Out There is an award-winning space exploration game blending roguelike, resource management and interactive fiction.
User reviews:
Recent:
Mixed (20 reviews) - 65% of the 20 user reviews in the last 30 days are positive.
Overall:
Very Positive (540 reviews) - 80% of the 540 user reviews for this game are positive.
Release Date: Apr 2, 2015

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Buy Out There: Ω Edition

Buy Out There: Ω Edition + Soundtrack

 

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March 28

Multiverse 2: Galactic Dusk - 40% OFF



The second Multiverse update for Out There: Ω Edition is now available on Steam!

New game mode : Galactic Dusk
In this new game mode, every solar system turns into a black hole when you leave it! This game mode is perfect for seasoned players looking for a new challenge. Their bravery will be rewarded with bonus points for exploring. Time to restart the Wormhole Generator!

New technology : Stellar Embryo
Out There isn’t an easy game. With this new technology, you'll be able to create a clone of yourself in a derelict ship! Then, when you'll meet your death, you'll restart where you left your baby. And prepare for a second death!

New technology : Symbiotic Expansion
With this technology, much requested by the community, it’s finally possible to add storage slots to your ship! You won' t be able to build modules in the expansion, but you won't need to stop at every gas planet!

Known issues
Ending dialogues are displaying incorect text.
A quick fix is coming.

5 comments Read more

Reviews

“I thoroughly enjoyed Out There: Omega Edition. Hopping from one system to the next not knowing what will be discovered was a constant thrill.”
True PC Gaming

“This is Gravity in which everything usually goes as wrong as it supposed to, yet somehow the astronaut remains calm, even lyrical, throughout”
Rock, Paper, Shotgun

“For those looking to explore the vast reaches of space in a narrative based storyline.”
9.2/10 – Universal Gaming Reviews

About This Game

Out There is an award-winning space exploration game blending roguelike, resource management and interactive fiction.

You are an astronaut awaking from cryonics not in the solar system, but... out there... in a far and unknown place of the galaxy. In Out There, you will have to survive, tinkering your ship with what you can gather drifting in the void, and spot garden planets to refill your oxygen supply.

Space is an hostile place ; dangerous and mysterious adventures will mark each step of your travel. You will not only meet intelligent species that won’t care about you, but also deal with ancient powers linked to your destiny and the fate of mankind itself.

Survival and understanding of what is really at stake in the galaxy is the core of what Out There has to offer.

FEATURES
• A dark adventure in deep space
• 59 achievements, leaderboard
• Explore a freshly procedurally-generated galaxy every time
• 350+ unique text adventures with multiple choices
• Epic main storyline leading to 4 different endings
• 10 spaceships with different specs to discover
• Crafting system with 20 alien technologies built from 15 materials
• Engage with alien life forms and learn their language
• No combat! it’s you against the environment
• Eerie score by award-winning composer Siddhartha Barnhoorn (Antichamber, The Stanley Parable) featuring vocals by Lara Ausensi (Forest Kingdom II, Shevannai - The Voice of Elves)
• Fantastic pulp comics graphics
• High replay value

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
SteamOS + Linux
    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows XP (SP3)
    • Processor: Dual Core 2Ghz
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Hardware Accelerated Graphics with dedicated memory
    • Storage: 500 MB available space
    Recommended:
    • OS: Windows 7 or higher
    • Processor: Dual Core 4Ghz
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Hardware Accelerated Graphics with 1GB memory
    • Storage: 500 MB available space
    Minimum:
    • OS: Mac OS X 10.7
    • Processor: Dual Core 2Ghz
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Hardware Accelerated Graphics with dedicated memory
    • Storage: 500 MB available space
    Recommended:
    • OS: OS X 10.7 or higher
    • Processor: Dual Core 4Ghz
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Hardware Accelerated Graphics with 1GB memory
    • Storage: 500 MB available space
    Minimum:
    • OS: Ubuntu 10.10
    • Processor: Dual Core 2Ghz
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Hardware Accelerated Graphics with dedicated memory
    • Storage: 500 MB available space
    Recommended:
    • OS: Ubuntu 10.10 or higher
    • Processor: Dual Core 4Ghz
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Hardware Accelerated Graphics with 1GB memory
    • Storage: 500 MB available space
Customer reviews
Customer Review system updated! Learn more
Recent:
Mixed (20 reviews)
Overall:
Very Positive (540 reviews)
Recently Posted
bluewulf
22.8 hrs
Posted: August 28
The Devs missed an opportunity to make this a fun game rather than a frustrating one -- You invariably run out of minerals unless you have extreme luck and the game is over. But if they allowed you to put two or three existing minerals you do have together into a device that would create the mineral you need to continue, now that would be fun and keep you interested. As it is it's too difficult and too simplistic. I give it a 65 out of 100.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
RogueXXXWookie
7.0 hrs
Posted: August 27
Challenging, fun, also addicting! Great concept as well. I personally like the inventory management, and the alien lifeform interaction. Definitely a smaller version of No Mans Sky. I enjoy this much and look foreward to playing more!
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Haze
2.2 hrs
Posted: August 23
If you're butthurt about No Man's Sky, this is the closest 2D alternative to that. Nearly identical, but not quite. Aside from that, I don't recommend this game. There's no real incentive to keep you playing and playing just to get to the objective. However, I found that the most interesting parts of the game are your logs between systems, so I think I would've preferred this more as a text adventure.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Kevlaur
7.2 hrs
Posted: August 21
Fun game, but I've been unable to 'continue' a previous game.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
BoxTar
2.8 hrs
Posted: August 16
Some great concepts are involved in this game, but ultimately it falls flat. From things such as the tedious resource management and scavanging, to the brutal difficulty and unforgiving amount of RNG (even on Easy I can barely make it through 15 destinations), and the lack of gameplay variety really drags the experience down.

I like the design of the aliens, the language mechanics, the art style, and the music. It plays smoothly. Its polished. But its dull and repetitive. Only get this if you enjoy the grind and don't mind unforgiving difficulty at the hand of RNJesus. It can be a nice game to chill to, but nothing that amounts to an active, engaging experience.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
fatalis.shan.ian
7.0 hrs
Posted: August 15
7.5/10 - It's like No Man's Sky but cheap, functional, and not overhyped.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
vero.induni
8.7 hrs
Posted: August 13
I was very optimistic about this game.

On the plus side, the encounters with aliens are interesting and the fact they all have different languages is pretty fun. But I got bored by the situation the game puts you in. You get fuel on planets and you use it to travel to other planets to get oxygen to survive and metals to fix your ship. You will use the oxygen again to find another planet with fuel and your equipment will get damaged when you get it and so on... Basically you get stuck in a loop of getting fuel, oxygen and metals; all which turns to be pretty boring after a couple minutes.

You only get a little action when you find another ship or when you are asked to make a choice.

It still does not make up for the boredom that settles quite quickly.

This game would have been more interesting had the ressources not vanished/been used so quickly, restricting your moves.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
GiJoe0202
3.7 hrs
Posted: August 12
Enjoy the exploration, sometimes I run out of fuel after about 5 jumps finding none which is frustrating. Otherwise I enjoy the challenge of maintaining the 3 resources.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
sand977
16.9 hrs
Posted: August 10
Just played 4 runs today. Great game! I really like the simplicity and the sheer explorative spirit.

The things I think need fixing - when you visit a station that replentishes Oxigen and your ship is Oxygen fueled it should also refuel! Similarly with other such occasions. Just makes more sense.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
The Cat With The Gat
31.2 hrs
Posted: August 8
Lost in the dark, dissociating abyss of space you must find your way back to humanity. In this excellent indie space exploration rouge-like you will travel red dwarfs and blue giants fighting for survival, exploring planets, discovering new technologies and ships, mining for elements, learning alien languages, all randomly generated each play through. With an awesome comic-book styled 2D artstyle and a surreal, alienating sense of being lost this game certainly makes a great game for sci-fi and space exploration fans!

I feel like I'm relearning the periodic table collecting all these elements and this game is definitely top-notch if you like to trip out! A great tide over till No Man's Sky comes out!
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Most Helpful Reviews  In the past 30 days
18 of 26 people (69%) found this review helpful
Recommended
7.0 hrs on record
Posted: August 15
7.5/10 - It's like No Man's Sky but cheap, functional, and not overhyped.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
5 of 7 people (71%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
8.7 hrs on record
Posted: August 13
I was very optimistic about this game.

On the plus side, the encounters with aliens are interesting and the fact they all have different languages is pretty fun. But I got bored by the situation the game puts you in. You get fuel on planets and you use it to travel to other planets to get oxygen to survive and metals to fix your ship. You will use the oxygen again to find another planet with fuel and your equipment will get damaged when you get it and so on... Basically you get stuck in a loop of getting fuel, oxygen and metals; all which turns to be pretty boring after a couple minutes.

You only get a little action when you find another ship or when you are asked to make a choice.

It still does not make up for the boredom that settles quite quickly.

This game would have been more interesting had the ressources not vanished/been used so quickly, restricting your moves.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
2 of 4 people (50%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
2.8 hrs on record
Posted: August 16
Some great concepts are involved in this game, but ultimately it falls flat. From things such as the tedious resource management and scavanging, to the brutal difficulty and unforgiving amount of RNG (even on Easy I can barely make it through 15 destinations), and the lack of gameplay variety really drags the experience down.

I like the design of the aliens, the language mechanics, the art style, and the music. It plays smoothly. Its polished. But its dull and repetitive. Only get this if you enjoy the grind and don't mind unforgiving difficulty at the hand of RNJesus. It can be a nice game to chill to, but nothing that amounts to an active, engaging experience.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
Most Helpful Reviews  Overall
335 of 387 people (87%) found this review helpful
2 people found this review funny
Not Recommended
3.1 hrs on record
Posted: April 2, 2015
This is more a mixed review than a negative one.

I bought Out There because it looked similar to FTL, but without the tedium of combat, and in that respect it did not disappoint. Like the starship Voyager, you jump from system to system trying to replenish limited resources, and along the way you meet alien lifeforms and learn new technologies that increase your chances of reaching home. I think the game aptly portrays the feeling of isolation in space, from the ambient soundtrack to the uneasy log entries of the protagonist, a lone astronaut who wakes from cryo-sleep to find himself far across the galaxy.

However, in going from FTL to Out There, I seem to have traded one form of monotony for another. Drilling rocky planets yields iron to repair your hull, but landing on and leaving those planets costs additional fuel. Probing gas giants yields fuel necessary to travel from system to system, but orbiting those planets damages your ship's hull. If either resource (or oxygen) reaches zero, your session ends. Drill, probe, drill, probe. From my experience so far- about three hours- I'd say this routine forms the bulk of each session, which I personally find uninteresting.

There never seems to be enough space to really exploit the technologies you learn on most ship types. Each technology takes up one slot, and most of the ships I've seen so far have no more than a dozen total. Not to mention, around five of those slots will always be taken up by your most essential ship systems. In addition, each unique element / resource takes up its own slot regardless of how little you have of each, and some technologies require multiple elements for construction. Keep in mind the technologies you learn each session are randomized, so you won't know which metals you'll need at the outset, either. Often I just didn't bother with technology so I could stockpile the three basic necessities, since each slot only stacks up to twenty, and you often need more.

When you meet alien lifeforms, you're usually presented with a choice of Approve or Disapprove, but because you don't know the languages spoken, and because translated words don't carry over from session to session, you may as well flip a coin unless you're writing down all the words you learn on the side. The other events with choices feel equally arbitrary, though I acknowledge this was also built into the design of FTL and may not faze everyone.

In short, if the premise and feeling of the game are what interest you, and the above issues don't bother you, there's a good chance you'll enjoy Out There. If what you're looking for is mechanical depth and varied gameplay, I'd caution you to take a closer look before buying.
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150 of 184 people (82%) found this review helpful
8 people found this review funny
Recommended
2.7 hrs on record
Posted: April 3, 2015
Out There: Ω Edition is a resource management rogue-like game which recently released on Steam after huge success on mobile platforms. In Out There: Ω Edition you play as an astronaut who has just woken up from cryogenic stasis on a journey from Earth to Ganymede, you quickly realise you've gone horribly off course and you're nowhere near your destination, you're out there. You must carefully manage your fuel, oxygen and hull in order to stay alive in an unexplored galaxy, along the way you will not only find remnants of the human race who have mysteriously vanished but you will also find alien races and alien artifacts never before seen by man. Out There: Ω Edition is a story about the survival of one man who is way out of his depth on a journey that shouldn't have taken place.

This game has a fair few similarities to FTL: Faster Than Light, in fact it's these similarities that made me buy the game, so you'll see me compare the two games a couple of times over the course of the review. I'm a huge fan of anything Space related and this title did not disappoint

+Gorgeous art style
+Everything in the game is well designed, in particular the ships and the alien life forms
+There are several different ships, each coming with pros and cons meaning each ship has a unique play style
+Usually when you jump to a new star system you get a journal entry/mini text adventure which all have great stories but they're let down by the writer's knowledge of English (I'll come back to that later)
+The galaxy is procedurally generated each time you play so you'll never see the same galaxy twice
+Interesting storyline with an interesting yet mysterious protagonist
+Outstanding (even outstanding doesn't do it justice) soundtrack that even rivals that of FTL
+Great gameplay based around resource management, kind of like FTL with more resources and no combat
+The game has no combat, a bold move that work fantastically, fighting to survive against the environment is much more interesting than fighting to survive against hostile life forms
+As you get further into a run you begin unlocking more advanced technologies to help you get further
+Abandoned ships always seem to turn up just as your ship becomes obsolete which is perfect
+When you encounter alien life forms you often learn parts of their language
+You frequently come across mysterious alien materials and artifacts which often provide ways of improving your ship
+It's impossible to see everything this game has to offer in one run so you're definitely going to come back for more

+/-When something goes wrong, such as your Hydrogen probe being destroyed, it's incredibly unlikely that you're gonna make it since when something goes wrong in this game EVERYTHING goes wrong

-The game is riddled with poor grammar and spelling mistakes which really takes away from the fantastic story in this game, in all fairness the Dev is foreign and English is probably his/her second language but I still don't see why they couldn't have had someone proof read the game

Verdict:
9

Despite the game's numerous spelling errors and grammatical errors this is a fantastic resource management game with a gorgeous art style and fantastic design.

El K.
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68 of 82 people (83%) found this review helpful
4 people found this review funny
Recommended
7.9 hrs on record
Posted: April 6, 2015
This game barely gets a thumbs up from be (mainly because its a new concept, nice art, nice music etc.). The biggest problem is that the game is 90% based on luck. No matter how good you are at the game, you always depend on luck to constantly find planets with enough fuel, iron and oxygen.
Just be prepared to get frustrated a lot. For example even though you captured an amazing new ship, spent a lot of time discovering new technology, collecting the rare resources to build tech upgrades etc. etc. And then, bam, a random event makes you lose half of your fuel, and you end up in a solar system without any gas planets. Game over in two turns, and nothing you could do about it. This happens A LOT!
Unfortunately, the devs don't wanna hear anything about it. check the forums, they wanna keep this game a game of chance, to somehow show you the "thoughness" of space travel or whatever. I think its sad, the game could be so much better and more skill based...
I hope modders will fix it, like it happened with FTL.
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64 of 76 people (84%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
Not Recommended
11.6 hrs on record
Posted: May 19, 2015
I really wish I could have enjoyed this game more, my first 5-10 playthrough's were fantastic, and you get this great sense of exploration in an isolated, alien galaxy.

Sadly it's downfall is it's difficulty, not that difficulty is outright a bad thing, in fact it's part of the roguelike genre I love. But in this title your chances of survival are 90% luck, 10% follwing an identical formula for the best chances at success.

It's a game about exploration and discovery. Yet it just rips you down again and again, forcing you to repeat from the beginning. Which is basically the same strategy for the first 20-30 stars anyway, and quickly becomes monotonous. The difficulty would be bearable if there was a huge amount of gameplay variation, but you'll find yourself seeing repeated events constantly after only a few runs. But realistically even though there are a lot of events that happen, at the end of the day no matter what happens it can only affect your fuel, oxygen and hull. Which ultimately limits the game.
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49 of 56 people (88%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
1.4 hrs on record
Posted: June 26
Relies way way too much on RNG for "difficulty". You never know when it might just arbitrarily decide to end your game through no real fault of your own. Even when you think you're doing really well you could be two random "events" or one bad planet line up from death. Since you always begin with the same ship and tech there's no way to try different strategies or approachs. You're just relying on the RNG to be kind enough to let you live.

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45 of 53 people (85%) found this review helpful
4 people found this review funny
Recommended
5.4 hrs on record
Posted: December 13, 2015
In 2014, developer Mi-Clos Studio released Out There, a space exploration title for iOS and Android devices. The game was a critical hit, winning awards and gaining rave reviews across the board, with praise for the game’s story and depth. Out There was commercially successful too, selling over 250,000 copies worldwide.

Now the French developer released the acclaimed mobile title for PC, Mac, and Linux, with a wealth of new features and content available. Mi-Clos Studio is also making the new version, titled Out There: Omega Edition, free for any buyers of the original mobile-only build. Gamers who had yet to play the title now have the chance to encounter Out There beyond its mobile beginnings.

Out There is a space-based roguelike, placing a single player into the role of an astronaut who has become lost in an unknown part of the universe. The astronaut must travel to different stars, collecting fuel, oxygen and mineral supplies to try and survive. The end goal is to reach a distant system that promises to reveal secrets about not only the astronaut’s destiny, but the fate of mankind. Players face a procedurally-generated journey from system to system, meaning that each playthrough is different.

It is all to easy to compare Out There to FTL: Faster Than Light, another space-based roguelike. There are, however, a number of differences between the two games. Most importantly, Out There is devoid of combat, and players will not face firefights against opposing spacecraft. Although this may make it seem like players are in for an easy ride, the opposite is true. Indeed, Out There may well be crueler than the Subset Games-developed title.

Out There’s gameplay is entirely based around vulnerability and survival. Players are not able to rely on firepower to escape dangerous situations, and the bulk of the gameplay is instead focused around resource management. Keeping tabs on fuel, air, and hull stability is essential, with different elements repairing or refilling the Fuel, Oxygen, and Hull meters. These elements can be found by mining ore-rich planets to repair the hull, probing gas giants for hydrogen and helium for fuel, and landing on garden planets to refill oxygen supplies.

In a strange way, this means that the game almost plays out like the galaxy exploration mini-games of the Mass Effect series, particularly Mass Effect 2. As a result, if players found the planet-probing moments of Bioware’s series less-than-enthralling, then Out There might not be entertaining. The majority of the early gameplay is made up of three different proactive gameplay moments: sending probes for fuel, mining ore planets, and landing on garden planets. This worked incredibly well on mobile platforms, but home computer players may be left wanting more.

Thankfully, there is plenty to keep players occupied beyond the actual proactive gameplay itself. Out There plays almost as a minimalist adventure story, with text boxes revealing the inner thoughts of the astronaut and locations and events he discovers. Players will also be met with binary choices along the way, such as how to react to unknown creatures and objects in the void. The results can go two ways, rewarding players with additional material and items, or damaging the ship.

The additional items add even more tough choices for players to face. Each new module for the ship, such as shield generators to decease hull damage, takes up space in the cargo hold. Adding a new tool will mean there is less space for fuel, minerals, and oxygen. Players will have to make the decision about what elements must be dropped, and whether new modules are worth keeping over mineral supplies.

The player will also be given the chance to transfer over to new ships, abandoning the human-built craft for alien designs. These ships contain spacefaring tools of their own, as well as upgrades in cargo space – as long as the player is able to repair different parts of the alien vessel. Meanwhile, the player can also meet bizarre monoliths out in the void, granting players with new locations to discover and further developing the game’s story.

It’s not just alien craft that the player discovers, either, as Out There’s garden planets often contain life of their own. Mi-Clos has created a number of bizarre alien races for the player to make contact with. As the player meets and interacts with other races, they gain more and more alien vocabulary, and can slowly begin deciphering the unfamiliar language. Successful negotiations with sentient beings have their own rewards, with new items and the rare and vital Omega element, capable of fixing any of the three main ship components.

The brief meetings with alien races only intensify the feeling of isolation that Out There provides. Mi-Clos Studio’s title is incredibly successful in creating a sense of loneliness, meaning that every moment of contact with another race seems extremely important for the astronaut’s wellbeing. Out There nails down the idea of the cosmos being a dangerous and expansive void, which is lost all-too often in other spaced-based games. In terms of science fiction video games, this is 2001: A Space Odyssey to FTL’s original Star Trek.

The title has plenty of influence from science fiction of days gone by, particularly in terms of the graphical style. Out There has a pulp sci-fi feel, comparable to old-school sci-fi comics, and the vibrant color palette includes Hotline Miami-esque neon-soaked moments to create a varied and complex universe. It works well with the sparse writing, and marries brilliantly with the game’s ambient electronic soundtrack, created by Antichamber composer Siddhartha Barnhoorn. Out There’s music is gentle and unobtrusive, creating a deceptive calm.

It’s a calm that could be needed, however, as Out There does have the potential to frustrate. The cosmos can be cruel and unforgiving, and the random nature of the game’s universe means that a player’s skill will not always dictate success. Star systems will not always contain gas giants or garden planets, and an unlucky encounter on the way to another system could see severe damage done to the ship hull. If a playthrough is unsuccessful, however, it will not be long before players will want to start another, such is the desire to discover more of the game’s universe.

Out There has translated to home computers with ease, taking on the extra content required in its stride. The title avoids a number of science fiction tropes, and the bold move to avoid combat mechanics gives Out There its own place in space-based video games. Although the gameplay itself may prove tiresome over long periods, the game’s story elements, sense of isolation, and soundtrack make Out There a more-than-worthwhile purchase.
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48 of 61 people (79%) found this review helpful
9 people found this review funny
Recommended
14.7 hrs on record
Posted: April 4, 2015
This game is frustrating as hell, and it will murder you hundreds of times without mercy.

It's also immersive and interesting to play. It doesn't hand you anything, so when you finally do attain some success you really feel the value of it. It manages to maintain a sense of quiet anxiety and an atmosphere of loneliness in the depths of space.

If you can handle some frustration and you're interested in seeing how far you can get before either madness or entropy claims you then check it out.
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