Big Brain Wolf es una divertida aventura point-and-click para los amantes de los puzles. El jugador se pondrá en la piel de un lobo asmático vegetariano que está estudiando para convertirse en un genio. A lo largo de sus aventuras el jugador se encontrará con todo un elenco de divertidos personajes famosos y resolverá dieciséis puzles...
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Global:
Variados (72 análisis) - El 62% de los 72 análisis de los usuarios sobre este juego son positivos.
Fecha de lanzamiento: 5 nov. 2009

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Acerca de este juego

Big Brain Wolf es una divertida aventura point-and-click para los amantes de los puzles. El jugador se pondrá en la piel de un lobo asmático vegetariano que está estudiando para convertirse en un genio. A lo largo de sus aventuras el jugador se encontrará con todo un elenco de divertidos personajes famosos y resolverá dieciséis puzles diferentes. Seis ejercicios para entrenar la mente, diseñados por neurocientíficos y con un alto grado de rejugabilidad dotarán al jugador de importantes pistas para ayudarle a resolver puzles todavía más complicados.

  • 60 complejos puzles y enigmas a resolver

  • 20 escenas repletas de puzles a lo largo de los 5 capítulos de una atractiva historia

  • Un novedoso y divertido punto de vista sobre personajes universales que entretendrá a todos

  • 6 ejercicios para la mente diseñados y aprobados por los neurocientíficos del Brain Center International

  • 10 logros de STEAM originales

  • Una gran banda sonora original interpretada por un cuarteto de jazz

Requisitos del sistema

    • SO: Windows XP / Vista

    • Procesador: 1.0 Ghz

    • Memoria: 512 Mb

    • Gráficos: Cualquiera

    • DirectX®: 8.0 o superior

    • Disco Duro: 40 Mb

    • Sonido: Cualquiera

Análisis de usuarios
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Global:
Variados (72 análisis)
Publicados recientemente
Log | :^)
( 16.3 h registradas )
Publicado el 11 de marzo
It's pretty fun.
¿Es útil? No Divertido
ownosourus
( 37.0 h registradas )
Publicado el 25 de febrero
With so many titles being casual in nature, often aimed at those who are new to computer games or looking for something that can be picked up and then put down again with ease, it’s easy to overlook more substantial offerings like Big Brain Wolf. At first glance it may appear to be yet another lightweight casual title, but in reality it is a third-person puzzle-adventure game that offers more than enough content to be worthy of any adventure gamer’s attention.

The protagonist is the eponymous wolf, who is currently working through his apprenticeship as a genie. Unlike most wolves, our hero is a friendly soul who refuses to eat people and prefers the life of a vegetarian instead, much to the despair of his mother and fellow wolf clan. In order to become a proper genie, the wolf must solve puzzles armed with a pen and paper, along with some knowledge of his beloved game of chess. Yet it seems the world is against the wolf clan; with his mum arrested for the murder of Princess Red Riding Hood's grandmother, it's up to our vegetarian friend to prove her innocence while capturing the real culprit and graduating as a genie in the process.

This storyline is quite shallow, without any real surprises or sudden developments, but this is made up for by the interesting characters and the overriding fantasy theme. As you have probably guessed from the background, Big Brain Wolf is set within a land of fairytales, but with a mixture of cultural references thrown in for good measure. You'll come across the Charming family and the three pigs, dragons, Pinocchio acting as your mother's lawyer, Gepetto depicted as a mad scientist and inventor, and Tom Thumb as a celebrity superstar. Your tutor and partner-in-crime, the genie who conjures up the many puzzles you'll solve, is actually a robot, complete with wires and interesting head gear.

The fairytale theme is reflected in the cartoony visuals, filled with bright and colourful characters and backgrounds, with plenty of scenery featuring castles, beanstalks, knights, forests and dungeons that re-create the feel of living in a picture book world. If there is a criticism, it's that some of the scenes aren't very detailed, lacking the polish of a bigger budget title. It's also a shame that music and speech are fairly neglected. Only the occasional piece of jazzy music is present in certain scenes, as silence fills much of the adventure, broken only by the odd sound effect, the most common being a fanfare noise upon successfully completing a puzzle. Voice acting is also absent, with only a few lines spoken at the outset and the rest of the dialogue displayed as text.

The conversations between the genie and the wolf are the most engaging, both mocking yet helpful for getting through the many trials. On the whole, the writing is nicely done, proving to be informative and at times comical, with plenty of humour between the characters, mostly criticizing the hero's inability to be a 'proper' wolf that likes to devour things. It's the banter and descriptive comments of the world you explore that provides most of the non-puzzling entertainment, successfully making up for any shallowness in the storyline department. Videogame fans will notice the re-naming of the Xbox to the Woodbox that constantly needs to be replaced, as well as the portraits of characters named after Nintendo icons like Samus, and little touches like these are fun to discover.

Controls for the game are of the traditional point-and-click variety, where selecting items or characters on screen will allow you to interact with them, and it is possible to move to different locations by clicking directional arrows that appear. The wolf moves extremely slowly, but none of the areas are very big, so you never have long to wait. In one departure from most traditional adventures, there is no smart cursor or highlights to help you identify hotspots. Like adventure games of old, you’ll simply need to click everything to see if each object yields any useful information or results. Some puzzles require you to drag items by holding down the mouse button and moving the mouse in the necessary direction, but it’s all very intuitive.

While at first you are quite restricted to where you can go, as the adventure progresses more locations are opened up and it is possible to move freely between multiple areas without any hindrance. You can talk to everyone you meet on your quest, often triggering different lines of dialogue, even from those that have little to do with the actual plot. Puzzles often result from these conversations as new problems present themselves, whether it is trying to locate fellow wolves who can inform you about possible murder suspects, getting past security guards to visit your mum in prison, aiding Sara the sheep break out of jail in return for her help, or locating mirror fragments that contain vital clues.

With this style of puzzle-based gameplay, it's clear that Big Brain Wolf owes a lot to the likes of Professor Layton. In fact, when it comes to a handful of puzzles, such as placing queens on a chess board so their paths do not cross, the traditional hanoi blocks game and re-arranging match sticks to make particular shapes, you could swear that they came straight from the Professor’s world and into this one. Other puzzles are also heavily inspired by the popular DS series, but they are integrated well enough to make sense in context, rather than just being thrown in for the sake of it. From word games and tracing shapes using only one continuous line to shuffling blocks into certain spaces and decoding secret messages, the puzzles are quite diverse. None of them involve collecting items or inventory quests, however, as they are all logic puzzles that arise simply from clicking on points of interest in the environments or certain characters.

This wide range of puzzles varies in difficulty from simple to deceptively challenging, at which point the hint system might come in handy. You start off with a few to get you going, but rather than make it easy for you, additional hints have to be earned by playing brain exercise games, aimed at improving different aspects of memory. These include memorising sequences of colours, deciphering clocks placed in different positions, recalling names given to items on screen, and matching symbols. At the end of each minigame, your score is charted so you can see how well you are progressing with each memory activity, which is useful if you are trying to improve in different areas. How well you do determines how many points are awarded, and reaching a certain goal unlocks a new hint key.

With 60 puzzles in total there's certainly plenty of content to get to grips with, although there are a few gripes I need to mention. Since puzzles occur simply by clicking items in the background, it is possible to completely miss some that aren't essential to progressing the storyline, without any indication as to where these might be. By clicking on the genie's lamp at the corner of the screen, you can access a menu that keeps track of the storyline in each chapter, brain exercise games that can be played at any point and a list of puzzles unlocked in each chapter.

Towards the end of the game, some of the puzzles do start to repeat themselves – there are about four variants on the tower of hanoi, not to mention quite a few chess-oriented ones. While this is in keeping with the main character's passion, it is repetitive and tiresome for anyone who has little interest in the board game. The story also doesn't have much in the way of an ending, with just a couple of conversations taking place before “The End” message is displayed, which is a bit of an anti-climatic way to finish the game.

Despite its few corner-cutting measures, however, Big Brain Wolf is an enjoyable puzzle-adventure that will surprise those who may be tempted to dismiss it as yet another generic casual title clamouring for your attention.
¿Es útil? No Divertido
eliza.knight339
( 4.1 h registradas )
Publicado el 20 de febrero
great game, nice graphic, a lot of puzzles to solve, some are interesting but almost of them are pretty simple, relaxing to play, would recommend it :)
however, the character walks so slow, and puzzles are sometimes difficult to find
¿Es útil? No Divertido
Mintberry Crunch
( 8.7 h registradas )
Publicado el 3 de enero
Pretty easy game. Story was a little disappointing but game play and puzzles are fun.
¿Es útil? No Divertido
Morphy
( 18.0 h registradas )
Publicado el 30 de diciembre de 2015
Quite a tough puzzle game at times. Similar to the likes of Telltale's Puzzle Agent. I didn't like a few of the puzzles as I thought they were too hard and it seemed that in one or two of them perfectly valid answers failed to be approved so I think that is a serious flaw. Still, I'll give it the thumbs up but quite a few things could've been improved.
¿Es útil? No Divertido
archcorenth
( 12.2 h registradas )
Publicado el 19 de diciembre de 2015
Although I like this sort of game, the extremely slow movement of your character (when frankly I don't see why your character has to move at all.) is very obnoxious. Also there is too much dialogue and too many simple puzzles. But there is some interest to be had in the story, and every once in a while a strong puzzle shows up (unlike Puzzle Agent where there never was a hard puzzle.) So if you're willing to slog through all the mud it may be worth it.
¿Es útil? No Divertido
jac1002
( 7.1 h registradas )
Publicado el 24 de noviembre de 2015
Not bad,it's not a Layton game but it's not bad.
¿Es útil? No Divertido
[UM] Frungi
( 1.8 h registradas )
Publicado el 25 de octubre de 2015
If you enjoy puzzle books, but wish they were wrapped in an inconsistent adventure game about a fairy tale wolf who wants to be a genie, this is the game you’ve been looking for.

Seriously, just buy a puzzle book, you’ll have more fun. Also, do not buy this if you expect to play on an up-to-date Mac. It crashes on launch as of 10.9 and there is no developer support.
¿Es útil? No Divertido
Poorfag-chan
( 0.1 h registradas )
Publicado el 18 de septiembre de 2015
The game is unpolished, it seems like this game was finished in a rush.
Finding the puzzles is indeed harder than solving the puzzle itself.

The character walking is so slow and slowing the progress in the game.
¿Es útil? No Divertido
AntiVVeaboo
( 0.6 h registradas )
Publicado el 30 de agosto de 2015
Vniqve

point n click game

imagine aladdin + terminator haha..
¿Es útil? No Divertido
Análisis más útiles  Global
A 31 de 39 personas (79%) les ha sido útil este análisis
No recomendado
5.4 h registradas
Publicado el 28 de septiembre de 2014
A children's point and click game with bottom-barrel riddles ripped straight from professor layton. Too often I found myself unable to continue because I needed to click more than once on one specific object to progress. It tries so hard to be good but it's just

I expected relaxation and maybe fun. Instead I wound up fighting the riddle interface and simply using a guide to select the specific contrived group of pixels I needed to click on. Some riddles are straight up bull crap and don't get me started on the terribad brain training exercises.

I tried as hard as I could to enjoy it but overall I simply didn't. I did manage to laugh once or twice, but those moments weren't worth slogging through the rest of this title.
¿Te ha sido útil este análisis? No Divertido
A 14 de 14 personas (100%) les ha sido útil este análisis
1 persona ha encontrado divertido este análisis
Recomendado
37.0 h registradas
Publicado el 25 de febrero
With so many titles being casual in nature, often aimed at those who are new to computer games or looking for something that can be picked up and then put down again with ease, it’s easy to overlook more substantial offerings like Big Brain Wolf. At first glance it may appear to be yet another lightweight casual title, but in reality it is a third-person puzzle-adventure game that offers more than enough content to be worthy of any adventure gamer’s attention.

The protagonist is the eponymous wolf, who is currently working through his apprenticeship as a genie. Unlike most wolves, our hero is a friendly soul who refuses to eat people and prefers the life of a vegetarian instead, much to the despair of his mother and fellow wolf clan. In order to become a proper genie, the wolf must solve puzzles armed with a pen and paper, along with some knowledge of his beloved game of chess. Yet it seems the world is against the wolf clan; with his mum arrested for the murder of Princess Red Riding Hood's grandmother, it's up to our vegetarian friend to prove her innocence while capturing the real culprit and graduating as a genie in the process.

This storyline is quite shallow, without any real surprises or sudden developments, but this is made up for by the interesting characters and the overriding fantasy theme. As you have probably guessed from the background, Big Brain Wolf is set within a land of fairytales, but with a mixture of cultural references thrown in for good measure. You'll come across the Charming family and the three pigs, dragons, Pinocchio acting as your mother's lawyer, Gepetto depicted as a mad scientist and inventor, and Tom Thumb as a celebrity superstar. Your tutor and partner-in-crime, the genie who conjures up the many puzzles you'll solve, is actually a robot, complete with wires and interesting head gear.

The fairytale theme is reflected in the cartoony visuals, filled with bright and colourful characters and backgrounds, with plenty of scenery featuring castles, beanstalks, knights, forests and dungeons that re-create the feel of living in a picture book world. If there is a criticism, it's that some of the scenes aren't very detailed, lacking the polish of a bigger budget title. It's also a shame that music and speech are fairly neglected. Only the occasional piece of jazzy music is present in certain scenes, as silence fills much of the adventure, broken only by the odd sound effect, the most common being a fanfare noise upon successfully completing a puzzle. Voice acting is also absent, with only a few lines spoken at the outset and the rest of the dialogue displayed as text.

The conversations between the genie and the wolf are the most engaging, both mocking yet helpful for getting through the many trials. On the whole, the writing is nicely done, proving to be informative and at times comical, with plenty of humour between the characters, mostly criticizing the hero's inability to be a 'proper' wolf that likes to devour things. It's the banter and descriptive comments of the world you explore that provides most of the non-puzzling entertainment, successfully making up for any shallowness in the storyline department. Videogame fans will notice the re-naming of the Xbox to the Woodbox that constantly needs to be replaced, as well as the portraits of characters named after Nintendo icons like Samus, and little touches like these are fun to discover.

Controls for the game are of the traditional point-and-click variety, where selecting items or characters on screen will allow you to interact with them, and it is possible to move to different locations by clicking directional arrows that appear. The wolf moves extremely slowly, but none of the areas are very big, so you never have long to wait. In one departure from most traditional adventures, there is no smart cursor or highlights to help you identify hotspots. Like adventure games of old, you’ll simply need to click everything to see if each object yields any useful information or results. Some puzzles require you to drag items by holding down the mouse button and moving the mouse in the necessary direction, but it’s all very intuitive.

While at first you are quite restricted to where you can go, as the adventure progresses more locations are opened up and it is possible to move freely between multiple areas without any hindrance. You can talk to everyone you meet on your quest, often triggering different lines of dialogue, even from those that have little to do with the actual plot. Puzzles often result from these conversations as new problems present themselves, whether it is trying to locate fellow wolves who can inform you about possible murder suspects, getting past security guards to visit your mum in prison, aiding Sara the sheep break out of jail in return for her help, or locating mirror fragments that contain vital clues.

With this style of puzzle-based gameplay, it's clear that Big Brain Wolf owes a lot to the likes of Professor Layton. In fact, when it comes to a handful of puzzles, such as placing queens on a chess board so their paths do not cross, the traditional hanoi blocks game and re-arranging match sticks to make particular shapes, you could swear that they came straight from the Professor’s world and into this one. Other puzzles are also heavily inspired by the popular DS series, but they are integrated well enough to make sense in context, rather than just being thrown in for the sake of it. From word games and tracing shapes using only one continuous line to shuffling blocks into certain spaces and decoding secret messages, the puzzles are quite diverse. None of them involve collecting items or inventory quests, however, as they are all logic puzzles that arise simply from clicking on points of interest in the environments or certain characters.

This wide range of puzzles varies in difficulty from simple to deceptively challenging, at which point the hint system might come in handy. You start off with a few to get you going, but rather than make it easy for you, additional hints have to be earned by playing brain exercise games, aimed at improving different aspects of memory. These include memorising sequences of colours, deciphering clocks placed in different positions, recalling names given to items on screen, and matching symbols. At the end of each minigame, your score is charted so you can see how well you are progressing with each memory activity, which is useful if you are trying to improve in different areas. How well you do determines how many points are awarded, and reaching a certain goal unlocks a new hint key.

With 60 puzzles in total there's certainly plenty of content to get to grips with, although there are a few gripes I need to mention. Since puzzles occur simply by clicking items in the background, it is possible to completely miss some that aren't essential to progressing the storyline, without any indication as to where these might be. By clicking on the genie's lamp at the corner of the screen, you can access a menu that keeps track of the storyline in each chapter, brain exercise games that can be played at any point and a list of puzzles unlocked in each chapter.

Towards the end of the game, some of the puzzles do start to repeat themselves – there are about four variants on the tower of hanoi, not to mention quite a few chess-oriented ones. While this is in keeping with the main character's passion, it is repetitive and tiresome for anyone who has little interest in the board game. The story also doesn't have much in the way of an ending, with just a couple of conversations taking place before “The End” message is displayed, which is a bit of an anti-climatic way to finish the game.

Despite its few corner-cutting measures, however, Big Brain Wolf is an enjoyable puzzle-adventure that will surprise those who may be tempted to dismiss it as yet another generic casual title clamouring for your attention.
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A 58 de 94 personas (62%) les ha sido útil este análisis
3 personas han encontrado divertido este análisis
Recomendado
Publicado el 22 de septiembre de 2011
this seems to be a furry version of poker night with strongbad
¿Te ha sido útil este análisis? No Divertido
A 14 de 16 personas (88%) les ha sido útil este análisis
Recomendado
4.3 h registradas
Publicado el 24 de diciembre de 2014
A hybrid adventure/puzzle game that will really get you scratching your noodle. While the story will progress in classic point n click fashion, most of time will be spent trying to tackle logic puzzles that will really put brain to the test.

As progress through the story, you are going to encounter characters and objects that will require you to tackle these puzzles to continue. Word puzzles, numbers games, shape situations; the types of puzzles run the game.

Game: 6.5/10
Graphic: 6.5/10

100% Achievement : Easy | Medium | Hard | Very Hard
¿Te ha sido útil este análisis? No Divertido
A 16 de 20 personas (80%) les ha sido útil este análisis
No recomendado
0.9 h registradas
Publicado el 4 de julio de 2013
While this game could have potentially been a fun relaxed puzzle solving game, it utterly and completely fails due to instructions being vague, unclear, and flat out incomplete.

Worse, the interface for several puzzles is simply not thought out in the slightest, so you end up fighting the interface and/or trying to see around it.

It also doesn't help that the graphical display looks to have been built around a 486 with 640x320 resolution.

Don't waste your money on this garbage.
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A 14 de 18 personas (78%) les ha sido útil este análisis
No recomendado
0.1 h registradas
Publicado el 18 de septiembre de 2015
The game is unpolished, it seems like this game was finished in a rush.
Finding the puzzles is indeed harder than solving the puzzle itself.

The character walking is so slow and slowing the progress in the game.
¿Te ha sido útil este análisis? No Divertido
A 13 de 17 personas (76%) les ha sido útil este análisis
Recomendado
12.3 h registradas
Publicado el 4 de julio de 2014
A point and click puzzler which tries hard but could do better. The game play is overly simplified by highlighting the clues in the conversation rather than allowing players to spot them, Many of the mini puzzles have more than one way to complete but the game will only accept one version so, unless you cheat, you may take several attempts trying to find the acceptable answer.

The "Training Day" steam achievement is difficult to achieve whilst also going for the "Genius" achievement as there is a limit on the number of keys you can create and if you are not using hints you cant clear your key chain. If this happens and you are a completist you can just start a new game.

Despite all the above and the poor score I would recommend this game to anyone who has had a stroke or brain injury as well as for young players as there are enough challenges to build/rebuild neural pathways.

54:100
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A 8 de 9 personas (89%) les ha sido útil este análisis
No recomendado
6.4 h registradas
Publicado el 16 de abril de 2015
Not recommended, could have been so much better as a game. Strangest thing is, finding the puzzles is a lot harden then actually solving the puzzles. Style and and story are not too bad but gameplay is. Some of the puzzles are just vague or accept only a specific solution.
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A 12 de 17 personas (71%) les ha sido útil este análisis
Recomendado
5.5 h registradas
Publicado el 25 de diciembre de 2014
Many puzzles await for you, and I mean this game has various types of puzzles. If you are boring of hidden object game, you should try this one, it's great after all.
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A 13 de 19 personas (68%) les ha sido útil este análisis
1 persona ha encontrado divertido este análisis
Recomendado
15.4 h registradas
Publicado el 3 de marzo de 2014
A witty point-and-click adventure story with puzzles...although some puzzles are a bit too hard. It's still a funny story nonetheless for teenagers or adults to get into. I just wish they left out the voice acting at the beginning(BECAUSE IT'S TERRIBLE.)
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