Approximately 20 years after the events depicted in Deus Ex, The World is only beginning to recover from a Catastrophic worldwide depression. In the Chaotic period of recovery, several religious and political factions see an opportunity to re-shape a worldwide government to their agendas, understanding that the right moves now could...
User reviews:
Overall:
Mixed (605 reviews) - 59% of the 605 user reviews for this game are positive.
Release Date: Mar 5, 2004

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About This Game

Approximately 20 years after the events depicted in Deus Ex, The World is only beginning to recover from a Catastrophic worldwide depression. In the Chaotic period of recovery, several religious and political factions see an opportunity to re-shape a worldwide government to their agendas, understanding that the right moves now could determine the shape of human society for decades — even centuries — to come. In this techno-nightmare, take part in the dark struggle to raise the world from its own ashes.
  • Dynamic and innovative 1st person-action/adventure brings a level of reality unprecedented in a videogame.
  • Biotech modifications allow players to see through walls, leap 40 feet into the air, regenerate critical body damage or render yourself radar invisible.
  • Globe-hop to real world locations such as Seattle, Antarctica, and Cairo.
  • Cunning stealth gameplay, with darkness and sound affecting enemy awareness.
  • Variable gameplay offers multiple solutions to problems and support for varying stylistic approaches.
  • Non-lethal, non-violent resolution to conflict, allowing players to make ethical statements through their actions.
  • The player's progress through the game is supported by an unprecedented freedom of action by a dynamic, non-linear story with responsive plot branches.

System Requirements

    Minimum:
    • IBM PC or 100% compatible
    • Microsoft Windows 2000/XP
    • Pentium IV, 1.3GHz (Or AMD Athlon XP equivalent) processor
    • 100% DirectX 9 32MB 3D Accelerated video card with Pixel Shader v1.1 Capability
    • 256 MB System RAM
    • 100% DirectX 9 Compatible Sound Card
    • 2GB free uncompressed hard drive space (additional space may be necessary for saved games)
    • 100% Windows 2000/XP compatible Mouse and Keyboard
      Recommended:
      • Pentium IV, 1.5 Ghz (or AMD Athlon XPequivalent) or greater processor
      • 512 MB System RAM
      • 100% DirectX 9 128MB 3D Graphics Card
      • 2GB of Hard Drive Space
      Supported Video Chipsets:
      nVidia GeForce 3Ti/4Ti/FX - Note: GeForce MX series is NOT SUPPORTED. ATI Radeon 8500/9xxx or higher.
Helpful customer reviews
29 of 33 people (88%) found this review helpful
13.6 hrs on record
Posted: January 19
Despite having its flaws, i find deus ex invisible war to be rather enjoyable, its definately not better than the first, but its still a great game in its own right.

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18 of 21 people (86%) found this review helpful
1.0 hrs on record
Posted: November 21, 2015
I liked the game series in general but Deus ex invisible war wasn't as good as the original. It has an interesting storyline and its original xbox counterpart was good. It has some pretty interesting physics and it can be abit challenging at times but that makes the game fun. I find that sometimes it will load for a while but I guess that always depends on the pc you are using. Overall this is a good game and I would recomend it if you like the Deus Ex series.
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24 of 33 people (73%) found this review helpful
3 people found this review funny
24.5 hrs on record
Posted: February 12
While Deus Ex: Invisible War isn't a godawful game by itself, it's decidedly so in comparison to the original Deus Ex - and for that matter I'd guess it's worse than Human Revolution, too. I really, really wish Steam reviews had a 'mixed' option, because I can't recommend IW over those two games except for series completionists or dedicated genre fans.

Seriously, I had to try twice to beat this game. I lost motivation on my first attempt because of how aggressively blah it gets.


I'm not one to complain about games being "dumbed down", and the original wasn't exactly an ergonomic masterpiece, but Invisible War was designed for the original Xbox in mind. That means they cut out and/or simplified a lot: skills, aug slots, lockpicks, hacking, keycodes & damage models. With the removal of a lot of what made the original distinctive, IW essentially becomes almost a straight FPS. Small, weirdly-designed maps (albeit with some interesting ideas here and there) & a smaller, awkward inventory - with no dragging even - don't do it any favors either. That's not mentioning the bugs, general instability or handicapped AI.

The unified ammo system is nice in theory, but in practice it becomes annoying. You can only carry up to around 9 or so clips, and ammo is rather scarce for players who use a number of weapons regularly. If you chew through most of them with one weapon, you might not have enough for another weapon when you need it. That said, it makes ammo and stealth that much more valuable and worth hunting for/investing in, so that's something. Combat controls themselves are a bit more smooth than DX's, if you ignore the floaty mouse movement, but they're not quite as satisfying and the engine makes fights janky as hell anyway.

On that note, the controls are somewhat more streamlined than the original and yet somehow more clunky to use, mainly because of the fact that it was designed for use with an Xbox controller: again, no clicking and dragging. I missed leaning and I especially missed conversation transcriptions - it's difficult enough following the plot here without being distracted when someone contacts you over your infolink. I'm on the fence about the fact that you can choose any aug from any canister, but that there are also two separate types of canisters. Ragdoll physics are often either dull or hilariously broken. On the plus side, ladder climbing is improved. Automatic pull-ups over ledges are nice too, and the robot control augmentation is splendid to use.


For what it's worth, it's possible to have both cloaking AND thermal masking, albeit at the cost of hacking abilities. Even if I liked being able to simply waltz past enemies and always have the initative, I think there was a reason that both of those augs were mutually excusive in the original DX.

It's pretty weird and 'convenient' that clubs and mosques and other such places have "codes" that can disable ALL your weapons, even the blunt clubs. It's a rather clumsy implementation of plot-mandated invincibility - you can kill anyone anywhere in this game, so the devs turned off weapons in certain public places to keep players from destroying the plot.

Graphics are plasticine and blockier than the original, and the original was on the blocky side already. I'd say IW's looks have actually aged more. Not good for the game's verisimillitude.

By far the worst part however is the fact that the game literally shuts down and relaunches itself every time you load a new level, supposedly to cut down on long-term runtime errors in the engine. It breaks the game's Steamworks functionality and it's just dumb as hell considering how small the levels are to begin with & how long the loading times are. I found myself deciding what to do based partially on the number of loading screens between me and my potential destinations.


Invisible War has less bombast than the original Deus Ex. While I guess it's a nice change of pace, I can't help but feel that's a liability for a game that also focus on globetrotting power conspiracies.

The voice acting is pretty damn bland. I like Alex's voice, though - that character's actors seem to have found a comfortable spot to let the character grow his (or her) own snarky, deadpan personality; distinct from yet similar to JC Denton's. Being able to pick a male or female character is also nice, since they at least went through the trouble of doubling the PC's VO work. The dynamic music that changes by location in the same level is a good touch; it's not as distinct or awesome as DX's, but good nonetheless.


SPOILERS AHEAD for this game as well as the original. If you want further analysis, you could try watching this Errant Signal video.

I do like how the factions this time around seem to be the most morally ambiguous of any in the series. The actual writing might not be very good - the amount of typos and inaccurate subtitles are also surprising for a game supposedly this prominent - but it's not a complete wreck. The subjects it deals with are still rather unique in the world of games.

By the mid-game, however, the writers start trotting out characters, plot points and eventually locations from the original presumably for the purpose of keeping players going. And at no point are you given any choices or quandaries to rival the original game. JC is essentially retconned into the Helios-merged being from one of the three endings in the original, which might not go over well for those who were really invested in making him their own charater in that game.

Oh yeah, all three original Deus Ex endings are canon here. It feels like a cop-out.

I also kind of like the fact that there are four different endings - especially since these include a 'renegade' option where you kill everyone, which you couldn't do in the original. Of course, these ending's aren't really on par with DX's, considering that the outcomes of each ending aren't quite what you'd expect . The renegade ending has the Omar inheriting the planet after baseline humanity blows itself to pieces in revanchist warfare...despite the very idea of nation-states supposedly being weaker than ever.

It's at least fitting that the factions are merely using you as a pawn in their grand plans. The neo-Helios ending I went for was kind of interesting...if only because it's apparently the least bad ending, and even that one entailed forced evolution and sacifice for all of humanity. Not exactly a good sign.

The worst part here, however, is how anti-climactic the end really is. For three out of four endings, you make your way to a poorly-rendered recreation of an iconic area from the first game and literally use a computer to select which ending you want. Compare to Deus Ex's sprawling end-game compound, where each ending entailed committing to multiple different objectives. That's not to mention how poorly the real nature of the various factions is handled, especially the early-game ones. It's not the worst sort of black-and-white writing, but it's still pretty shoddy!

Lastly, I don't like NG Resonance's music, but her subplot has some of the most interesting writing in the game. All I'll say is that IW predates the Snowden leaks by a decade.
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14 of 16 people (88%) found this review helpful
9.3 hrs on record
Posted: March 25
A difficult game to get running on Windows 7 at times, but a worthy sequel to one of the greatest First Person RPG's of all time.

Full video review:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WPvcAUFJ2Zw
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11 of 15 people (73%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
33.5 hrs on record
Posted: April 3
This game took me far too long to complete; mainly because I was constantly backtracking and getting lost not knowing where I was supposed to go and what I supposed to do. Perhaps I am spoiled by more modern games that have maps with objectives and compasses with directional markers and waypoints.

Initially I found Invisible War to be quite interesting but it soon descended into annoying monotony. Others have mentioned the loading screens - they are truly immersion breaking and very irritating.

Nothing about this game comes close to the original Deus Ex. The story is no where near as compelling, the environments are bland and repetitive and towards the end I just wanted it over with and I really didn't care which ending I played out.

I only really played it because I wanted to play through all the games in the franchise in order, but I wish I'd just skipped it.
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