A collaboration between 2 Player Productions and Double Fine Productions, the "Double Fine Adventure" series chronicles the creation of “Broken Age,” a three-year journey spanning twenty episodes, and the most in-depth look at video game development ever created.
User reviews:
Overall:
Positive (12 reviews) - 91% of the 12 user reviews for this video are positive.
Release Date: Oct 1, 2015

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Reviews

“Double Fine Adventure is the best video game documentary to date”
Eurogamer

“A must-watch for anyone interested in the art of game creation”
Game Informer

“Even if you don’t care a jot about adventure games, even if you’ve never picked up a Double Fine game in your life—this is a documentary that demands your eyeballs (and your heart).”
8-bit Chimp

Streaming Video

This content is only available in an online streaming format. More information about streaming videos can be found in the Streaming Videos on Steam FAQ.

About This Video

The collaboration between 2 Player Productions and Double Fine Productions that launched a historic Kickstarter campaign has reached its conclusion! A three-year journey spanning twenty episodes, the "Double Fine Adventure" series chronicles the creation of “Broken Age,” from a germ of an idea in Tim Schafer’s notebook to a finished game and beyond.

Along the way, the team is confronted with production delays, internal strife, and outside controversy in what is the most honest, in-depth look at video game development ever created. Previously exclusive to Double Fine’s Kickstarter backers, now everyone can share in the passion, humor, and heartbreak of this landmark documentary series.

This series is currently available on Steam through HD streaming. 2 Player Productions is currently working on finalizing the series with improved post production and adding features like commentary and subtitles. Existing files will be upgraded free of cost with the latest versions when they become available in Q4 2015.

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
SteamOS + Linux
    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows Vista
    • Processor: Intel Core 2 or AMD equivalent
    • Memory: 1 GB RAM
    • Network: Broadband Internet connection
    • Storage: 200 MB available space
    • Additional Notes: Network Bandwidth of 5Mbps for 540p, 3Mbps for 360p.
    Recommended:
    • OS: Windows 7, 8.1 or 10
    • Processor: Intel Core I3+ or AMD equivalent recommended for HD 1080p playback
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Network: Broadband Internet connection
    • Storage: 500 MB available space
    • Additional Notes: Network Bandwidth of 12Mbps for 1080p or 8Mbps for 720p.
    Minimum:
    • OS: Mac OSX 10.7
    • Processor: Intel Core 2 or AMD equivalent
    • Memory: 1 GB RAM
    • Network: Broadband Internet connection
    • Storage: 200 MB available space
    • Additional Notes: Network Bandwidth of 5Mbps for 540p, 3Mbps for 360p.
    Recommended:
    • OS: Mac OSX 10.10+
    • Processor: Intel Core I3+ or AMD equivalent recommended for HD 1080p playback
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Network: Broadband Internet connection
    • Storage: 500 MB available space
    • Additional Notes: Network Bandwidth of 12Mbps for 1080p or 8Mbps for 720p.
    Minimum:
    • OS: Linux Ubuntu 12.04 or later, SteamOS 2.20 or later
    • Processor: Intel Core 2 or AMD equivalent
    • Memory: 1 GB RAM
    • Network: Broadband Internet connection
    • Storage: 200 MB available space
    • Additional Notes: Network Bandwidth of 5Mbps for 540p, 3Mbps for 360p.
    Recommended:
    • OS: Linux Ubuntu 12.04 or later, SteamOS 2.20 or later
    • Processor: Intel Core I3+ or AMD equivalent recommended for HD 1080p playback
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Network: Broadband Internet connection
    • Storage: 500 MB available space
    • Additional Notes: Network Bandwidth of 12Mbps for 1080p or 8Mbps for 720p.
Customer reviews
Customer Review system updated! Learn more
Overall:
Positive (12 reviews)
Recently Posted
Kel-nage
( 4.1 hrs on record )
Posted: June 4
A fascinating insight into the inner workings of a game development studio. You really see the ups and downs that come with creating a game and you even start to emphasise with the protagonists (i.e. the developers and designers).

Well-worth watching!
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Face Hugger
( 0.3 hrs on record )
Posted: May 7
Well shot, visually impressive and interesting. It provides a good glimpse of how a game is created, from funding and budgeting, to concept building and art design, to the actual nuts and bolts development. It makes the business of making games look both rewarding and terrifying. Hours of quality documentary for $14.99 - a steal.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
MakoSipper
( 5.4 hrs on record )
Posted: December 9, 2015
Double Fine Adventure! is a 20-episode 12-hour documentary about the creation process of the game Broken Age. If you haven't played Broken Age, I wouldn't recommend watching any of the episodes, because the spoilers get more and more frequent and will eventually ruin the game for you.

Pros & Cons:

👍 There's a lot of content--roughly 12 hours.
👍 It's very detailed, and seems to show the whole creation process with considerable transparency, and you'll learn stuff you otherwise probably wouldn't.
👍 It seems to be honest.
👍 Very, very touching and emotional (I got teary a few times), because it gets really personal, but not being overly like "take pity on them!".
👍 You end up getting attached to all the chara--I mean, all the staff involved in the game.
👍 I also just have to mention the great music I keep on catching myself whistling. Really lovely.

± It has a lot of spoilers for Broken Age, so beware.

👎 It has a lot of footage, but sometimes it feels like it drags a bit too long.

So it was really nice to watch. If you love Broken Age and/or are curious about the game developing process in an indie company (and for a crowdfunded game, too), I can't see why you shouldn't consider watching this.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
MORSOV
( 0.0 hrs on record )
Posted: October 21, 2015
Orwell was right: The Surveillance age is here. Although not quite in the way he predicted.

Double Fine has graciously allowed 2 Player Productions to invade their personal space for the duration of the development of Broken Age, and gamers should thank them greatly; because what we got in the end was not just a game, but also the greatest video game documentary of all time. 2 Player Productions, for the first time ever, have documented the entire game development process from start to finish in an unfiltered, candid look at the great highs and crushing lows that come with making a game.
I urge you, regardless of your views on Double Fine, to pick up the documentary.
If you have never worked in game development, your perspective will widen, and you will finally get to understand the process not just from a consumer perspective, but from the perspective of a hardworking, devoted team of passionate game makers.
I sincerely believe that this documentary will change your perspective on video games, it certainly has for me.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Kylo Ren is a Twilight Reject
( 1.2 hrs on record )
Posted: October 18, 2015
This is an amazingly good documentary about the making of a video game from beginning to the end. They don't hide anything, other than potential spoilers.

Well worth watching regardless of your interest in the game itself.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Elaine Marley
( 1.3 hrs on record )
Posted: October 7, 2015
A riveting and well-produced series that gives great insights from every area and at every stage of development, from conception to after shipping. The devotion to creativity and making the best work they can from every member of the team is inspiring. You get an honest portrayal of all the struggles and insecurities and difficult decisions of making video games, and it gets heartbreaking. Other moments are more joyous, and there's lots of humour, particularly from Tim Schafer, as you'd might expect from the writer of several of the wittiest games of all time.

The full series is also available on youtube (Double Fine Adventure! playlist on the Double Fine channel), but here you'll get to see it at higher quality, plus soon there will be the addition of extras like commentaries, the removal of spoiler blurs and colour-correction, so this is the cheapest option if you want those things. If you want DRM-free downloads as well as streaming and even more extras (the Sidequests videos are currently missing from the Steam version) you can also buy the series at the VHX Double Fine Adventure website.

The closest thing that exists to this is the book The Writer's Tale by Russell T Davies about the making of the television show Doctor Who.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
genoforprez
Posted: October 5, 2015
One of the best, if not THE best, documetaries on game development in existence. A lot of what game development entails is pretty boring to watch (insert person sitting at computer staring at lines of code for six straight hours here), but fortunately you don't have to endure that kind of boredom in this doc. It was filmed and edited by the brilliant team at 2 Player Productions (also famous for the Minecraft documentary and the first season of Penny Arcade The Series). They skim over all of the boring, monotonous parts of game dev and present something that is very viewer friendly. You get to see interviews with the individual team members, be a fly on the wall during team meetings, and watch each person on the team perform and describe their role. One of my favorite parts of the entire documentary is watching all of the game's concept artists have an art jam, admiring each other's work, swapping information on the utensils they are using, etc. Who doesn't love watching nerds feed off of each other's enthusiasm?

It pretty much also goes without saying that you'll get a lot of one-on-one with some legendary game industry figures including Peter Chan, Peter McConnel, Ron Gilbert, and (of course) Tim Schafer. You'll also get to see a variety of other famous faces along the way, including some behind the scenes with Jack Black, Elijiah Wood, and Jennifer Hale. Also some famous people who you never saw before until this documentary, such as Richard Horvitz (Raz in Psychonauts, Zim in Invader Zim, Dagget in Angry Beavers, etc)!

The documentary is truly a great game dev documentary because you really do get to see the good as well as the bad. On one hand, the company manages to develop and ship a successful game, so you get to see that. But you also get to see the company react to both the positive reactions and negative reactions to the game. There is also the interesting problem in the middle of development where a lot of rumors and misinformation about the project start going around and then mainstream gaming news sites start repeating it, which naturally creates a lot of distress. And even though this particular game ships as a successful project, another unannounced project gets cancelled at the very end of the doc, which results in a handful of layoffs. It is a very sad turn of events not only because layoffs are sad, but also because it is the first time the company has ever had to layoff any employees. And since you just spent the entire documentary getting to know each of the developers and even growing fond of particular ones, it is really hard to have to witness that Sophie's choice the company has to make at the end. It's interesting, if sad, to see what all of that looks like from the inside.

TLDR: Think MTV's The Real World, but with game development! And famous people!

FULL DISCLOSURE: I have been a fan of Double Fine since their first game and have been a member of their community for many years. I was a happy backer of the Double Fine Adventure kickstarter. I therefore had already watched the complete documentary before acquiring it on steam. I received my steam key as a prize in a Double Fine community contest.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Sarper
( 0.9 hrs on record )
Posted: October 4, 2015
A fun to watch insight into what it takes to make games. Documentary itself is amazing but I won't recommend this because;

1) It's freely available in the youtube officialy (Can't see many differences between the two except this one has 1080p, youtube is 720p)
2) It requires Steam streaming, so you can't watch it in mobile devices, you can't download it and watch it offline.
3) There are no subtitles or closed captions.
4) There is no commentary track.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
flesk
( 1.0 hrs on record )
Posted: October 2, 2015
An unprecedented look into the development of a video game, from initial design to releasing the complete product.

As a backer of the Kickstarter campaign (my first), I have already watched the entire documentary and enjoyed every minute of it. The documentary follows the team through design talks, art jams, voice recordings and much more. It also touches on the technical details of things like developing a cross-platform game and implementing a dialogue system, but never gets so technical as to be alienating to more casual viewers.

This is also an entertainment product, and one that delivers solid portions of humor and emotion. As a fan of Double Fine (hence my Psychonauts avatar), I couldn't help but get a little teary-eyed when the documentary dealt with the company layoffs that followed the cancellation of an unannounced project and the dedication that went into pushing the game through the final crunch.

Full disclosure: I got this copy of the documentary for review purposes, and this being my first experience streaming anything through the Steam client, I'm glad to note that it works well on my Linux system. I've been streaming in 1080p on 100 Mbps broadband, but for those strapped on cash or bandwidth, there are also other options to view this documentary: It's available for free on Double Fine's YouTube channel, though the quality is capped at 720p. You can also buy HD downloads from VHX with a bunch of extras if streaming is an issue.

If you're interested video game development and/or Double Fine, you should definitely watch this documentary.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Tangie
Posted: October 1, 2015
I orginally watched this on Youtube, but decided to puchase it to support Double Fine Productions, and it's probably one of the best video game documentaries out there, in my opinion.

I say this because it includes both the negatives and the positives of this aspect of the video game business. Sometimes, it even seems to focus more on the negatives in favor of being as realistic as possible. This documentary also includes many different perspectives from the various positions in Double Fine. I was rather surprised at their inclusion of something even like the sound designers and composers, which isn't often seen (at least not in the video game documentaries I've watched.)
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Most Helpful Reviews  In the past 30 days
2 of 2 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
4.1 hrs on record
Posted: June 4
A fascinating insight into the inner workings of a game development studio. You really see the ups and downs that come with creating a game and you even start to emphasise with the protagonists (i.e. the developers and designers).

Well-worth watching!
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
Most Helpful Reviews  Overall
125 of 140 people (89%) found this review helpful
4 people found this review funny
Not Recommended
0.9 hrs on record
Posted: October 4, 2015
A fun to watch insight into what it takes to make games. Documentary itself is amazing but I won't recommend this because;

1) It's freely available in the youtube officialy (Can't see many differences between the two except this one has 1080p, youtube is 720p)
2) It requires Steam streaming, so you can't watch it in mobile devices, you can't download it and watch it offline.
3) There are no subtitles or closed captions.
4) There is no commentary track.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
30 of 44 people (68%) found this review helpful
2 people found this review funny
Recommended
1.0 hrs on record
Posted: October 2, 2015
An unprecedented look into the development of a video game, from initial design to releasing the complete product.

As a backer of the Kickstarter campaign (my first), I have already watched the entire documentary and enjoyed every minute of it. The documentary follows the team through design talks, art jams, voice recordings and much more. It also touches on the technical details of things like developing a cross-platform game and implementing a dialogue system, but never gets so technical as to be alienating to more casual viewers.

This is also an entertainment product, and one that delivers solid portions of humor and emotion. As a fan of Double Fine (hence my Psychonauts avatar), I couldn't help but get a little teary-eyed when the documentary dealt with the company layoffs that followed the cancellation of an unannounced project and the dedication that went into pushing the game through the final crunch.

Full disclosure: I got this copy of the documentary for review purposes, and this being my first experience streaming anything through the Steam client, I'm glad to note that it works well on my Linux system. I've been streaming in 1080p on 100 Mbps broadband, but for those strapped on cash or bandwidth, there are also other options to view this documentary: It's available for free on Double Fine's YouTube channel, though the quality is capped at 720p. You can also buy HD downloads from VHX with a bunch of extras if streaming is an issue.

If you're interested video game development and/or Double Fine, you should definitely watch this documentary.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
40 of 62 people (65%) found this review helpful
2 people found this review funny
Recommended
Posted: October 1, 2015
A lengthy and candid look at the ups and downs of game development. I definitely recommend this to anyone that's thinking about becoming a game developer or is just curious about how games are made. The whole documentary is available for free on Youtube, but you can pick it on Steam if you want that high-def goodness.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
13 of 15 people (87%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
Recommended
5.4 hrs on record
Posted: December 9, 2015
Double Fine Adventure! is a 20-episode 12-hour documentary about the creation process of the game Broken Age. If you haven't played Broken Age, I wouldn't recommend watching any of the episodes, because the spoilers get more and more frequent and will eventually ruin the game for you.

Pros & Cons:

👍 There's a lot of content--roughly 12 hours.
👍 It's very detailed, and seems to show the whole creation process with considerable transparency, and you'll learn stuff you otherwise probably wouldn't.
👍 It seems to be honest.
👍 Very, very touching and emotional (I got teary a few times), because it gets really personal, but not being overly like "take pity on them!".
👍 You end up getting attached to all the chara--I mean, all the staff involved in the game.
👍 I also just have to mention the great music I keep on catching myself whistling. Really lovely.

± It has a lot of spoilers for Broken Age, so beware.

👎 It has a lot of footage, but sometimes it feels like it drags a bit too long.

So it was really nice to watch. If you love Broken Age and/or are curious about the game developing process in an indie company (and for a crowdfunded game, too), I can't see why you shouldn't consider watching this.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
24 of 39 people (62%) found this review helpful
Recommended
Posted: October 1, 2015
I orginally watched this on Youtube, but decided to puchase it to support Double Fine Productions, and it's probably one of the best video game documentaries out there, in my opinion.

I say this because it includes both the negatives and the positives of this aspect of the video game business. Sometimes, it even seems to focus more on the negatives in favor of being as realistic as possible. This documentary also includes many different perspectives from the various positions in Double Fine. I was rather surprised at their inclusion of something even like the sound designers and composers, which isn't often seen (at least not in the video game documentaries I've watched.)
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
4 of 5 people (80%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
Recommended
1.3 hrs on record
Posted: October 7, 2015
A riveting and well-produced series that gives great insights from every area and at every stage of development, from conception to after shipping. The devotion to creativity and making the best work they can from every member of the team is inspiring. You get an honest portrayal of all the struggles and insecurities and difficult decisions of making video games, and it gets heartbreaking. Other moments are more joyous, and there's lots of humour, particularly from Tim Schafer, as you'd might expect from the writer of several of the wittiest games of all time.

The full series is also available on youtube (Double Fine Adventure! playlist on the Double Fine channel), but here you'll get to see it at higher quality, plus soon there will be the addition of extras like commentaries, the removal of spoiler blurs and colour-correction, so this is the cheapest option if you want those things. If you want DRM-free downloads as well as streaming and even more extras (the Sidequests videos are currently missing from the Steam version) you can also buy the series at the VHX Double Fine Adventure website.

The closest thing that exists to this is the book The Writer's Tale by Russell T Davies about the making of the television show Doctor Who.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
8 of 13 people (62%) found this review helpful
Recommended
0.0 hrs on record
Posted: October 21, 2015
Orwell was right: The Surveillance age is here. Although not quite in the way he predicted.

Double Fine has graciously allowed 2 Player Productions to invade their personal space for the duration of the development of Broken Age, and gamers should thank them greatly; because what we got in the end was not just a game, but also the greatest video game documentary of all time. 2 Player Productions, for the first time ever, have documented the entire game development process from start to finish in an unfiltered, candid look at the great highs and crushing lows that come with making a game.
I urge you, regardless of your views on Double Fine, to pick up the documentary.
If you have never worked in game development, your perspective will widen, and you will finally get to understand the process not just from a consumer perspective, but from the perspective of a hardworking, devoted team of passionate game makers.
I sincerely believe that this documentary will change your perspective on video games, it certainly has for me.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
0.3 hrs on record
Posted: May 7
Well shot, visually impressive and interesting. It provides a good glimpse of how a game is created, from funding and budgeting, to concept building and art design, to the actual nuts and bolts development. It makes the business of making games look both rewarding and terrifying. Hours of quality documentary for $14.99 - a steal.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
4 of 8 people (50%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
Recommended
Posted: October 5, 2015
One of the best, if not THE best, documetaries on game development in existence. A lot of what game development entails is pretty boring to watch (insert person sitting at computer staring at lines of code for six straight hours here), but fortunately you don't have to endure that kind of boredom in this doc. It was filmed and edited by the brilliant team at 2 Player Productions (also famous for the Minecraft documentary and the first season of Penny Arcade The Series). They skim over all of the boring, monotonous parts of game dev and present something that is very viewer friendly. You get to see interviews with the individual team members, be a fly on the wall during team meetings, and watch each person on the team perform and describe their role. One of my favorite parts of the entire documentary is watching all of the game's concept artists have an art jam, admiring each other's work, swapping information on the utensils they are using, etc. Who doesn't love watching nerds feed off of each other's enthusiasm?

It pretty much also goes without saying that you'll get a lot of one-on-one with some legendary game industry figures including Peter Chan, Peter McConnel, Ron Gilbert, and (of course) Tim Schafer. You'll also get to see a variety of other famous faces along the way, including some behind the scenes with Jack Black, Elijiah Wood, and Jennifer Hale. Also some famous people who you never saw before until this documentary, such as Richard Horvitz (Raz in Psychonauts, Zim in Invader Zim, Dagget in Angry Beavers, etc)!

The documentary is truly a great game dev documentary because you really do get to see the good as well as the bad. On one hand, the company manages to develop and ship a successful game, so you get to see that. But you also get to see the company react to both the positive reactions and negative reactions to the game. There is also the interesting problem in the middle of development where a lot of rumors and misinformation about the project start going around and then mainstream gaming news sites start repeating it, which naturally creates a lot of distress. And even though this particular game ships as a successful project, another unannounced project gets cancelled at the very end of the doc, which results in a handful of layoffs. It is a very sad turn of events not only because layoffs are sad, but also because it is the first time the company has ever had to layoff any employees. And since you just spent the entire documentary getting to know each of the developers and even growing fond of particular ones, it is really hard to have to witness that Sophie's choice the company has to make at the end. It's interesting, if sad, to see what all of that looks like from the inside.

TLDR: Think MTV's The Real World, but with game development! And famous people!

FULL DISCLOSURE: I have been a fan of Double Fine since their first game and have been a member of their community for many years. I was a happy backer of the Double Fine Adventure kickstarter. I therefore had already watched the complete documentary before acquiring it on steam. I received my steam key as a prize in a Double Fine community contest.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny