Glitchspace, currently in alpha, is a first person programming game that's centred around a visual programming mechanic. Set in a cyberspace world, you are trying to find a place known as Glitchspace - a by-product of cyberspace and its various glitches.
User reviews: Very Positive (118 reviews)
Release Date: Jan 31, 2014

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Early Access Game

Get instant access and start playing; get involved with this game as it develops.

Note: This Early Access game is not complete and may or may not change further. If you are not excited to play this game in its current state, then you should wait to see if the game progresses further in development. Learn more

What the developers have to say:

Why Early Access?

“Early access has given us the ability to make a game alongside a community that cares. The feedback is immeasurable, and of course sales help to pay for the development of the game, all of which we self funded through our bank overdrafts for the first few months.”

Approximately how long will this game be in Early Access?

“The full game will be released in 2015.”

How is the full version planned to differ from the Early Access version?

“The full version will feature fully polished content, at least 2 hours of main play through the story mode, and a sandbox allowing you to play around with the programming mechanic as you please.”

What is the current state of the Early Access version?

“Currently the game offers up to an hour of main play, and some polish. We try our best to make sure the game is as bug free (outwith the obvious glitching) with every update.”

Will the game be priced differently during and after Early Access?

“Our pricing increases as we move through the updates.”

How are you planning on involving the Community in your development process?

“The community is involved, and we discuss all of the points and suggestions raised on the steam community hub, emails, and even in the reviews.”
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Recommended By Curators

"Programming platformer. Unfortunately not much content yet, but highly recommended for the concept if you can grab it for cheap."

Recent updates View all (27)

July 2

Dev Blog 19 -

Available here

Hey folks! Kayleigh here!

I thought I'd give you lovely people a wee sneak peek at some of the aesthetic work I've been doing for 2.0. I hope you folk like lots of pictures and screenshots pictures, if not you're in for a bumpy ride!

Alright, initially this level was very closed in and compact, this worked as it being one of the initial levels you play through but I felt that the pacing was a smidge off and as such basically expanded the whole thing. I tried to break the level up with a few more manageable sections which more intervals between puzzles, allowing the players to view the environment and brace themselves for the next puzzle. Although as this is one of the initial levels I wanted to keep it fairly simple and not overwhelm the player with lots of platforming sections, especially as this is an aspect that, during playtesting, a lot of people struggled with. The main struggle was finding a balance between platforming and bridged sections so that it wasn't boring.

The other levels aesthetics have gone with a very distinct theme and this level is no different, although for I have opted for a cleaner and simpler overall visual aesthetic. Taking a lot of inspiration from more modern architecture designs. I kept the decorative trim fairly simple with a few key features in the level for added interest. These key features helped give additional interest to sections where there was less puzzles or platforms.



As this is a rather dark level I took this opportunity to play with light wherever I could, in particular using the main level light and level geometry.





Sometimes playing with the geometry just didn't work and areas were consistently stripped back and redone such as the section below. This is one of the reasons this was such a big workload for me as it was important that we were able to finalise on something that felt right with the rest of the game and we wanted to get it right.



On top of this I've also been working towards designing the lights for the game (random spot lights with no apparent source wasn't the greatest look).
The lights went through many iterations till we decided on something that worked well.



The strip light look worked nicely for some aspects of the levels but it ran the risk of looking too clichéd sci-fi so had to be used sparingly if at all. They also didn't quite have the same effect of light as the others did and left rooms still rather dull, which was undesirable.



This was a more accidental modern look that left our level looking more like a hotel hallway than the abstract and mysterious world we're used to! So naturally, these lights were scrapped.

Finally we moved more towards the sunken floor lights. Now these take some tweaking but overall they don't get in the way by cluttering up the level and manage to give out a good amount of light so that you're not lost in a sea of purple gloom.



Although we've settled on these lights for now we will probably be expanding on our array of various light sources, to keep things interesting. Lemmie know what you folk think!

That's me for this weeks folks, I hope you enjoyed my tale of aesthetics and lights. Till next time,

-Kayleigh.

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June 18

Dev Blog 18 - Environmental Themes

Available here

Hi Guys, Graham here.

I've been part of the Space Budgie team now for just under one month and what a crazy month its been! Getting up to speed with a product mid development can be an exhausting task. I must have played through Glitchspace almost a dozen times in my first week alone.

My specialty is in level design, however with almost all of the design for 2.0 nailed down and solidified, small tweaks here and there were all that was needed. Attention has instead been directed towards the aesthetics of the levels; audio, detail, lighting - all the fun parts of level design that you have to resist doing until sufficient testing and iteration has been done.

Whilst detailing the levels, it was suggested that each level could have a “theme” to help create a little variation in the environment (because let's face it; Regardless of how engaging the puzzles are, staring at the same arrangement of blue colored blocks for hours might get a little fatiguing). With this in mind, we've started experimenting with various themes for each of the levels. Numerous play testers had made comments in the past on the Aztec vibe they received from the Collisions level, and through some experimentation, a Gothic theme emerged for Forces. This opens up the opportunity to create narrative set pieces to build around the puzzles that are memorable to the player. Whilst I've been darting back and forth between various levels, (and even prototyping some brand new stuff!) most of my focus has been on the Forces level and one such set piece that has emerged is what I've grown to call “The Courtyard”.



Its built up around the first three puzzles the player encounters in Forces and resembles a manor garden (water feature and all! – sorry I get a little excited over the water feature). Whilst building it up, I found myself subconsciously making up a narrative ; “what would people have done in this section?”, “where would this staircase have led?”, “why is there a nice water feature inside?!” We want to imply a narrative in these environments, to immerse the player into the world and let their imagination run.



That's all for this week, best be getting back to work!

2 comments Read more
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Reviews

“Glitchspace could become one of the more inventive puzzle games to arrive on the PC in some time.”
Gamespot

“Even with other programming-based puzzlers on the horizon Glitchspace still looks unique, bewildering and promising.”
Eurogamer

“As someone with the programming knowledge of a log this is immediately challenging stuff, even if at first you can only make very minor changes. But then, it’s all the more satisfying to make a platform bouncy when it wasn’t before.”
Rock, Paper, Shotgun

About This Game



Glitchspace (currently in early access), is a first person puzzle platformer that's centred around a visual programming mechanic. Stretch and scale objects to make a bridge, apply a force to objects, bouncing you up to high places, use your programming gun to fire code at objects, changing their physical properties in the game world!

Set in a VR cyberspace world, you are trying to find a place known as Glitchspace - a by-product of cyberspace and its various glitches. A world that would allow for infinite possibilities, and access across all systems in cyberspace through exploitation.

Through problem solving, it's up to you how you approach the in-game challenges; find glitches in the cyberspace world, and exploit them in various different ways, allowing for a emergent play experience.

Programming And Gameplay

We created a node-based programming system for Glitchspace, called Null. Null allows for chunks of functionality to be applied to objects with ease, and makes the programming a visual, dynamic, and instantaneous feature.

Objects in Glitchspace are either programmable, or non-programmable. You can make an object programmable through decryption using a decrypter, and similarly you can make it non-programmable through encryption using an encrypter.

For each programmable object, a canvas can be brought up, and function nodes can be added to it upon the canvas. These function nodes have input and output connections, and can be connected to each other to create functional code that does something to the object, to another object it references, or to totally new objects it creates!

Here are some example programs you could make:
  • Apply a force to an object, moving it out of the way.
  • Scale an object down to make it the correct height for jumping on.
  • Duplicate and move an object to create stairs, or floating platforms.
  • Make an object have no collisions to pass through it.
  • Change the physical properties of an object.
  • Make an object move when you touch another object.
  • Replicate the functionality of the Portal, and Gravity gun.

Objects that are decrypted will have a default program applied, and a specific set of function nodes for you to edit the program. This will depend upon the decrypter used.

In the sandbox mode, all functions are available to you, allowing you to play around with all that is possible!

**Rift DK1 & DK2 Supported

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
SteamOS + Linux
    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows XP. Vista, 7, 8.
    • Processor: 1.0Ghz Dual Core
    • Memory: 250 MB RAM
    • Graphics: 512MB Video Card, Shader Model 3.0
    • DirectX: Version 9.0c
    • Hard Drive: 150 MB available space
    Recommended:
    • OS: Windows XP. Vista, 7, 8.
    • Processor: 2.0Ghz Dual Core or greater
    • Memory: 500 MB RAM
    • Graphics: 512MB Video Card, Shader Model 3.0 or greater
    • DirectX: Version 9.0c
    • Hard Drive: 150 MB available space
    Minimum:
    • OS: An Intel-based Mac running Mac OS X 10.6
    • Processor: 1.0Ghz Dual Core
    • Memory: 250 MB RAM
    • Graphics: 512MB Video Card, Shader Model 3.0
    • Hard Drive: 150 MB available space
    Recommended:
    • OS: An Intel-based Mac running Mac OS X 10.6
    • Processor: 2.0Ghz Dual Core or greater
    • Memory: 500 MB RAM
    • Graphics: 512MB Video Card, Shader Model 3.0 or greater
    • Hard Drive: 150 MB available space
    Minimum:
    • OS: A Debian based Linux distro
    • Processor: 1.0Ghz Dual Core
    • Memory: 250 MB RAM
    • Graphics: 512MB Video Card, Shader Model 3.0
    • Hard Drive: 150 MB available space
    Recommended:
    • OS: A Debian based Linux distro
    • Processor: 2.0Ghz Dual Core or greater
    • Memory: 500 MB RAM
    • Graphics: 512MB Video Card, Shader Model 3.0 or greater
    • Hard Drive: 150 MB available space
Helpful customer reviews
1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
1.0 hrs on record
Posted: June 8
Early Access Review
Very nice game. It is frustrating that it stops when things are getting very interesting, but it's early access.
The gameplay is very nice and full of promesses. For 10$, it is worth buying it now and enjoy the final release this year.
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7 of 7 people (100%) found this review helpful
6.0 hrs on record
Posted: February 6
Early Access Review
Well... This is a difficult game to review. I have very mixed feelings about it. The concept is very good, and the game was very well thought out and put together. The problem is, it's not finished. If they ever finish it it has the potential to be a very popular game, but as it is they haven't put out a new update in a LOOONG time. As it is it's still in beta. So if this game goes on sale for like 7 bucks or less, I'd say get it. But at the full price, it's not worth it.
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10 of 13 people (77%) found this review helpful
1.0 hrs on record
Posted: May 9
Early Access Review
It is like playing portal with just the blue portal. The game has a lot of potential but very little content and it stops just as it starts getting interesting.

The programming aspect is very basic, mostly just setting the size and location of blocks. Once you understand how the system works all the puzzles are trivial.

I'll keep an eye on this one hoping the devolepers make a great game out of this but I would not recommend anyone to buy it in its current state.
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4 of 4 people (100%) found this review helpful
6.8 hrs on record
Posted: April 2
Early Access Review
This game is great fun to play and with it's non violent type theme, it could be a great game to teach teens like me how to learn the idea of code. It's not like it acually teaches you the language of code but it teaches you how code works like collision, booleans and more. you will not learn real code in this, just give you a basic mind set of it.

The game is good. Nice pase, intresting challenges and a unique to other games. The only game off the top of my head I could relate this to is portal as becuase of it's first person puzzle style, but the puzzles given are just nothing I have seen in another game before. But I have not really looked into that many programming games so how should I know.

I have not got a VR headset currently so I was not able to test the VR but in my expeience with VR, it would be a great thing to include.

However you should take not this game IS STILL IN EARLY ACCESS. If you want this game to become a reality then go ahead and fund it, It's fun and worth it, if it becomes a full release that is. Since it is in early access, there is bugs, Plenty of bugs. I have in this current update had a few crashes to the point that I gave up playing.

"The game crashed.
The crash report folder named "2015-04-02_122406" next to game executable."
/\ error code /\

So overall good game, but it needs to be one of the few games to acually escape early access and become bug free (or at most, 2 bugs)

Keep going Space budgie, I believe in you!!!
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59 of 64 people (92%) found this review helpful
1.2 hrs on record
Posted: April 24, 2014
Early Access Review
I just finished playing the games short story mode/tutorial. It is a Alpha game so I did not expect something long and complex. I would say it is a very interesting puzzle platformer. If it had more content, which it will hopefully have upon its full release. I would also say that it might come close to Antichamber and Portal.

The gameplay and the puzzle solving is really intuitive (Okay maybe that is just because I do know how to programm). In the tutorial section you were pretty much just guided through the levels because you didn't have all the commands available so it was pretty easy but I can see it getting really interesting when you actually have all commands at your fingertips.

The soundtrack is okay. It is nothing special but it is not bad either. Just somewhere inbetween.

The Movement is okayish but I would say it needs a litle bit more work because jumping doesn't feel right. But I can't really put my finger on why it doesn't feel right.

I think a great addition would be workshop support and a level editor because if a game like this has these features it will never get old because there is always new stuff to download or to creat. I also think maybe creating your own more complex commands would be great but so far I think the game has all necessary commands you need to have fun with it.

I suggest you buy it now to support the devs so we can get more features. I will also EDIT this review when the final Product is released.

Edit 1: Jumping now feels good and not clunky anymore.
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