Sid Meier’s Civilization: Beyond Earth is a new science-fiction-themed entry into the award winning Civilization series. As part of an expedition sent to find a home beyond Earth, lead your people into a new frontier, explore and colonize an alien planet and create a new civilization in space.
User reviews: Mixed (11,518 reviews)
Release Date: Oct 23, 2014

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Includes 2 items: Sid Meier's Civilization®: Beyond Earth™, Sid Meier's Starships

 

Recommended By Curators

"Although its foundation in Civ 5 makes it familiar, Beyond Earth is full of interesting surprises that are pleasantly difficult to master."
Read the full review here.

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May 18

Civilization: Beyond Earth expansion Rising Tide announced for Fall 2015

2K Announces Sid Meier’s Civilization®: Beyond Earth™ – Rising Tide Expansion Pack

Extensive addition for sci-fi entry to award-winning Civilization franchise introduces aquatic gameplay, an overhauled diplomacy system, hybrid Affinities and more!

Join the conversation on Twitter using the hashtag #RisingTide


New York, NY – May 18, 2015 – 2K and Firaxis Games today announced Sid Meier’s Civilization®: Beyond Earth™ – Rising Tide, the expansion pack for 2014’s turn-based strategy title, Civilization: Beyond Earth, is currently in development for Windows-based PC. Created by Firaxis Games, Rising Tide will enhance the Beyond Earth experience by adding a variety of new gameplay capabilities and providing near limitless ways for players to create a new future for humanity on an alien planet. The expansion pack is currently scheduled for release in fall 2015.

Rising Tide will expand Beyond Earth to new frontiers on the planet’s surface and across its seas, adding more choices and diplomatic options as players build “one more turn” toward a new vision for humanity’s future. New aquatic gameplay will explore the oceans for colonization by dramatically extending the play space, while an overhauled diplomacy system will provide players with additional layers of dynamic choices and options to shape the diplomatic landscape while engaging with the AI and one another.

“Firaxis Games has an impressive track record of delivering robust and innovative expansions that radically change player experience while adding extensive replay value,” said Sarah Anderson, SVP of Marketing at 2K. “Rising Tide is no exception, offering new features and overhauled gameplay systems that will challenge players embarking on a quest for planetary domination.”

“Rising Tide builds upon the lore of Beyond Earth, breaking away the historical boundaries of the original franchise and furthering mankind’s search for a new home in outer space,” said Sid Meier, director of creative development at Firaxis Games. “Whether colonizing the planet’s oceans, acquiring new Affinities or meeting exotic new leaders, aliens and units for the first time, Rising Tide offers more ways for players to write their own stories on a new world.”

Key features of Rising Tide include:

• Building floating settlements and accessing natural resources hidden beneath the seas of the alien planet, while alien beasts with unique abilities inhabit the water and challenge players in distinctive ways;
• Shaping the diplomatic landscape by upgrading traits, changing diplomatic relationships, and leveraging the benefits of your allies, all with political capital;
• Unlocking a dynamic set of Diplomatic Traits while activating different combinations in response to the changing world;
• Playing as one of four new factions, including the Al Falah, a group of nomad explorers descended from wealthy and resilient Middle Eastern states;
• Investing in multiple Affinities to unlock hybrid Affinity units and upgrades for the first time;
• Collecting and combining alien relics via a new Artifact System that unlocks powerful benefits;
• Exploring one of two new biomes, Primordial world, an untamed biome rife with volcanic activity and indicative of a chaotic landscape still forming in the new world.

Sid Meier’s Civilization: Beyond Earth – Rising Tide is not yet rated by the ESRB and will be available for Windows PC in fall 2015 for $29.99. For more information on Rising Tide, please visit http://www.civilization.com, become a fan on Facebook, follow Civilization on Twitter and subscribe to Civilization on YouTube.

Firaxis Games is a 2K studio. 2K is a publishing label of Take-Two Interactive Software, Inc. (NASDAQ: TTWO).

All trademarks and copyrights contained herein are the property of their respective holders.

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March 30

Winter 2015 Update hotfix now available

The release of the Winter 2015 Update brought a number of changes to Wonders and their effects. This hotfix is intended to correct some bugs which players have experienced.
- Quantum Computer and Promethean now function correctly.
- Ectogenesis Pods now give the correct Food per population.
- New Terran Myth now correctly applies culture to trade routes between different factions.

This is available for the PC version now, with the Mac version to follow in a few days.

36 comments Read more

Reviews

“A must play for strategy fans”
9 out of 10 – GAME INFORMER

“Successfully injects new life into Sid Meier's long-running strategy series”
9 out of 10 – POLYGON

“Stellar”
9 out of 10 – DESTRUCTOID

About This Game

Sid Meier's Civilization: Beyond Earth is a new science-fiction-themed entry into the award-winning Civilization series. Set in the future, global events have destabilized the world leading to a collapse of modern society, a new world order and an uncertain future for humanity. As the human race struggles to recover, the re-developed nations focus their resources on deep space travel to chart a new beginning for mankind.

As part of an expedition sent to find a home beyond Earth, you will write the next chapter for humanity as you lead your people into a new frontier and create a new civilization in space. Explore and colonize an alien planet, research new technologies, amass mighty armies, build incredible Wonders and shape the face of your new world. As you embark on your journey you must make critical decisions. From your choice of sponsor and the make-up of your colony, to the ultimate path you choose for your civilization, every decision opens up new possibilities.

Features

  • Seed the Adventure: Establish your cultural identity by choosing one of eight different expedition sponsors, each with its own leader and unique gameplay benefits. Assemble your spacecraft, cargo & colonists through a series of choices that directly seed the starting conditions when arriving at the new planet.
  • Colonize an Alien World: Explore the dangers and benefits of a new planet filled with dangerous terrain, mystical resources, and hostile life forms unlike those of Earth. Build outposts, unearth ancient alien relics, tame new forms of life, develop flourishing cities and establish trade routes to create prosperity for your people.
  • Technology Web: To reflect progress forward into an uncertain future, technology advancement occurs through a series of nonlinear choices that affect the development of mankind. The technology web is organized around three broad themes, each with a distinct victory condition.
  • Orbital Layer: Build and deploy advanced military, economic and scientific satellites that provide strategic offensive, defensive and support capabilities from orbit.
  • Unit Customization: Unlock different upgrades through the tech web and customize your units to reflect your play style.
  • Multiplayer: Up to 8 players can compete for dominance of a new alien world.
  • Mod support: Robust mod support allows you to customize and extend your game experience.

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
SteamOS + Linux
    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows® Vista SP2/ Windows® 7
    • Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo 1.8 GHz or AMD Athlon X2 64 2.0 GHz
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: 256 MB ATI HD3650 or better, 256 MB nVidia 8800 GT or better, or Intel HD 3000 or better integrated graphics
    • DirectX: Version 11
    • Hard Drive: 8 GB available space
    • Sound Card: DirectX 9.0c‐compatible sound card
    • Additional Notes: Other Requirements: Initial installation requires one-time Internet connection for Steam authentication; software installations required (included with the game) include Steam Client, Microsoft Visual C++2012 Runtime Libraries and Microsoft DirectX.
    Recommended:
    • OS: Windows® Vista SP2 / Windows® 7
    • Processor: 1.8 GHz Quad Core CPU
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: AMD HD5000 series or better (or ATI R9 series for Mantle support), nVidia GT400 series or better, or Intel IvyBridge or better integrated graphics
    • DirectX: Version 11
    • Hard Drive: 8 GB available space
    • Sound Card: DirectX 9.0c‐compatible sound card
    • Additional Notes: DirectX: DirectX version 11, or Mantle (with supported video card)
    Minimum:
    • OS: 10.9.5 (Mavericks), 10.10 (Yosemite)
    • Processor: Intel Core i3 (2.2 ghz)
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: ATI Radeon 4850 / nVidia 640M /Intel HD 4000
    • Hard Drive: 8 GB available space
    • Additional Notes: NOTICE: It is possible for Mac and PC to become out of sync during updates or patches. Within this short time period, Mac users will only be able to play other Mac users. NOTICE: The following video chipsets are unsupported for Civilization: Beyond Earth (Mac) • ATI Radeon X1000 series, HD 2400, 2600, 3870, 4670, 6490, 6630 • NVIDIA GeForce 7000 series, 8600, 8800, 9400, 9600, 320, 330, GT 120 • Intel GMA series, HD 3000
    Minimum:
    • OS: SteamOS, Ubuntu 14.04
    • Processor: Intel Core i3, AMD A10
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce 260
    • Hard Drive: 8 GB available space
    • Additional Notes: Don't meet the above requirements? That doesn't mean your configuration wont run Civilization: Beyond Earth. Visit the Beyond Earth community page to share your experience with other Linux players and learn about how to send bugs to Aspyr. Your feedback will help us improve Civilization: Beyond Earth Linux and future AAA Linux releases!
Helpful customer reviews
191 of 216 people (88%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
126.8 hrs on record
Posted: March 19
Alright, here is the lowdown.

I had been anticipating this game since it had been announced. I also had played a bit of alpha centauri, so I was interested to see where this game would go.

The Good:
- Some of the issues with 1UPT have been solved. I am still not a fan, but floating units helps you siege cities easier, which as somebody who has 500+ hours in civ (playing emperor/immortal) I appreciate this greatly. This effect comes in more late game.
- Cities don't get built instantly, which is great. I think we can all agree that it is annoying when you are 1 tile away from a settler who makes a city right before you get to him, and now suddenly, you have to come back with an army. Instead, they have an outpost, which is far easier to assault. This prevents the computer and other players from making low-risk, high reward cities all the time. They have to actually consider where they are building this outpost and defending it.
- The Tech web is very unique, and doesn't really force you into one direction. (although skipping out on spy tech at the beginning is truly shooting yourself in the foot)
- This game has FAR MORE depth than civ V did at release, and still more depth than CiV V after Gods and kings.
- Aliens are interesting in that they can be passive, or aggressive depending on how you deal with them. (This could use some more fine tuning. (Simply having Green, Light Green, Orange, and Red as aggression markers is not enough, give us more tiers, we need to be informed of exactly how much they feel aggressive to be able to act accordingly)
-Tier bonuses within the Virtue tree allow you to go accross the tree as oppose to just choosing one, and being forced to stick with it.
- The spy system is far more relevant than in Civ V, and cannot be ignored completely. This could be improved further though. (They could give you more choices of what to do)
- The three different ideologies are awesome, they all go in their own path and have their own playstyle. Unfortunately, in Multiplayer I inherit the Ideologies of my allies, which makes no sense to me. I think there should be an option to turn this off at least.
- Runs almost as well as Civ V.
- The technology announcer is a woman, unfortunately this means Civ Guy's voice is gone. So you don't get to hear him tell you "You have discovered COMPASS" Kinda sad, hehe, but I love the woman's voice even better.

The Bad
-Totally uninspired maps. It seems like the concern here was that players wouldn't be able to understand that a land is fertile unless it is a green grass land. Come on Firaxis, I think we are smarter than that, or else I don't think Civ would appeal to us.
- The landscape is completely like a re-colored Civ V, and is far too afraid to venture into sci-fi at all. It tries to hard to provide us with an easy way to understand the game from the first time we pick it up, and make us feel at home. Unfortunately this causes the land to look incredibly bland, and the color pallet is horrid, it is green, purple, and brown.
- Both of these issues come from the conservative approach that they seem to have take for this game, Make it easy, simple to understand. They were afraid to take risks, FAR too afraid. Look at alpha centauri, they were bold when they made that game, that game had personality; which leads me to my next point.

- I play this game, and I don't really see any type of personality to it. It is a blank slate, just a video game on a screen, no story, no basic theme. They tried to give you the idea that you lead your own future, but instead it just feels like they didn't give the game any spirit. (Maybe adding more themes for each ideology, and unique buildings would give you more of a feeling that your nation has become unique. ( A good example of this is Civ V, when you played civ you feel like nations strive for glory, and we look at the accomplishments of civilizations. In Civ BE it feels like you like land on a planet, and they tell you. OK, go tell your story. (that's it...)

- Teching up in the beginning is VERY SLOW. It pick ups rather fast once you get to the mid late game. But at the beginning, MY GOD, it is slow. I usually play standard on CIV V, but this feels 3 to 4 times as slow when it comes to teching. Maybe the way the game was designed required this, I myself am not sure if I buy this.

- The 1 UPT, although somewhat improved, is still an issue. This issue could be solved if they allowed siege units to fire above hills/forests. I guess they forget how to do that on the way over to Alpha Centauri... Seriously, I understand the distinction between Realism, and gameplay. But let my damn artillery fire 3 tiles away, even if it is for reduced damage. This will open up options for people, maybe let you have elongated sieges. Whether this is for gameplay purposes, or realism purposes, i don't get why artillery fire only 2 hexes away in the beginning.

-Religion is gone. I for one understand why this isn't in the game YET. But it needs to make a re-appearance, this was an aspect of the game that gave Civ V depth. This may have been cut because of the 1/3 rule they have at firaxis. From game to game,they removed 1/3rd of the freatures, and replace 1/3rd. They are so afraid to overburden us with features, but guess what Firaxis? If you want us to stay fans of your game, you have to add a bit of depth(as our mastery increases), or else your fans get tired of your games.

- The map packs aren't distinct, i can't really even remember which one looks like when looking at the map list. I know they have to consider balance when making maps, but these maps have very little to nothing unique about them. At least change up the color pallet, make us feel like we are on a different planet. I just feel like we are on a different version of the same planet every single time I play.
- The wonders make no sense, and aren't even drawn out. It's like they expect you to fill in the colors with your mind. Just have one of your awesome artists draw up something futuristic and awesome. We don't need to fill in every single part of the game with our imagination, give us a base idea or image to work with. Not the quickly drawn up blueprint of a wonder that wasn't even explained properly.
- There is very little Alien diversity. I think there are about 4 aliens, and they are the same 4 in every single map. (2 water aliens for a total of 6) Still, it isn't enough, they should vary, they should be part of the equation when you start the game.
The suggestions

- Give us an intro for each victory, that would be awesome, and help build the "story" that Firaxis wants to help build in our minds.
-Give us more uniqueness for each Ideology.
- Provide us with more ideologies in the long run.
- Bring back religion, and add some depth to it if possible. (Find a way to make it work.)
-Please...Please, please... re-work the maps, they look terribly boring, the color pallet is horrid, and they are the opposite of inspiring.
-Bring some scifi into this, give us farmable deserts, habitable mountains, ocean cities, floating cities. Give us something original, ANYTHING. Make us dream of the future. I believe Firaxis can achieve this while keeping the game balanced.
- Bring randomized aliens into the game. Have a type of alien species that spawn randomly at the beginning of the game. Depending on what it is, you can adjust your strategy.
- Extend the benefits and possibilities that you have when you go beyond level 13 of an affinity. Let it change our civilization even more, and maybe give more benefits.

All in all, the game is good, pretty good, but not great. It needs something more, and it needs to be daring.
The hours speak for themselves : Civ V (500 hours) Civ BE 54 hours

I recommend this game based on the fact that this game is good enough, and I believe firaxis can fix most of their faults. I doubt they will fix everything though, only time will tell.
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68 of 83 people (82%) found this review helpful
24.5 hrs on record
Posted: June 11
This is my first review of a game so please bare with me as I get through this:

Lets start with what I think this game did well:

1- The game was very inticing, especially for some one who missed Sid Meier's Alpha Centauri.
i- they did well advertising it and giving you a demo to try it out
2- The graphics are very pleasing and the gameplay is very interesting, the first 100 turns or so
3- The alien race is very different and interesting, the first 100 turns or so
4- The setup up of the technololgy tree is nice change, though there is till some major improvements to be had
5- The affenity point system is a nice feature and adds a different dynamic, not found in civ 5

Now lets get to the reason I would not recomend this game:

1- The gameplay has not changed much from civ 5, even though there has been major complaints on the gamplay change from Civ 4 to Civ 5, I would have thought there would be some reaction there.
2- The aliens start out interesting and you are kinda of interested in what envolvement they will have, but as the game progresses they never really become anything more than an obstacles.
i- Imagen we have traveled to a different planet, this should be a perfect time to intice our explorative nature and then reward it. Aliens wandering around and getting in your way is not a rewarding feeling
3- Happiness- whats the point, has no real affect other than to reduce speed in technology advances, which still doesnt slow it down that much.
i- add more positives to happiness, as well as negatives. i.e revolts and choosing to join another faction.
4- Technology- 5 basic units doesnt cut it, by the time you get anything good, the games over. As well would it hurt to add a little more varity?
5- Exploration- There is nothing intriguing here, you find a few pods and get a bonus, usually very small.
i- we are exploring a new world!!! There should be new things we never new about, anything will do. Discover a technology not available normally. Discover food we've never seen, discover alian civilization. The list goes on and most importantly make a story about it, so we understand and appreciate the importance
6- Lastly, this part is a complaint about the price i paid and what i got out of it. I paid around 50 dollars to get a game that was more like an expansion to civ5, in my opinion. Then after buying the game, I realized I had to spend more just to get the things i expected to get when i first bought the game, i.e. maps, added variety to units and exploration.
i- to top it all off the game was discounted 50 percent two days later! I have been a devouted civ fan since i was 12 years old, im quite a bit older now, this game has made me really reconsider that devotion.

I hope that this review serves anyone who reads this well, happy gaming!
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56 of 77 people (73%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
13.3 hrs on record
Posted: June 13
Solid foundation with some questionable additions // Recommended for fans of the series

+ The 'one more turn' mentality is still present in full force
+ Indigenous wildlife boasts much more of a challenge, of a variety, and of a better collective design than barbarians of the previous installments
+ Combat against cities and units is as well-implemented and satisfying as ever; the audio design and smooth animations make for a very fulfilling experience
+ Upgrades are free of resources requirements and are universally applied amongst all units of that type; does well to eliminate the need to hunt down and manage obsolete units
+ Research tree is vastly improved; it can be daunting at first, but the superiority of this system comes through on subsequent playthroughs (once the player is more familiar with the 'branches and leaves' and what they unlock)
+ The three possible affinities are a welcome addition and do much to offer great variety and customization in the mid- to late-game
+ 'Favors' are a very welcome concept, and work perfectly to improve productivity of player-AI interactions and general diplomacy
+ Sleek, aesthetically pleasing, and functional UI
+ Effortless and rewarding to experiment with mods through the Steam workshop
+ Satellites are a welcome addition, adding another layer of possible resource buffs to the game without cluttering the map
+ Stunning environment designs; flora and resources really stand out in beautiful and creative ways
+ Espionage and trade work in largely the same ways as in Civ V, with some minor improvements

- Culture is now an empty and lifeless statistic in the absence of art, musicians, etc.
- Confusing loss of custom game modifiers as compared to the previous installment of the series
- Steep learning curve, mostly due to alien and unfamiliar terrain features
- Finishing a game is underwhelming, and does little to reward the player, especially compared to previous installments
- Health, as a resource, seems to be a slightly poorer implementation than the happiness of Civ V, and feels unreasonably difficult to manage effectively
- There are no more natural wonders to be found, taking a bit of fun and reward out of exploration
- Quests are boring and repetitive; they do little to add to the game's dimensions
- The available factions feel somewhat bland and uninteresting
- There are no faction-specific units; the only difference between factions lies in the starting bonuses
- AI have almost no aggression factor whatsoever, even into upper middling levels of difficulty

If you enjoyed this review, please follow my curator page. Also, feel free to join my group, LockeProposal's Big Day Out for discussion and announcements. Thanks for reading!
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27 of 33 people (82%) found this review helpful
181.7 hrs on record
Posted: May 11
I have been a die-hard fan of the Civ franchise since I played the original Civilizations on my 8086 back in 91. I have purchased every Civ game/expansion since including Call To Power, Alpha Centauri and Revolution. It is with great dissapointment that I recommend NOT playing Beyond Earth.

I have read several of the reviews on Steam and agree with most of the issues others have with the game so I won't reiterate. My biggest beef with Beyond Earth is its lack of replayability. I expect a Civ game to capture me and make me want to always "play just one more turn." With Beyond Earth, the first play through was OK, but every time I start a new game I lose interest by turn 100. No matter what faction or abilities I choose or affinity and victory conditions I pursue, every game feels exactly the same.

I come back to the game every few weeks to try to learn to enjoy the game (I would like to get my $60 worth of play time out of it) but am unable to stay hooked. I certainly hope the next Civ title will make up for this disaster.
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22 of 28 people (79%) found this review helpful
30.5 hrs on record
Posted: June 11
If this game wasn't branded with the Civilization title, I think people would like this game.

Sid Meier's Civilization: Beyond Earth is a game seemingly intended for veterans of the 4x strategy genre and not Civ fans. I believe this ultimately hurt the game, but it does not detract from the gameplay if you are prepared for it. The game does not relate to Civ 5 in many ways and has many different mechanics in terms of how to allocate your time and resources.

When I first began playing this game, as a sort of newbie to the series starting from Civ 5, I did not find this game very engaging and I felt like the game was lacking in a lot of ways that made Civ 5 such an outstanding title (if you include dlc). It was not until I had played and understood a more complicated 4x strategy that I began to play more about this game. Now that I do understand more about this game, I'll attempt to explain some of the more basic elements.

Mechanics

Affinities:
Affinities are basically the freedom/order/autocracy of this game, just much, much more important. Affinities are what define your civilization. There are three kinds: Harmony, Supremacy, and Purity. Affinities affect how other civilzations react to you and what sort of victories you can achieve. Delving deep into an affinity is necessary to win certain victories and is beneficial towards your military, as units grow in power as your affinity strengthens. The more you develop into an affinity, the more your civ becomes like that affinity. Your actions quickly become louder than your words as you and the other civilizations advance into their affinities and you will find friends and foes alike based on nothing but your ideology.

Science:
Probably the most important thing in the entire game next to affinities. The science web (yes that's web, not tree) comes in two parts: branches and leaves. Branches are the basic parts to a technology that allow you move further into the web by researching them. Leaves allow you to speciallize in a tree. Unlike branches, you can't progress further into the web by reasearching leaves. Leaves, however, often offer better benefits than the more generalized branches do. Unlike Civ 5 where the science tree is linear and you must keep up research in order to progress as a civilization, you can pick and chose exactly what technology will help you the best for what you are trying to do. As a new player to this game and games like this, that's a lot of choices to pick from and it can get confusing at times. It's important to understand what victories there are, what victory you want to pursue, and decide on researching technologies based on what victory you want.

Virtues:
Like previous Civ games, culture is also an important aspect of the game. Culture allows you to obtain virtues which provide boosts to your civilization. There are 4 virtue trees: might, prosperity, knowledge and industry. Delving deep into a tree will boost combat, food, production, energy (money), science, culture or health based on which trees you chose. Once again, this game provides with the choice of what virtues you want to pick, and how you want to allocate them. If you chose to speciallize in a tree, you will get unique benefits the more you put into that tree. If you chose to go into multiple trees, you get unique benefits generalizing into the same level in each tree.

Spying:
Spies provide nice, one-time bonuses you your civilization ever so-often. Spies can establish spy networks, siphon money, steal science or even call giant siege worms to wreak havoc on another civilization's city. Spies, although not vital, are very helpful to your civlization's goals.

Aliens:
You can make aliens friend or foe - it's entirely your choice. The harmony affinity allows you to be at peace with the alien life on the planet and even use them against your foes. Supremacy and Purity, however, could care less about the aliens. If you don't wish to make the aliens friends, they quickly become nuissances that must be dealt with from time to time. Keep in mind, though, that attacking the local wildlife can put you at odds with other civilizations bent on protecting and preserving the alien life.

Miasma:
Some of the most annoying stuff in the game. Miasma covers certain land tiles on the map and it slowly deals damage to units that end their turn on it. You can get rid of the miasma by researching the right technologies and using workers or satellites, or use the miasma to your advantage by delving into the harmony affinity allowing them to instead heal your units for the same amount every time a unit ends their turn on it.

I found this game fun only after I had played and understood other 4x strategy games. All-in-all, it's a solid game that I can assume will only get better with DLC (the base Civ 5 game really sucked and needed all of the DLC for it). I hope this was helpful in people deciding whether or not to get this game and for those disappointed fans of the Civ 5 series, maybe this genre just isn't for you.
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