'In the hallways of the ancients, the Keepers have existed forever.' The legend also claims that whoever unites these rings with the artifacts of the parallel worlds will achieve great power and immortality.
User reviews: Mixed (64 reviews)
Release Date: Jun 24, 2004
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About This Game

'In the hallways of the ancients, the Keepers have existed forever.'

The legend also claims that whoever unites these rings with the artifacts of the parallel worlds will achieve great power and immortality.

In unique worlds of dreams and reality, magical, mechanical and ethereal lands, take on the quest to find the artifacts cleverly concealed throughout the lands. Four parallel worlds await you on your journey: The Ademika Valley, The Mechanical World, The Isoteric World, and lastly, the Island of Unity, each with different environments to explore, challenges to encounter and a variety of indigenous puzzles to solve.

Lose yourself in this fantastic and rich adventure, uncover the smallest details, collect information, solve the enigmas and unravel the saga of intrigue, exploration and treachery that is AURA: Fate of the Ages.


Key features:

  • First-person puzzle exploration game
  • An original fantasy-based mass appeal, unique and original storyline.
  • Mouse driven, with an intuitive point-and-click interface
  • Unbelievably realistic and beautiful pre-rendered graphics and environments
  • Original orchestral musical score and immersive ambient soundtrack
  • Inventive and original puzzles

System Requirements

    Minimum:

    • OS: Windows® 98SE/ME/2000/XP
    • Processor: 800 MHz Pentium® III
    • Memory: 64 MB RAM (128 MB Recommended)
    • Graphics: 32 MB DirectX 8/9 Compatible 3D Video Card (or Higher)
    • DirectX®: DirectX 8.1
    • Hard Drive: 1.3 GB Hard Disk Space ( 2.4GB Recommended)
    • Sound: 32 MB DirectX 8/9 Compatible 3D Video Card (or Higher)
Helpful customer reviews
3 of 4 people (75%) found this review helpful
10.8 hrs on record
Aura: The Fate of Ages is a puzzle adventure in a 3D environment. Basically, you jump from one room to another finding clues or items to complete puzzles of different challenge with the rooms being pre-rendered, quite beautiful backgrounds to your current point of view which you can turn 360 degrees sideways and almost as much up and down.

It took me some time to get into the mindset for the puzzles herein but once you found that the main obstacle is the own failure to find interactive pieces/ways in the rooms currently available.
One such piece was an admittedly quite big leaf that I had to collect from a forest ground and couldn't for more than an hour. Another was a lever basically standing vertically with the player's point of view almost directly above it.

Still the game is fun. I like that puzzles tended to discourage brute-forcing (with often more than a thousand combinations possible) and that, with the exception of two of them, I could think them through before solving them.

Even though the graphics seem a bit dated I recommend the game for providing a few hours of challenging puzzles.
Posted: July 13
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4 of 7 people (57%) found this review helpful
11.4 hrs on record
Bought this game to play with my girlfriend. We both thoroghly enjoyed it, some of the puzzles had us both thinking of soloutions for what seemed like hours but it was an entirely enjoyable experience. Only wish it was a bit longer (Expansion maybe? wink wink nudge nudge). Great Puzzle game.
Posted: July 10
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1 of 2 people (50%) found this review helpful
5.3 hrs on record
Not gonna lie Aura tries to be more like myst.But it fails with its puzzles and characters.Storyline seems fine.But overall i prefer myst over these series.But that doesnt mean this is a bad game.Sure it was fun to solve puzzles but they have been so easy after playing myst.
Posted: August 4
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1 of 2 people (50%) found this review helpful
3.3 hrs on record
Love it Puzzles are semi hard but once u figure it out its like wow im a idiot how did i not get that the first time ^^
Posted: September 9
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1 of 3 people (33%) found this review helpful
20.9 hrs on record
It started well with lots of smart puzzles although the storyline was weak.
The second half of this game is terrible and i found it hard to bother completing the puzzles.
The writers of the game seemed to lose interest too. It was fairly short (completed in 20 hrs)
If you can get it cheap its worth buying.
Posted: July 10
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32 of 41 people (78%) found this review helpful
6.8 hrs on record
It's hard not to compare this to entries in the Myst series, specifically Myst III: Exile and Myst IV: Revelation. This is mostly due to the fact that numerous elements were borrowed from each of those games and made just different enough not to seem as though Streko Graphics had done little more than create a Myst clone.

While this is a perfectly serviceable adventure game, it's not without flaws (some major, some minor depending on how particular the player is).

(A technical aside - some bugs do exist within the game and may likely go unpatched given the age of the title, including a crash to desktop when attempting to delete a save through the in-game menu)

The age of the title means that it hasn't held up well over the years, so all the modern visual comforts and relevant settings that accompany them are absent. No true widescreen support and no option to run windowed being two prime examples. The extent of the video settings go as far as color depth options and a few standard definition resolution choices.

Going hand in hand with that, most of the 3D modeling in the game is standard fare for the time this title was originally released. Some of the characters look absolutely ridiculous at times and move in a rather wooden manner. Something that certainly allows one to appreciate the advances in that technology at present.

As to the plot, what's there is a fraction of a whole. This isn't made clear here on the store page but this is the first part of a series which means the story ends on something of a cliffhanger.

What story that is present isn't all that compelling and lacks depth, especially when it comes to the characters it introduces.

Unfortunately most of the voice acting in the game is substandard, delivered in monotone with no real inflection toward emotion (perhaps best exemplified by the blacksmith character who does nothing but shout in his brief interaction sequence yet still manages not to sound angry while doing it).

Gameplay is typical of the adventure game type - click to navigate a pre-rendered landscape and interact with points of interest. A majority of the puzzles are simple and can be solved without use of a hint system or walkthrough. Only one puzzle in the entire game is randomized, frustratingly to the point where it becomes less a traditional puzzle and more a mini-game of chance as to how many tries it takes before the correct sequence is found.

Don't be fooled entirely by the simplicity though as there are a small number of puzzles that present a challenge in how they can be solved.

The music and sound design are a mixed blessing somewhat. Most of the game's soundtrack consists of pieces of music that have utterly random ambient noises and sound effects dropped within the middle of their loops. This leads to awkward moments at certain points in the game where something like a door knock can be misinterpreted as a cue that a door nearby needs opened.

Likewise there are questionable moments of music used that betray the atmosphere of the game at certain times. Several dramatic stings are completely out of place in the likes of a small mirrored chamber or a well lit, spacious room.

The pre-rendered environments in the game are quite possibly the best done aspect of it. Seeing flecked paint on aging wood or an expanse of snow covered land watched over by a cadre of planets is nothing short of wonderful.

Taking Aura: Fate of the Ages for what it is, would I recommend it? In general, no. While it is not entirely horrible, there are better examples of the adventure game to play (be it Myst or otherwise) that accomplish exactly what this game does (if not more).

However, if you've exhausted the number of adventure games (scarce as they come these days) available to play then Aura: Fate of the Ages is (possibly) worth a few hours of your time. It likely won't climb to the top of your "best of" list but it's definitely not a total failure of the genre either.
Posted: December 14, 2013
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