Armikrog is a unique stop motion clay animated point and click adventure game from the creators of Earthworm Jim and the Neverhood. Unravel the mysteries of the fortress that holds Tommynaut and his blind alien talking dog Beak-Beak captive through exploration and puzzle solving!
User reviews:
Recent:
Mostly Positive (19 reviews) - 73% of the 19 user reviews in the last 30 days are positive.
Overall:
Mixed (758 reviews) - 49% of the 758 user reviews for this game are positive.
Release Date: Sep 30, 2015

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About This Game

Armikrog is a unique stop motion clay animated point and click adventure game from the creators of Earthworm Jim and the Neverhood. Follow the adventures of space explorer Tommynaut and his blind alien talking dog Beak-Beak, as they unravel the mysteries of the fortress that holds them captive through exploration and puzzle solving!

• Follow the adventures of space explorer Tommynaut and his blind alien talking dog Beak-Beak, as they unravel the mysteries of the fortress that holds them captive through exploration and puzzle solving!
• Loveable characters designed by Doug TenNapel creator of the Earthworm Jim and developed by creators of The Neverhood, Ed Schofield and Mike Dietz.
• Rich cast of voiceover talent brings Armikrog’s characters to life, including well-known actors Jon Heder (Napoleon Dynamite), Rob Paulsen (Pinky and the Brain) and Michael J. Nelson (Mystery Science Theater 3000).
• Original soundtrack created and recorded by American songwriter and record producer Terry Scott Taylor.

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
SteamOS + Linux
    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows XP+
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Pentium 4 or equivalent
    • DirectX: Version 9.0
    • Storage: 2 GB available space
    Minimum:
    • OS: Mac OSX 10.8
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Intel HD 2000 Graphics
    • Storage: 2 GB available space
    Minimum:
    • OS: Ubuntu 14.04 LTS or SteamOS
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Intel HD 2000 Graphics
    • Storage: 2 GB available space
Customer reviews
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Recent:
Mostly Positive (19 reviews)
Overall:
Mixed (758 reviews)
Recently Posted
markornikov
( 1.9 hrs on record )
Posted: July 23
Pro:

- nice visuals, although the neverhood was better
- music is ok

Cons: (everything else)

- boring and repeating puzzles
- visuals of mixed quality
- no humour
- characters barely speak
- broken save system, lost progress twice because a) the autosave is worthless and b) savegames don't overwrite
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Dr. Kebin
( 4.0 hrs on record )
Posted: July 16
This game was a huge disappointment for me. I may have set my hopes up much too high. However, this is not at all a bad game, but one that didn't live up to the standards that Doug TenNapel set when creating both Earthworm Jim and The Neverhood. I loved The Neverhood and in fact just beat it a month before learning that this game was being released. So naturally I preordered Armikrog and the Sound Track (which was phenomenal as expected).

The Good

  • The music was by far my favorite part of the entire game. Terry Scott Taylor's rambling vocals and the odd instrumentation help to give this game even more quirk than it already has.
  • The visuals of the game are beautiful--possibly even more so than that of The Neverhood. The mixture of clay (or plastic that is formed to look like clay), paper, and other craft objects is an art style that has never been pulled off quite as well as Doug TenNapel's projects have.
  • The cut scenes, which were often humorous (to an extent) were reminiscent of The Neverhood at times.
  • Of course, a good point and click game would not be complete without some good puzzles. They were quite a bit easier than that of The Neverhood.
  • The addition of a second character in a Donkey Kong Country-style fashion definitely added another dimension to the gameplay.

The Bad

  • The crying baby mini game felt monotonous. This was the only puzzle that threw me off at first. When I finally figured it out, it just became irritating to have to do several other times.
  • The ending was very anticlimactic. Compared to the The Neverhood, which had both a good and bad ending, the ending for this game was much too simple and boring. Vognaut was not a menacing villain like Klogg was. There was no buildup to his arrival and I wish that the story behind the three astronauts was explored much more.
  • The length of the game was a major issue for me. While The Neverhood takes between 6 and 10 hours to complete on average (took me 8 hours), Armikrog suffered in length. It took me between 3 and 4 hours to beat. However, this could be because the game had much less backtracking and scavenger hunting. That can be viewed as a good or bad thing.
  • Most of the puzzles felt too damn easy. The ones that were difficult on the other hand, were too damn difficult out of nowhere.
  • The characters never talk to one another during gameplay. It feels silent and awkward. Much of the cutscene dialogue feels forced.

OVERALL
Give the game a chance. I can't say it's not worth a shot. Wait for it to go on sale though.

If you have never played The Neverhood, you are in for a treat. If you are only here for nostalgia, this game will definitely fuel it. But if you're expecting something close to a Neverhood 2, you will be a bit disappointed.

(Sidenote, I missed the first-person views but I think that probably would've extended the amount of time it took to create by even more. I also would've liked to see a spaceship level or something along the lines.)
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Dion
( 3.0 hrs on record )
Posted: July 6
While relatively short, this game is decent. If you don't mind the claymation style, which I think has a sort of charm. As for anyone and everyone expecting this to be some sort of grand masterpiece, IT'S AN OLD-SCHOOL POINT-AND-CLICK. Not everything can be Monkey Island. To those that panned the game, did you ever play all the old puzzle P&C's before? It's an older genre, maybe it hasn't aged the best, but this is it. Myst, The Day The World Broke, all the old titles that used very limited animated elements on a static set. It's done by the people who did The Neverhood, and that game came out in 1996. This wasn't supposed to be innovative, or amazing, or the next CoD, it's nostalgic. Pure and simple reminiscing. The tech may have gotten better, but they went with the old formula with new tools, by choice.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Flexis
( 6.3 hrs on record )
Posted: July 4
Armikrog is a great game. Interesting puzzles, funny sceenes and good soundtrack.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
yousodumb24
( 3.9 hrs on record )
Posted: July 3
I'm honestly not sure about how I feel about Armikrog. On one hand, it perfectly captures the feel, style and quality of the neverhood, but on the other, I felt wanting. The game was very short, full of glitches and kinda ham-handidly handled its ending. But at the same time I'm compelled to recomend it, warts and all to anyone who enjoys old style adventure games.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Guma # firewall
( 3.7 hrs on record )
Posted: July 3
As much as I appreciate that they made a sequel I must say that it was to short. However it gave me this small comeback to my childhood when I played Neverhood! Thanks!
Helpful? Yes No Funny
JohnFensworth
( 3.8 hrs on record )
Posted: June 30
This game gets a bad rap. Feels pretty much just like The Neverhood, only perhaps a little bit less slapstick/silly. Same style of puzzles, gameplay, and story. A little disappointed by the music, as it's more ambient and less goofy than in the past, but perhaps Terry Taylor isn't as wild in his old age. Regardless, it was still a nice revisit to Doug TenNapel's art and game design style. I wouldn't recommend paying full price, but when it's on sale, I think it's worth every penny.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Kushina
( 6.8 hrs on record )
Posted: June 29
Nice game. After fixing some bugs much better. I like it. I loved Neverhood, I like Armikrog. :)
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Interswanky
( 3.5 hrs on record )
Posted: June 26
Not as bad as I had heard, and I hope they will one day be able to make another game like this but better due to my love of the first game, but with only 3-4 hours of play time needed to beat it (I was taking my sweet time with this game too btw) its hard to justify its normal asking price. Would only reccomend buying it if you really like the style and it's on sale, and in hopes to help fund another game that can potentially be better. I don't want to compare it to the neverhood because it's a different game on its own but with it being tied so closely with its art style, game play, and similar puzzles I feel as though I can't help but do so.

There seems to be an overall lack of immersion like there was in the neverhood, which may be due to the neverhood having the strength of the silent protagonist, and there is also the lack of sense of wonder of exploration, where in Armikrog you feel like there is only a predetermined route with few branching paths to choose the order in which you can tackle the various challenges as you go mostly from one room to the next. Where the Neverhood allowed you to actually explore the world of The Neverhood for large portions in the game in a first person perspective actually allowing you to take in and explore your surroundings at your leisure.

As for the story, while given an interesting intro and backstory to your character, the rest of the story feels kind of shoe horned in, especially with the introduction of the villain seeming evil for evil's sake with little forshadowing in cutscenes where these octopus things speak to you in a language you can't understand until the very end of the game, even then the story they tell you isn't really vital and forces you to go out of your way to loop through all of Arkikrog to finally understand what they are telling you, if at the end you even care. Whereas in The Neverhood (again, I wish i din't feel the need to compare the two) the story grew organically as you literally know nothing of the world you are in, but you slowly see the influences and actions of the villain throughout the game and grow a sense of an omnipotent danger ever lurking long before you even see a glimpse of the villain.

As for the puzzles, they tend to repeat themselves with very little growth in challenge or complexity, or the few that do arn't (at least in my opinion) very fun. The ones you need to complete to access a new area in the game with the turn wheel is what comes to mind. That being said there where a few I did find fun and inginuitive, but they were few and far between. I guess my biggest gripe with the puzzles is that they didn't really seem to grow on top of eachother that well and felt more like things I had to do over and over again as opposed to what The Neverhood had done which I felt had puzzles that grew on eachother and were more intricately connected. Kind of like if you were to compare map designs of Dark Souls 1 with the map design of Dark Souls 2 for those who haven't played The Neverhood or Armikrog.

The animating at some points were a bit choppy as some points, several moments in the last cutscene of the game especially seemed cheaply done while at the same time had several moments that were done really well which only upsets me more because it shows they could have done a better quality job with it. I won't say what moments in this review because I don't want to spoil anything for those who may want to still buy this game and who may enjoy it. Also there are times when your main protagonist and his companion talk to eachother on screen or jump give slight compliments to eachother where neither of there mouths move, which I know can be hard to animate with clay animation all the lip movements while your characters could be doing any number of things individually for each line but still come accross as awkward and a blatent flaw that personally would take me out of the game whenever it happened. The last animation error I'd like to address is when sometimes you are pushing this orange and yellow square shapped creature to use as a platform, your characters arm and partial body he has wrapped around the creature can be seen through the creature as you are pushing it, which again since you have to do this several times for several of the same similar puzzles you would think would have been fixed during the playtesting phase.

With everything having been said, it's a cute game and I'm happy several of the origional team members of The Neverhood (the first game I was ever bought as a child that got me into gaming that I have reccomended to people my entire life and still pop the disk into my computer to this day) got together to work on a new project even if they dropped the ball. I have to also admit that due to my everlasting nestalgia boner for their first title, I may be too biased in the comparison of the two games, but I still hope that this team will one day make another game like The Neverhood and Armikrog and learn from their mistakes to bring us future content, even if it never lives up to the high pedistal I've placed The Neverhood on.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Skel1
( 1.3 hrs on record )
Posted: June 26
Unplayable buggy mess. Such a shame, the art work is really top notch, but just an hour in I've had to restart it multiple times. The system Cursor obscures the game cursor on ubuntu. My character has gotten stuck walking. One puzzle screen started registering clicks wrong, escape menu stopped working, and I had to alt tab out to kill the program.

The art work and claymation is really, really cool looking. I'm going to try to stomach the bugs to see more of it, but make no mistake, all of the negative reviews about bugs and playability issues aren't hyperbole.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Most Helpful Reviews  In the past 30 days
4 of 5 people (80%) found this review helpful
Recommended
3.8 hrs on record
Posted: June 30
This game gets a bad rap. Feels pretty much just like The Neverhood, only perhaps a little bit less slapstick/silly. Same style of puzzles, gameplay, and story. A little disappointed by the music, as it's more ambient and less goofy than in the past, but perhaps Terry Taylor isn't as wild in his old age. Regardless, it was still a nice revisit to Doug TenNapel's art and game design style. I wouldn't recommend paying full price, but when it's on sale, I think it's worth every penny.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
4 of 5 people (80%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
3.5 hrs on record
Posted: June 26
Not as bad as I had heard, and I hope they will one day be able to make another game like this but better due to my love of the first game, but with only 3-4 hours of play time needed to beat it (I was taking my sweet time with this game too btw) its hard to justify its normal asking price. Would only reccomend buying it if you really like the style and it's on sale, and in hopes to help fund another game that can potentially be better. I don't want to compare it to the neverhood because it's a different game on its own but with it being tied so closely with its art style, game play, and similar puzzles I feel as though I can't help but do so.

There seems to be an overall lack of immersion like there was in the neverhood, which may be due to the neverhood having the strength of the silent protagonist, and there is also the lack of sense of wonder of exploration, where in Armikrog you feel like there is only a predetermined route with few branching paths to choose the order in which you can tackle the various challenges as you go mostly from one room to the next. Where the Neverhood allowed you to actually explore the world of The Neverhood for large portions in the game in a first person perspective actually allowing you to take in and explore your surroundings at your leisure.

As for the story, while given an interesting intro and backstory to your character, the rest of the story feels kind of shoe horned in, especially with the introduction of the villain seeming evil for evil's sake with little forshadowing in cutscenes where these octopus things speak to you in a language you can't understand until the very end of the game, even then the story they tell you isn't really vital and forces you to go out of your way to loop through all of Arkikrog to finally understand what they are telling you, if at the end you even care. Whereas in The Neverhood (again, I wish i din't feel the need to compare the two) the story grew organically as you literally know nothing of the world you are in, but you slowly see the influences and actions of the villain throughout the game and grow a sense of an omnipotent danger ever lurking long before you even see a glimpse of the villain.

As for the puzzles, they tend to repeat themselves with very little growth in challenge or complexity, or the few that do arn't (at least in my opinion) very fun. The ones you need to complete to access a new area in the game with the turn wheel is what comes to mind. That being said there where a few I did find fun and inginuitive, but they were few and far between. I guess my biggest gripe with the puzzles is that they didn't really seem to grow on top of eachother that well and felt more like things I had to do over and over again as opposed to what The Neverhood had done which I felt had puzzles that grew on eachother and were more intricately connected. Kind of like if you were to compare map designs of Dark Souls 1 with the map design of Dark Souls 2 for those who haven't played The Neverhood or Armikrog.

The animating at some points were a bit choppy as some points, several moments in the last cutscene of the game especially seemed cheaply done while at the same time had several moments that were done really well which only upsets me more because it shows they could have done a better quality job with it. I won't say what moments in this review because I don't want to spoil anything for those who may want to still buy this game and who may enjoy it. Also there are times when your main protagonist and his companion talk to eachother on screen or jump give slight compliments to eachother where neither of there mouths move, which I know can be hard to animate with clay animation all the lip movements while your characters could be doing any number of things individually for each line but still come accross as awkward and a blatent flaw that personally would take me out of the game whenever it happened. The last animation error I'd like to address is when sometimes you are pushing this orange and yellow square shapped creature to use as a platform, your characters arm and partial body he has wrapped around the creature can be seen through the creature as you are pushing it, which again since you have to do this several times for several of the same similar puzzles you would think would have been fixed during the playtesting phase.

With everything having been said, it's a cute game and I'm happy several of the origional team members of The Neverhood (the first game I was ever bought as a child that got me into gaming that I have reccomended to people my entire life and still pop the disk into my computer to this day) got together to work on a new project even if they dropped the ball. I have to also admit that due to my everlasting nestalgia boner for their first title, I may be too biased in the comparison of the two games, but I still hope that this team will one day make another game like The Neverhood and Armikrog and learn from their mistakes to bring us future content, even if it never lives up to the high pedistal I've placed The Neverhood on.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
3 of 4 people (75%) found this review helpful
Recommended
5.0 hrs on record
Posted: June 26
Yes, it has tons of bugs but i love it as i loved The Neverhood
+ best soundtrack in point and click game ever.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
4.0 hrs on record
Posted: July 16
This game was a huge disappointment for me. I may have set my hopes up much too high. However, this is not at all a bad game, but one that didn't live up to the standards that Doug TenNapel set when creating both Earthworm Jim and The Neverhood. I loved The Neverhood and in fact just beat it a month before learning that this game was being released. So naturally I preordered Armikrog and the Sound Track (which was phenomenal as expected).

The Good

  • The music was by far my favorite part of the entire game. Terry Scott Taylor's rambling vocals and the odd instrumentation help to give this game even more quirk than it already has.
  • The visuals of the game are beautiful--possibly even more so than that of The Neverhood. The mixture of clay (or plastic that is formed to look like clay), paper, and other craft objects is an art style that has never been pulled off quite as well as Doug TenNapel's projects have.
  • The cut scenes, which were often humorous (to an extent) were reminiscent of The Neverhood at times.
  • Of course, a good point and click game would not be complete without some good puzzles. They were quite a bit easier than that of The Neverhood.
  • The addition of a second character in a Donkey Kong Country-style fashion definitely added another dimension to the gameplay.

The Bad

  • The crying baby mini game felt monotonous. This was the only puzzle that threw me off at first. When I finally figured it out, it just became irritating to have to do several other times.
  • The ending was very anticlimactic. Compared to the The Neverhood, which had both a good and bad ending, the ending for this game was much too simple and boring. Vognaut was not a menacing villain like Klogg was. There was no buildup to his arrival and I wish that the story behind the three astronauts was explored much more.
  • The length of the game was a major issue for me. While The Neverhood takes between 6 and 10 hours to complete on average (took me 8 hours), Armikrog suffered in length. It took me between 3 and 4 hours to beat. However, this could be because the game had much less backtracking and scavenger hunting. That can be viewed as a good or bad thing.
  • Most of the puzzles felt too damn easy. The ones that were difficult on the other hand, were too damn difficult out of nowhere.
  • The characters never talk to one another during gameplay. It feels silent and awkward. Much of the cutscene dialogue feels forced.

OVERALL
Give the game a chance. I can't say it's not worth a shot. Wait for it to go on sale though.

If you have never played The Neverhood, you are in for a treat. If you are only here for nostalgia, this game will definitely fuel it. But if you're expecting something close to a Neverhood 2, you will be a bit disappointed.

(Sidenote, I missed the first-person views but I think that probably would've extended the amount of time it took to create by even more. I also would've liked to see a spaceship level or something along the lines.)
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
2 of 3 people (67%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
1.3 hrs on record
Posted: June 26
Unplayable buggy mess. Such a shame, the art work is really top notch, but just an hour in I've had to restart it multiple times. The system Cursor obscures the game cursor on ubuntu. My character has gotten stuck walking. One puzzle screen started registering clicks wrong, escape menu stopped working, and I had to alt tab out to kill the program.

The art work and claymation is really, really cool looking. I'm going to try to stomach the bugs to see more of it, but make no mistake, all of the negative reviews about bugs and playability issues aren't hyperbole.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
3 of 5 people (60%) found this review helpful
Recommended
8.1 hrs on record
Posted: June 25
If you have played Neverhood and Skullmonekys you will love this game. The claymation is gorgeous!
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
1 of 2 people (50%) found this review helpful
Recommended
3.7 hrs on record
Posted: July 3
As much as I appreciate that they made a sequel I must say that it was to short. However it gave me this small comeback to my childhood when I played Neverhood! Thanks!
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
1 of 2 people (50%) found this review helpful
Recommended
3.0 hrs on record
Posted: July 6
While relatively short, this game is decent. If you don't mind the claymation style, which I think has a sort of charm. As for anyone and everyone expecting this to be some sort of grand masterpiece, IT'S AN OLD-SCHOOL POINT-AND-CLICK. Not everything can be Monkey Island. To those that panned the game, did you ever play all the old puzzle P&C's before? It's an older genre, maybe it hasn't aged the best, but this is it. Myst, The Day The World Broke, all the old titles that used very limited animated elements on a static set. It's done by the people who did The Neverhood, and that game came out in 1996. This wasn't supposed to be innovative, or amazing, or the next CoD, it's nostalgic. Pure and simple reminiscing. The tech may have gotten better, but they went with the old formula with new tools, by choice.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
1 of 2 people (50%) found this review helpful
Recommended
6.3 hrs on record
Posted: July 4
Armikrog is a great game. Interesting puzzles, funny sceenes and good soundtrack.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
1 of 2 people (50%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
Recommended
3.9 hrs on record
Posted: July 3
I'm honestly not sure about how I feel about Armikrog. On one hand, it perfectly captures the feel, style and quality of the neverhood, but on the other, I felt wanting. The game was very short, full of glitches and kinda ham-handidly handled its ending. But at the same time I'm compelled to recomend it, warts and all to anyone who enjoys old style adventure games.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny