the game wouldn't run, it would sit on a black screen and do nothing as task manager repeatedly warned that it was not responding. Eventually I found a fix for that and was able to get it started, and thought I was on the road to beginning the game, but a short time and an intro cutscene later the game threw my hopes of that out the window. I was able to choose my character and clicked the done button and then I was greeted by another black screen. I ended the task and the game refused to let my resolution go back to normal. After I went and manually turned it back, the game randomly decided to start back up, and I was thrust into the first level. I went through it and got to the next level, and again, another black screen. This one wouldn't go away no matter what I did. I searched forums and tried all sorts of "fixes" but none of them worked: compatibility settings, resolution changes, "fixed" start exes, even changing the affinity of the exe to a single core. None of these things worked. The only thing I didn't try that people said worked was a compatibility problem with Realtek audio drivers...which I wasn't about to uninstall all of my audio to run this game. Not worth it. So, having never gotten to play the game except for the first "level," I have to not recommend this game simply for it's horrible compatibility problems.
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3 of 4 people (75%) found this review helpful
0.7 hrs on record
Posted: December 8, 2014
It would be a lot better game if it was PLAYABLE.

Unfortunately, extremely poor porting for Windows makes this nighly impossible without downloading some "tweaks" and such.
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3 of 4 people (75%) found this review helpful
0.3 hrs on record
Posted: March 21
I like the actual game (played a long time ago), but I can't play this as this port DOES NOT WORK.
Please avoid this, do not buy it even if it is 14 cents, your hardware supporting this game is a complete crapshoot, just avoid it.
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4 of 6 people (67%) found this review helpful
10.9 hrs on record
Posted: March 19
If this game has taught me anything, it is to take what others say with a grain of salt. I went into this expecting an experience akin to that of arm wrestling with a chainsaw, but I guess that everyone's talk of this game lowered my expectations to unreasonable depths. Invisible War is, while not as good as its predecessor, a good game.

A big complaint I notice is the "consolization", the clear downgrade in many aspects of the overall design of the first game, including large levels, complex controls, dynamic damage, skills, and swimming. (The multiplayer is gone as well.) There is a lack of control options, which correlated directly to removal of leaning, reduced toolbelt size and biomod (augmentation) slots, and an ugly HUD. As for the size of areas, I would chalk that up to incredibly sloppy coding and graphics that were ahead of their time. One might look at the game's system requirements and then remember that this released in North America in 2003. However, as far as I'm concerned, it is still little excuse; The smaller areas force a different style of gameplay, and the frequency and time of the loading screens is just annoying.

Atmosphere-wise, there is nothing wrong. The graphics are great, and the story, a direct sequel, I would say surpasses that of the original, at least in terms of depth. In terms of how memorable the characters are... eh, I don't really have much to say. Open-ended missions change the flow of the game. Rather than being given one main objective at a time a la the first game, the player is given multiple objectives from warring factions that ultimately branch to the end, and make the ending seem like more of a result of the path taken throughout the game, rather than a rushed decision made at the last minute, though the latter is certainly still possible should you enjoy being chaotic in choosing your allies.

Sadly, if the story is more open than the original, the same cannot be said for weapons and inventory management. Multitools and lockpicks are now one and the same. Items now only take up one slot each, so there is no need for inventory Tetris, but the small size can only be increased by installing and upgrading a specific biomod. Food can be stacked regardless of the type. Firearms have universal ammo, which I saw to be a self-defeating mechanism. In the original Deus Ex, running out of ammo for a weapon forced me to rethink my entire combat strategy and apply it until I could renew my supplies. Here, run out for one gun, you run out for just about everything else. On top of that, weapons can only take two mods at a time, and mods cannot be removed once applied.

Even with a decent variety of weapons, I found little point to using nonlethal tactics. At least during the first few hours of the first game, you would get reprimanded for it. Here, there is almost never a reason to not just kill enemies on the spot. Even when I do use a nonlethal weapon, the game treats the character as having died, and he or she will not appear again. The small area sizes, while not too restrictive, encourage more aggressive gameplay by giving very limited options as to approach.

The player has fewer biomods/augmentations at one time. Luckily, many of the classics are here, as well as some new ones to compensate for the ones which were pulled. The best change here is having three to choose from for any specific slot, and the ability to change between them should you have the materials. It's a fine way to keep the player from restarting when he's realized that the combination he's chosen to go with is ineffective.

I'm certain I've left something out, but this review has to end sometime. Even with all of its simplification problems, it manages to cling enough to the core Deus Ex gameplay. I plan on coming back to this sometime in the future, as I'm certain there's a lot more for me to discover, and the mission structure provides a great deal of replay value. Methinks people would treat this game better were it not called Deus Ex, but as it stands, Invisible War is a fine addition to the series.
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4 of 6 people (67%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
1.2 hrs on record
Posted: April 21
Game keep crashes.
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1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
9.4 hrs on record
Posted: May 10
Deus Ex: Invisible War is a game that, in my opinion, receives WAY too much flak. Ok, it's not on the EXACT same level as the original, but the game is a must-buy for any true fan of the Deus Ex franchise. The gameplay is fun, challenging on occasion as it should be, and the story is very in-depth, as you would come to expect, with many Datacubes and News Terminals to hear about the world from. Other than the gripes outlined below, I can see no reason that this game gets as much crap as it does.

#1 - The interface. It's just flat-out not as good as the original.
#2 - Stability. I've not technically beaten this game yet. I only just now reached the abandoned VersaLife base near the end of the game, and I've been completely stopped dead in my tracks as far as Progression is concerned. I've been trying for little over 40 minutes now, and I crash almost every 1-2 minutes, or whenever I try to headshot someone with my sniper rifle.
#3 - The Universal Ammo system. I shouldn't need to explain this one, but it essentially makes it very hard to have more than one weapon. I for one carry many different weapons, including a Silenced Pistol/Sniper Rifle, Shotgun, and a SMG. Shared ammo just doesn't work in a game like this.
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3 of 5 people (60%) found this review helpful
8.1 hrs on record
Posted: December 26, 2014
This piece of crap crashes everytime I enter the WTO. Don't waste your money
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6 of 12 people (50%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
0.5 hrs on record
Posted: February 10
Nice story, nice RPG, and fullness Sci-fi Fantasy. Good graphic for 2004 game.
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3 of 6 people (50%) found this review helpful
19.4 hrs on record
Posted: March 25
it's not that great, but it's not bad enough to skip either
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297 of 337 people (88%) found this review helpful
30 people found this review funny
5.4 hrs on record
Posted: September 27, 2014
This game is... interesting. So interesting, in fact, that I would recomend playing the original game, skipping this title completely, and then playing Human Revolution. Anyway, if you care about my opinion, read on! Otherwise, I hope you have a nice day anyway.

As far as ambiance goes it is reminiscent of the original game. The dark and oppressive cityscape, the futuristic techno music, the neo-noir use of shadows and, of course, the color blue.

The one improvement this game has over it's predecesor is the ragdoll mechanic. Stuffing the limp bodies of victims into the ventillation grates is more entertaining than the story itself.

This, of course, leads into the story. I played this game for about five and a half hours. In that amount of time in the first game, I stopped numerous political terrorist plots, took out some nasty drug dealers, saved a girl from a pimp and many, many other things. I definitely felt like I was making a positive difference in the world.
In the first five hours of this game, I escaped from a bizarre super-soldier training prison that was under attack from generic religous terrorists and then wandered around for a while fighting mercenaries, killing random gang members, discovering that the terrorists were purposefully religously generic, cheated in some illeagel gambling, burglarized some rich dude's apartment, and wrecked a coffee shop. I felt like a roving psychopath.

In the first game, I felt torn between the urgency of completing the story missions and helping people by completing the side quests.
In this game I felt like there was something I was supposed to be doing, but I had no idea what that thing was or if it even mattered.

The first game eventually gives you a sense of moral ambiguity; over time you learn more and more about all the factions competing with each other and also that every side does varying amounts of honorable as well as evil actions. Aligning with a certain side doesn't make you feel any better than the other side, but you just feel like you need to go with the lesser evil in order to save humanity.
This game gives you an immediate feeling of moral ambivolence. You discover within the first hour that every faction you've encountered has a mixture of good and bad intentions which culminate in stupidity. There is no urgency. These people are just going to fight amongst each other for ambiguous reasons and they want to draw you into it. At that point I figured I'd just go and see if there was anything remotely interesting happening elsewhere. Cheat in some underground mutant lizard fighting betting? Why not. Get involved in a feud between rival coffee chains? Sure! It's more interesting than helping the Orwellian police force fight some self righteous murderers.

Last and perhaps least, we have the player character. In the first game, you get to be the badass JC. Do you think his baggy coat is unnecessary and it's ridiculous that he wears sunglasses at night? He could not care less about your opinion. If you order him to do something he thinks is questionable, he will not blindly follow your orders. He will do what he thinks is right, and he will go about it however he wants. Playing as him, you feel like an awesome futuristic warrior as you gradually upgrade his nanotech and acquire new and better equipment.
In this game, you are Alex. His/her character was not developed at all in the time that I played. All in all, (s)he pretty much just lets the different factions tell him/her what to do with very little (if any) question or objection. Truely, a compelling character. Playing as this wimp, you get a bunch of weapons and upgrades almost immediately and not much of anything to do with them.

This game is not technically good. It is not even that fun. As an experience, it's a mediocre spiral into the depths of a deranged world. The prequel is amazing, and the first game is a masterpiece. This sequel is ultimately disappointing. It is basically just one of the many Godfather 3's of the game industry.

This is all, of course, just my opinion and I sincerely thank you for reading it. I hope it was helpful. Have a nice day!
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