Something ancient and evil is stirring in Victorian England. Only you can stop it. Journey to the brink of madness and beyond as you set forth alone into the dark.
User reviews: Very Positive (340 reviews)
Release Date: May 20, 2014

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Buy The Last Door - Season One

 

Recommended By Curators

"it comes down to whether or not you consider the small, extra bits of content and the improved visuals and sound worthy of $10."
Read the full review here.

Recent updates View all (5)

July 21

Beta of Season Two: Episode Three - "The Reunion" now available at thelastdoor.com

Beta release of the 7th Episode!

Be among the first ones to check out "The Reunion", the much anticipated 7th episode of 'The Last Door' series!

At The Game Kitchen we're very proud of this new episode, but the job is far from done! Now you can play and tell us what need to be changed in order to achieve the best possible episode! Play the beta, discuss new features and enhancements with us and other players in forums, and embrace the experience of crafting a superb new instalment in the series together!

Participate in "The Reunion" beta
What's so special about 'The Last Door' betas?

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June 22

Calling all creatives: Assets released under Creative Commons!

Hi 'TLD' fans!

The awesome community around this title has given us so much that is only fair that we give some love back!

So, we've decided to release all graphical assets (as in 'sprites') from The Last Door Season One as Creative Commons Atributtion 4.0

Wait? What??? Exactly! You can download more than 2,500 sprites in PNG format and use then in your own creations! Animated GIFs, decorate your Youtube videos, or even your own games... FlappyDoor I hear? Why not!

Check all the details in our blog post.

We're really looking forward to see what you guys can come up with ;)

cheers!

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Reviews

“A love letter to H.P. Lovecraft.”
Penny Arcade

“Off to a promisingly frightening start.”
Gamespot

“I experienced genuine chills.”
Joystiq

Steam Greenlight

About This Game

Feel what it's truly like to be alone in the dark with this low-res, high-suspense point-and-click horror adventure, winner of multiple Best Games of the Year awards. Set in Victorian England, when Jeremiah Devitt receives a letter from his old schoolmate Anthony Beechworth with a hidden, cryptic message, he knows something is wrong. His journey to an abandoned manor is only the beginning as he starts to remember a long-buried secret from his youth, discovering things man was not meant to know, and opening doors that should have remained closed…

The Last Door: Collector’s Edition contains four terrifying episodes of occult and otherworldly horror inviting you to investigate Victorian England's deepest, darkest secret. Featuring new scenes and puzzles, enhanced graphics, unlockable bonuses, and remastered sound. Explore ancient manors, decaying tenements, and twisting underground warrens with little but a lamp and magnifying glass to guide you. Dare you open The Last Door: Collector's Edition?

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
SteamOS + Linux
    Minimum:
    • OS: Microsoft Windows XP, Vista, 7, 8
    • Processor: Intel Atom 1.6 GHz
    • Memory: 1 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Integrated with 64 MB RAM
    • Hard Drive: 400 MB available space
    • Additional Notes: Requires Adobe AIR
    Recommended:
    • OS: Microsoft Windows XP, Vista, 7, 8
    • Processor: Dual Core 2.4 GHz
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Dedicated with 128 MB RAM
    • Hard Drive: 400 MB available space
    • Additional Notes: Requires Adobe AIR
    Minimum:
    • OS: OSX Leopard
    • Processor: Intel Atom 1.6 GHz
    • Memory: 1 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Integrated with 64 MB RAM
    • Hard Drive: 400 MB available space
    • Additional Notes: Requires Adobe AIR
    Recommended:
    • OS: OSX Leopard
    • Processor: Dual Core 2.4 GHz
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Dedicated with 128 MB RAM
    • Hard Drive: 400 MB available space
    • Additional Notes: Requires Adobe AIR
    Minimum:
    • OS: Debian based Linux
    • Processor: Intel Atom 1.6 GHz
    • Memory: 1 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Integrated with 64 MB RAM
    • Hard Drive: 400 MB available space
    • Additional Notes: Requires Adobe AIR
    Recommended:
    • OS: Debian based Linux
    • Processor: Dual Core 2.4 GHz
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Dedicated with 128 MB RAM
    • Hard Drive: 400 MB available space
    • Additional Notes: Requires Adobe AIR
Helpful customer reviews
34 of 39 people (87%) found this review helpful
7.3 hrs on record
Posted: May 8
Review: The Last Door

Ever since I was a child I had an interest in horror- or occult-stories, books and movies. I think most of you would agree if I say that’s typical for a young human being that widens its horizon every day but can’t figure out why darkness is so much more uncomfortable yet exciting than daylight. Even now as a grown up I love Lovecraft and Poe, but also modern representatives of this genre, for example Hohlbein, and it still catches me when there is something you try to imagine but you can’t figure out what it looks like. As the famous H.P.Lovecraft said:

“The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown.”

So, enough of an introduction, let’s have a look at the game you came to read about here.

The Last Door is a Point-and-Click Adventure that is set in the 1890s in Victorian England, a time when science was already established but ancient beliefs and a secret organisations such as the freemasons were well known among the people. You get in touch with Jeremiah Devitt, a man in the mid-thirties who received a strange letter from his childhood friend Alexander Beechworth. Not knowing how to deal with this, Jeremiah decides to visit Alexander, unraveling the mysteries about his whereabouts and his family. But that may be only the start for a journey that will lead you to places of Jeremiah’s childhood and past that have been forgotten for some reason. It seems like an ancient evil is making its way back into your life..

I can’t write any further without spoiling but you should already feel how this story will suck you in, not releasing you until finished. A man gets snatched from his everyday life right into a victorian nightmare, how much more lovecraftian could it be? This game relies solely on its mysterious plot and manages this with two main attributes: Sound and Style. When I first saw some screenshots of this game before playing the first Episode “The Letter”, I couldn’t imagine how this pixelated art would manage to give me the creeps or offer details I need to make myself comfortable. But this game did not only manage to revive my passion for retro-styled games, it simply worked out what my introductive quote should show - that fear of the unknown is the strongest one. It feels like the devs from The Game Kitchen simply built a framework from what a scene could look like and relied on the player’s imagination to make it a truly living and frightening place. Colours are not mixed up, no they are shaded differently to create a certain mood like the warmth of a living hall.

Carlos Viola. After listening to “Crows over the City”, which is the main theme of The Last Door, you will likely want to know what the composer’s name is. Don’t thank me for that, thank him for creating this game’s amazing classical music. Every aspect of this game gets pushed by its clever and well written tones and also sound effects, whether its the creeping dark or a simple wave along the old English coast.

Owning a mouse is key for this game since you don’t need any other instruments. You have an inventory at the bottom screen, containing everything you will find and need to interact with other objects. The puzzles are logic-based and really challenging sometimes and it gets tough if you haven’t found the right object yet. This didn’t happen often to me but it might also happen to you so I should mention that. There is no hint system and no button press will highlight any useful items but your cursor will switch from a cross to a lens if you can look, or a hand if you can take or interact with something.

Big Text, Quick Facts:

Pro:
  • Interesting setting of Victorian England
  • Story is heavily influenced by the work of Lovecraft and Poe
  • Pixel Art activates and stimulates the player’s imagination
  • One of the best soundtracks I have ever listened to
  • Puzzles are challenging, some are really unique (just wait for chapter 3 and you’ll see) and also well implemented without letting you feel that this is only a game
  • Well dosed scares mixed with an ubiquitous sense of fear and evil
  • Collector’s Edition contains Bonus Scenes that aren’t available on Game Kitchens Website, providing you with even more background knowledge

Con:
  • Love it or hate it - Pixel Art
  • Puzzles start to get annoying if you can’t find the right object to interact with
  • Paying 9,99 may sound expensive compared to how much you will pay on Game Kitchens website, just for getting the small extra scenes + achievements + Trading-Cards

Summary:

You might have already recognised that I love this game. But besides my own opinion you can’t really go wrong with The Last Door. Its graphics and sound make up for a great journey into a story that even Lovecraft himself would call a masterpiece. If you are not sure about it, enter http://thelastdoor.com and check out the first episode “The Letter” for free. If you liked it, do yourself a favor and enjoy the enhanced textures, sounds and bonus content of the Collector`s Edition on Steam.

This game is nearly perfect in what it tries to be so my rating becomes a 9/10.
(Personal score will always remain 10/10)
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14 of 14 people (100%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
4.3 hrs on record
Posted: April 9
I never thought I'd be scared by a pixel art game, but I was. Very much so.
Buy it if you enjoy great eerie mystery atmosphere, captivating story and well crafted puzzles.

My compliments to the chef!
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5 of 5 people (100%) found this review helpful
5.0 hrs on record
Posted: August 24
The Last Door is a four episode adventure game based on the work of Edgar Allan Poe, but will you want to check it out ?

The Last Door follows on Jeremiah Devitt. When his friend Anthony Beechworth commits suicide, it's up to you to find out what drove him to do such thing. After a while you find out that something evil is lurking right beyond the corner.

Gameplay is really simple point and click adventure style gameplay. You can pick up stuff, combine it and use it to solve puzzles. You also can talk to people and learn some backstory for certain things.

Audio is phenomenal. Everything to the soundtrack and sound effects are just amazing. It adds a lot of atmosphere and tension to some situations.

The pixel art style is really good. I loved to look at the environments just because of the really well crafted pixel art.
It's nothing too groundbreaking but it's still very nice to look at.

The puzzles range from simple to head scratching. I never got stuck but I still needed to take some time to stop and figure out what I was supposed to do, because the game didn't make it clear. For expert Adventure game players it's gonna be pretty easy, but for new comers it's gonna be a bit difficult.

Each episodes give you a different location you can explore ranging from: Gothic London streets, abandoned homes and a hospital for the very ill. Each location has very simple design so you won't get lost no matter what you do. Not to mention all locations have creepy things them, that will creep you out just a bit.

Each episode is really short. It took me 3 hours to finish all 4 episodes, it might take even less time for experienced players. There is also 4 mini episodes that take place after, before and between the four main episodes. Apart from that there's not that much replay value.

I encountered no problems while playing. It ran smooth from start to finish. Even less powerful computers can run this game no problem.

The Last Door is a fantastic adventure game. It was scary and the atmosphere was outstanding. It was worth the full price I paid for it and I can't wait to play Season 2 when it finally comes to steam. I give The Last Door- Collector's Edition an 9/10
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5 of 6 people (83%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
6.2 hrs on record
Posted: June 1
H.P. Lovecraft meets Edgar Allen Poe.

The OST is phenomenal: moody, eloquent, and complex.

Without giving any of the plot away, this is a real gem of story-telling, and ambiance that at times it was easy to forget you were playing a simple point & click. Not everything is obvious though, and at times you have to really consider your options and the route you are taking.

Don't be put off by the Atari-pixelated graphics they didn't take away from the experience, and weirdly in places, seemed to enhance the atmosphere and events that crept up on you as you unraveled the story. This particular edition, is Season One - so is chapter game play that answers enough questions so that it can put new ones in their place. Parts of Season Two are available from the developer website, but as of the time of this review, have not yet hit Steam.
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3 of 3 people (100%) found this review helpful
4.5 hrs on record
Posted: May 19
The Last Door is described as a "journey to the brink of madness" and "a love letter to H.P. Lovecraft". During the introduction the influence was clear and as a big fan of Lovecraft, I was immediately hooked. Fans of Lovecraftian horror should enjoy this point and click title. Despite it not being an actual Lovecraft story, the themes are familiar; helplessness, hopelessness, the fragility or sanity and human vulnerability.

As a big fan of point and click games, I have played surprisingly few horror point and click titles. The Last Door isn't terrifying by any means, but it succeeds in creating a creepy atmosphere through the use of pixel graphics and orchestral music. While the pixel graphics sometimes make things more confusing (objects becoming difficult to spot), the orchestral music is definitely one of the strongest features of the game. I would go as far as to say the score is perfect.

The graphics may not be for everyone, but for others it is probably a plus. The length is spot on, the atmosphere is creepy and the interface is simple and clever. It may not be a game for everyone, but if anything I have written sounds interesting, then you should at least pick up Season One on sale.
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