On a distant edge of an unknown planet, an abandoned structure sits in silence. Constructed by an unmanned research vessel sent from Earth, the Lun Infinus station was designed to run simulations for a five year period, exploring possibilities of human colonization in the case that Earth became uninhabitable.
User reviews: Very Positive (298 reviews)
Release Date: May 5, 2014

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Reviews

“This game has multiple genres, an '80s sci-fi flick art style, and a coffee pot”
Gamespot

“The Desolate Hope, isn't great just because of its stunning artwork, its gripping sci-fi story, and its coffee pot protagonist. It also packs a triple punch with three distinct gameplay types, each skillfully woven together.”
Indiegames.com

“From a gameplay point of view The Desolate Hope mixes platforming with overhead adventure segments and semi turn-based battles. This is already intriguing, but I'm more impressed by its stunning visual style.”
mtv.com

About This Game

On a distant edge of an unknown planet, an abandoned structure sits in silence. Constructed by an unmanned research vessel sent from Earth, the Lun Infinus station was designed to run simulations for a five year period, exploring possibilities of human colonization in the case that Earth became uninhabitable. Developed during an age of ambition and wealth, the project was quickly abandoned when interest faded in the following years.

The last transmission from Earth occurred more than thirty years ago. The Lun Infinus station contained five sentient computers, Derelicts, built with certain levels of mobility in the case of emergency or need for relocation. Each of these Derelicts was to formulate their own plan for colonization based on thousands of hours of simulations. Given the amount of time that has passed however, the simulations have become very elaborate and bizarre. Meanwhile however, a mysterious computer virus has emerged. The virus of unknown origins has been slowly ravaging the Derelicts. Because of this, more and more CPU processing power has been needed for anti-virus measures, leaving less power for the simulations. Coffee is the last mobile resident of the station, a small service robot who spends his days keeping the station and the Derelicts operational as they perform their daily tasks. Since CPU power is slim, Coffee has been cutting corners to find ways around the virus. By using small subsystems and less vital CPU's scattered through the station in lesser devices, Coffee has designed a line of digital helpers, each simply called a D-Co, or "Digital Counterpart", to assist him in fighting the virus and keeping the station operational. Eventually the virus gets the best of each D-Co, and Coffee tries to create an improved D-Co using a different CPU. The latest is D-Co 9, built using the code of a simple computer game. Coffee dedicates his own CPU to be used for the main simulations, putting D-Co in charge of moving his body throughout the station, taking care of the needs of the Derelicts, and fighting off virus attacks when they occur.

GAMEPLAY:
The Desolate Hope mixes several gameplay styles. On the station and in the simulations, the game is a platformer. You will shoot enemies, collect powerups and bits (money) and upgrade yourself and your virtual battlers. When you enter a mini-simulation (the old arcade style screens) then the game becomes an 8-bit overhead dungeon crawler. There you can farm money and gain options to customize your battle experiences. When you encounter a virus boss, the game shifts to a JRPG style battle where you must use the mouse to select from your various options to defeat your opponent. Almost everything outside of these battles is aimed at upgrading your abilities and increasing your stats for these fights, they are the real challenge of the game.

"The Desolate Hope, isn't great just because of its stunning artwork, its gripping sci-fi story, and its coffee pot protagonist. It also packs a triple punch with three distinct gameplay types, each skillfully woven together. The side scrolling action has different platforming elements for each section, the overhead adventure distills fun elements of a classic Zelda (including walls you can walk through or destroy) and the turn-based, RPG-style boss battles are visually mesmerizing and tough." -IndieGames.com

"From a gameplay point of view The Desolate Hope mixes platforming with overhead adventure segments and semi turn-based battles. This is already intriguing, but I'm more impressed by its stunning visual style." -mtv.com

"The Desolate Hope is developed by Scott Games and upon booting it up, you will notice the great artwork the game uses. It combines three gameplay genres, side scrolling, overhead adventure and a turn-based RPG styled battles. It might sound like a messy mash up but the game is able to pull it off without a hitch and gamers are in for a unique experience. Offering hours of gameplay, a unique leveling system and a day-and-night cycle." -TheBitBag.com

"The Desolate Hope constantly plays with the very idea of playing a video game. Unlike many modern games, it is hyper-aware of its gameness. There are games inside of games, simulations inside of simulations, mini-games inside of boss fights. And the fact that you’re playing as an AI that developed from a computer game is a very hard wink at the exhaustive level of metagaming that’s going on." -GamesThatExist.com

"There are plenty of hours of gameplay, a nonlinear path allowing for exploration, and detailed art design. Now you can't beat that..."
-GameSpot.com

"I very much enjoy a lot about this game; it’s takes on platforming, dungeon-crawling, and RPGs is unique and well mixed together so that one type of play benefits the other. It also has some incredible visuals, with very detailed character designs and a classic cyberpunk attitude, but not also without a bit of whimsy as well (one derelict has given up on his mission, becoming a toymaker and has begun recreating his simulation with child-like automatons)." -GamingSymmetry.com

"So after encountering this on Rock Paper Shotgun, I was ready to declare my indie game of the year. Because any game made rock solid out of derelict, insane robots just makes my not-so-inner geek squeal. How insane are the robots? Each is actively running a matrix like test bed, and.... Well, one was building a mining simulator, decided that was too depressing, and started making toys. Another is trying to capture the artistic essence of the soul, but cant seem to make anything run for more than five seconds. The next is attempting to rebuild humanity out of two tissue samples. Then there's the one still running straight, he seems curiously nice... And the last one's dead and frozen. But still drawing power...Then there's the coffee pot. Which is you. Sort of. And hey, bonus! You've got fifteen days to live, and you're the ninth attempt at straightening things out. Good luck!" -an enthusiastic fan

System Requirements

    Minimum:
    • OS: XP, Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8
    • Processor: 2 GHz Intel Pentium 4 or AMD Athlon or equivalent
    • Memory: 1 GB RAM
    • Graphics: 1 GB
    • Hard Drive: 1 GB available space
Helpful customer reviews
201 of 209 people (96%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
14.5 hrs on record
Posted: May 9
Paid for this game a week before it became free... no regrets...
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42 of 45 people (93%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
20.6 hrs on record
Posted: April 12
Yes, Freddy. You're good at what you do and you have an enormous fan-following. But I think I'm gonna step aside for a sec and admire Scott's lesser appreciated work, and a game which has quickly become one of my favourite games of all time.

Sadly, I cannot remember if I came across this game by browsing "Games under £4" or if I only heard about it through Five Nights at Freddy's. But I'm so glad I found this game either way.

So what's the thingy happening, then? Well, you play as the re-programmed CPU of a video game controlling the body of a feisty coffee-pot with legs. You're stranded in a space station an unknown distance from Earth with 4 (once 5) super-computer robots who are trying to find a way to perfectly colonize distant planets for humans. Viruses are starting to take their toll on the simulations and the space station is on it's last shred of power, so it's up to you (and the AI of the coffee-pot) to gather as much resources as you can to take out the viruses before they ruin the mission.
Just like FNaF, this is a really original concept.

The gameplay is broken up into several segments, all being from different genres of games, and you're constantly under a time limit; something you don't see in a lot of games. It's very reminiscent of Majora's Mask, in a way. This kind of gameplay mechanic would work in so many games which ignore it, like all the games where a big event is about to happen, but you could do a lap of the world before it even begins.

Some may argue that the gameplay gets very repetitive after a short while, and I'll admit there are a few places that get rather tedious, but fortunately it's much more engaging than FNaF. Also, just like FNaF, it's feels amazing to beat the game because of how much work goes into it.

And as for Scott's signature art-style, this game is gorgeous! Scott captures the creativity, the vision and the desires of the Derelicts perfectly in their simulations. And as for the space station and surrounding area, it's awe-inspiring how lonely it feels. Don't even get me started on how good the soundtrack is.

You get all this, and a ton of depth and story, for just £3.99. It's a longer game than the Freddy Trilogy as a whole, and it's perfect for what it's trying to acomplish. I just finished this game clocking in 7 hours of gameplay and I can't wait to play it again. Tenaouttaten
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16 of 17 people (94%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
4.0 hrs on record
Posted: March 5
Platforming sections are okay but the game really shines in the batshit crazy boss fights. Recommend picking it up just for the crazy fun boss fights.
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18 of 28 people (64%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
0.2 hrs on record
Posted: May 7
I forgot how to attack
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6 of 6 people (100%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
7.7 hrs on record
Posted: May 17
Essentially two games in one, The Desolate Hope combines familiar gameplay elements from vastly different genres to create something greater than the whole of its parts. While clunky at times, it feels refreshingly creative despite doing little new.

Normal levels play out like a simple sidescrolling platformer where you collect resources and unlock & upgrade abilities. Every map has one boss that you have to beat four times; although it sounds tedious, they mix things up by moving the boss entrance around the map and drastically increasing the difficulty of boss tiers (which essentially forcing you to play through other levels and then backtrack). This helps breaks up the flow and promotes exploration, instead of just steamrolling through the maps one at a time.

The bosses that you are preparing for during the platforming segments are the crux of the gameplay; it is really refreshing to look forward to a boss battle in a western game. These play out like JRPG battles, with your party of AIs on the right throwing their "spells" at the boss on the left. It took me a while to get used to it because its very fast and click-happy, with bosses often acting faster than your whole party can. Eventually the combat gets so fast that you have to use special abilities to automate certain functions (trying to avoid spoilers here!). Herein lies my biggest complaint because once the combat gets truly challenging and gives you all your tools & toys, the game just plays itself.

While I really enjoyed this game, I don't see it getting a sequel anytime soon considering how it ends. Hopefully once the devs are done milking FNAF we will get a spiritual successor because The Desolate Hope is a very creative and colorful take on a futuristic apocalypse.
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