You are a dead, failed video game character wandering through the recesses of the Random Access Memory, trying to find peace in the final moments of your existence before being deleted forever... ...but forget that. The real story is that Continue?
User reviews: Mixed (135 reviews)
Release Date: Jan 3, 2014
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Reviews

“It probably takes a certain kind of player to really appreciate how cerebral it is, but for those who can, it’s astounding. I have never had a game evoke the thoughts and feelings that Jason Oda pulled out of me in my time with Continue?9876543210.”
A – Gamertell

About This Game

You are a dead, failed video game character wandering through the recesses of the Random Access Memory, trying to find peace in the final moments of your existence before being deleted forever...

...but forget that. The real story is that Continue? is an existential metaphor that explores the finite nature of existence and the beauty and tyranny of our desires within it.

From the developer:

For fans of cerebral games such as Gone Home, The Novelist, and Papers Please.

This is one of those love it or hate it experimental art games. Regardless of whether you like it or not, I ensure you that it is like nothing you've ever played before. It's less about action and strategy and more about taking an emotional and philosophical journey that allows the player to explore his or her own sense of mortality. You will be very, very confused along the way, but your interpretation of this confusion is what the game is all about. I wouldn't recommend it to anyone who is not looking for something very weird and different. Continue? is for the type of person that appreciates odd, poetic word play, interpretation of the abstract, and existential philosophy.

Some games we play to kill time on a long commute, some we play at home to blow off steam after a hard day’s work, and some games are about escaping into a world more magical than our own. Continue? is meant to be played late at night with some wine or weed, when you're feeling quiet and contemplative.

Everything in Continue? has a deeper meaning behind it. All of the strange places you go to, people you talk to, and scenarios you go through are part of a greater idea that I hope you spend a second or two trying to figure out and interpret...or not. You can also just play the damn thing.

What happens to dead video game characters?

In the garbage dump of the Random Access Memory, you travel from town to town, meeting people who offer you their lightning and their prayer. Lightning clears the way for you to move forward and prayer builds shelters in a distant town where you must frequently hide to avoid being deleted into nothingness by the garbage collector. Along the way, you are thrust into many battle challenges, the outcome of which affects your shelters. There is ultimately, no way to escape the garbage collector, but running from it buys you time to think, wander, contemplate, and hopefully be at peace with the inevitability of your deletion.

Each game randomly assigns you 1 of the 6 characters and 6 of the 11 areas. There is no set order to the stages of the game.

Development

Continue? was inspired by existential road trips into nowhere, Peruvian jungle drugs, and a brush with death while lost in the mountains of New Mexico. It is a quest for wonder, contemplation, and peace.

By:

Continue?9876543210 was independently developed by Jason Oda in 2013. Past projects of notoriety include The Perfect Strangers game (nothingsgonnastopmenow.com) and Skrillex Quest (skrillexquest.com).

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
SteamOS + Linux
    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows XP
    • Processor: 2.0 GHz
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: 512 MB of memory
    • Hard Drive: 250 MB available space
    Minimum:
    • OS: Mac OS X 10.5
    • Processor: 2.0 GHz RAM
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: 512 MB of memory
    • Hard Drive: 250 MB available space
    Minimum:
    • OS: Ubuntu Linux 10.10
    • Processor: 2.0 GHz RAM
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: 512 MB of memory
    • Hard Drive: 250 MB available space
Helpful customer reviews
11 of 11 people (100%) found this review helpful
4.3 hrs on record
Posted: September 30
Wow, where do I start with this one?! Ok, Continue? is definitely an acquired taste. It begins with a beautifully drawn-out introduction on the death of a videogame character. Yet, he doesn't want to die. He escapes deletion for a while, and it's your job to keep him alive. While that sounds like an interesting premise for a game, Continue? doesn't stop there. Oh no. You quickly realise that the developer is trying to tell you something, and it soon turns into a reflection on life, on death, on childhood, love, freedom, knowledge and the inevitable. Each scenario that you play through is meant to be a prayer, not necessarily in an overtly religious sense (in fact, the game never comes across as preachy) but more in a sense of inner prayer, inner discovery for who you are, and what the important things in life are. It's not surprising that the developer made this game following a near-death experience. It does make you wonder whether there are better things to be doing with your life than playing a game, but that's beside the point!

Yes, there is a game here, but it's a long, drawn-out game full of interludes and reflection. Let me warn you, if you're not the kind of person who can sit through 5 minute long dreamy interludes, this game is probably not for you. Even the introduction, beautiful though it is, is completely unskippable each and every time you begin a new "life". When you eventually reach the gameplay, you're in a for a shock: it's hectic! You need to dash around looking for characters to speak to. Each will give you a clue, or a cryptic message, or open a door to a building. Getting information and opening doors is essential, because it's here that you can choose to either destroy sections of barriers that impede your exit from the level, or construct more buildings in your sanctuary town (more on that shortly). There's a strict time limit here, and you're also being chased around by chompers (servants of the garbage collector trying to delete you) that will drag you away to mini games if they touch you. Mini games happen every 45 to 60 seconds, and are either 2d riffs on simple arcade games, or 3d exploration / combat games. None last long, yet if you fail you will suffer the consequences! Each failure usually leads to the destruction of buildings in your sanctuary, and this is fatal if you aren't careful. Every two levels you will be taken to your sanctuary to survive a garbage collection "storm". Several buildings will be destroyed, and you need buildings to shelter from the storm. Run out of buildings, and you get deleted. This is how you die in the game, for real.

This gets really frustrating when you're having a run of bad luck. Finding characters, talking to them and making "prayers" to build your sanctuary or "lightning" to destroy exit barriers is very random; sometimes you might run around like a headless chicken for 20 seconds without finding anyone to speak to (and when the time limit for each deletion attempt is 45 seconds, that's a long time!), sometimes the lightning hits the same piece of ground over, and over, and you "waste" valuable time trying to escape the level, sometimes the price you pay for making a mini-game error is the deletion of 80% of your sanctuary buildings (other times you get off lightly). It feels unfair at times, yet when it's going your way it feels wonderful. It's as though the developer is telling you that life sometimes sucks!

Yet despite all this, I love the game. I really shouldn't, it does all these things that annoy me, and yet it's... it's just compelling, somehow magical, relaxing even if you're in the right frame of mind for it. If you're not, expect to rage quit! (it's CTRL+Q btw). I wouldn't blame you.
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11 of 13 people (85%) found this review helpful
5.7 hrs on record
Posted: June 26
Emogame and Emogame 2 were staples of my adolescent experience. They turned me on to a slew of music that I wouldn't have appreciated otherwise and managed to be both hilarious and thoughtful throughout. When I saw that the creator of those flash games, Jason Oda, had developed this odd-looking title, I was intrigued. So, I'll lay out the negatives first: unskippable intro (that you will have to sit through many many times), boring and awkward combat, unintuitive gameplay mechanics. With that in mind, the game is a remarkably beautiful meditation on mortality explored by proxy through slain video game characters facing deletion and finally oblivion. If you go into this expecting a hack and slash dungeon crawl, you will be sorely disappointed. This is more of an interactive poem than a game, and it excels in that respect.
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5 of 5 people (100%) found this review helpful
3.5 hrs on record
Posted: June 30
The intro is the best part of this game. The gameplay itself is fairly repetitive, and when I had reached the point of repeating levels or scenes, many of the sequences cannot be skipped even when I had seen them a number of times. I really like the concept which is why I bought it despite the poor reviews. I do not really care for the execution and was quickly bored with the title.

Additionally the Linux port is not very good. No resolution/fullscreen configuration without finding the config file and editing it, unlike the Windows launcher. It also does not handle widescreen aspect ratios unlike the Windows version.
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3 of 4 people (75%) found this review helpful
1.1 hrs on record
Posted: July 4
When I first saw this game in the Greenlight queue, I was astonished. The trailer looked wonderful. An action/platformer that is esentially a deep meditation on the existence of video game characters, with a simplistic yet stylish look, and not to mention, a great track to accompany the whole affair.

Once I saw it available in the Steam market, I bought it immediately (this never happens).

What I got was a little different than what I expected.

Yes, the deep philosophical message was there. The eerie, ethereal atmosphere was there. The melodious, calming soundtrack was there. But gameplay was not. At least, not what I was expecting exactly.

The game opens with a very beautiful sequence of death and transcendence into the after life (In terms of a defeated video game character). As wonderful as this opening is, you will get very sick of it. You will die quickly from the get go, and you will see this long cut scene each time you restart. But the first time around, it really sets the tone and feel of what is happening. Very melancholic and simple with an underlying complexity. From here on out is where my feelings for this game took a turn.

From the trailer, it looked very Zelda-ish (to which I'm a sucker for. See my review of "Anodyne"). This was certainly not the case. You did not really have freedom to explore. By freedom, I mean with enough time. As soon as this starts, you are on a kind of timer for each world. After a certain amount of time, the world around starts to fall apart and glitch; the system is essentially trying to delete you for good. You have to do a lot of walking around, talking, while every once in a while being subjected to a rather lackluster battle sequence. The point is to get out of the area you are in and move to the next area. Now, there is also a small town in another area of the game. It is here that you build up buildings which will also be subjected to termination. At some point in the game (I forget when, as it has been some time since I've played this game) you go into the town. The program starts systematically deleting the buildings. If you get hit by a lightning bolt, you are deleted, and this results in a game over. Then, it is time to start again, from the very beginning.

The game is rather difficult, and when I played, I found it annoyingly difficult to survive inside of the small town you construct. No matter where I went or the buildings I had, that bolt found its way to me, resulting in an instant game over.

I might give it another go another time, but it was a big disappointment. I like how they tried to really do something different, but in the end it wasn't fun. I give it a perfect ten for style and music, but for gameplay...let's just say I give it a much lower score. Maybe if it had been more free and open world, then it would have worked well. I don't expect a Zelda knock-off AGAIN...but Anodyne seemed to manage being Zelda without being Zelda.

Sorry creators of Continue?9876543210....Great concept. Not so great execution.
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1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
3.7 hrs on record
Posted: July 5
And though I left, I took with me their lightning and their prayers.

I've never come across a game more contemplative and philosophical. It's got a gorgeous pixel art design (like a more colorful Swords and Sworcery), hauntingly melancholy music, and a unique concept. You are a video game character, and the game starts when you die. You are set on the path for deletion, but have an opportunity to run. What do you do?
The game's story focuses on acceptance and reflection, which is at odds with its gameplay, which has a focus on action and timed sections that are fairly frenetic. And the action sequences are more challenging than you would expect from the rest of the game. That being said, the feelings this game engendered are not common for games, and if you have an interest in seeing what games can do outside of their traditional boundaries (but are capable enough to play traditional games), this is an experience you won't soon forget.
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1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
5.3 hrs on record
Posted: December 14
Not everyone is going to like this game. I can guarantee you this much. I, for one, love this game very much, it's a very metaphorical experience. Take note, this game has a bit of an arcade style to it. You play until you die, then start again from the beginning.

Yes, the game saves, automatically at the beginning of every level.

Yes, you can skip the introductory cutscene, you have to click somewhere and a box appears in the top-right corner saying "SKIP->"

Some people will not take appreciation of the metaphor used in this game. Others might, but will not enjoy the gameplay for some reason or another.
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2 of 3 people (67%) found this review helpful
0.6 hrs on record
Posted: July 2
There's a major problem with games as art. You need both the game and the art.

Is Continue?9876543210 art? Certainly. Is it a game? Yes.

Do these work together? No.

Binding of Isaac shows you can concentrate on the game; while Dear Esther shows you can concentrate on the art.

Now imagine shooting tears at Esther, and you can see what the problem with Continue is. Like salmon and marmalade, they work great on their own - but together you just feel nauseous.

Skrillexquest is a far better game with a similar concept - also by the author. Continue always feels like it's trying to hard.
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1 of 2 people (50%) found this review helpful
0.7 hrs on record
Posted: June 24
I am very much in love with the 'Indie' genre of games. It is inspirational when I hear a group of only a few people who go through the effort of making a game all by themselves. This game, being my game nomination of the year, has amazing art, an amazing soundtrack, a great storyline and decently appealing gameplay which makes for a fantastic game altogether. The only difference is, it was made by only one man.
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1 of 2 people (50%) found this review helpful
1.4 hrs on record
Posted: June 30
Ive had the game over a year now, and Ive decided to finally share what I think about it. Personally I think it's not worth the money, the music in the game is baassically the same few piano notes the whole time, which I admit is fitting since the game is being deleted, but there are large areas that you can explore, making you want to, but theres no time, you basically do the same gameplay over and over, talk to people, get a hint, get a blessing or a way out of the town and thats basically it.

The game is very repetitive and the combat is very buggy. The combat is you with a sword fihting deletion robots who hurt you by touching you, the problem is, they can get glitched inside of you and continue to kill you as you cant do anything.

The story is pretty dry to be honest, as everyone's life is falling before them you would think there would be tons of emotion? But really theres not. The main character ponders the idea of it breifly and just moves on. Everyone that you talk to basically says the same thing, or gives you a riddle, which you use to solve a question in some buildings, to get a blessing. Of which you do IN EVERY AREA. Then there are times where the "riddle" is the same as before, letting you already know the anwser.

The game has VERY LITTLE replay value after the second or third playthrough, trying to see if things are different, and they're not contributes to it, the game gets pretty boring, pretty fast. Then you'll most likely never play it again.

A few problems are that theres NO save to be found anywhere making you sit through the whole thing and IF YOU DIE you have to start ALL over again. And (as stated earlier) that you have limited time in each area, having no time to explore or anything of the such before you are killed. The combat is simple and hard at the same time, a NORMAL battle where you fight deleteion enimies with your sword, is fairly easy. Then you get to basically, "minigames" that depending on what they are, can be easy, or all the way to unrealistic expectations of you to beat the level. etc etc

As the closing note, I would like to say that the game is fairly short, about 45 minutes to an hour at best, and theres no reward for beating the game, you just can restart and do it again, but most likely, you wont want to. So this is Steam, the largest gaming area for deals, instead of spending money on this, you should get a game like Saints Row 4 or another game thats worth much more than this, for the same price.
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635 of 831 people (76%) found this review helpful
2.3 hrs on record
Posted: January 3
Before we continue we must ask ourselves: what is an experience? Not what is a game, because that is almost too broad to bother trying to put into words. But what is an experience? What is something you enjoy experiencing?

I cannot define this for all of you. An experience changes for each person- it is a variable that makes each person who they are.

Continue?9876543210 (wow that was fun to type out on the keyboard, I slid my finger down the number keys like some sort of badass) is definitely an experience. Whether it is a good one or a bad one is up to you. I personally felt like it made me think a lot about my life and what I take out of it, but I personally do not feel that much of the game other than the thought it provokes lives up to the price I paid for it, even at this discounted price of 8 dollars I paid for it. I personally think thinking should be free. What should be paid for is how the developer makes you think- either through visuals or audio or even story and gameplay.

The gameplay in this game is very basic. You run around and talk to people who usually just jabber on about strange things, but sometimes they open doors for you, and sometimes they sell you things. You are able to choose "lightning" or "prayer" when you enter these doors, and what these mean are up to the player to interpet, but what they do is either randomly spawn lightning to clear the path ahead or spawn a house in a town that is crucial to survive the later stages of the game. After 45 seconds to a minute though, garbage collection or something similar runs and takes you down to play a combat based minigame. After too many of these though, your game ends- but progressing to the next area resets this. So you are in a battle against time to progress to each area.

This gameplay sounds fine, but it is very repetitive. I was about to quit and take a break after the third one of these, but then I realized that there is no save feature in the game- the point is to play the game in one sitting it seems. And so I druged on (and how fitting to relate to the plot of the game), hoping the game wouldn't be TOO much of this. While the gameplay is unique and quirky, after the 3rd or 4th time through, it just gets old.

The music and the graphics are fitting to the theme of the game, but leave much to be desired. I found the graphics and music just plain boring to look at and listen to, and while there are some flashy scenes and very well done graphical choices during cutscenes, the levels look somewhat all the same in exception to a few that look amazing (the level where you're chasing down your reflections in the sea comes to mind) and in the end I just grew tired of it all very quickly.

It's very ironic that a game where you have to find peace with yourself grows harder and harder to get through. I found myself getting very bored with this game very quickly. But it's not about the game right? It's about the experience!

Well that my friends, I do not think is worth my 8 dollars. While it made me begin to think, I feel the game ITSELF did not make me think but rather the themes of it did. I apologize if that may be a mouthful, but it is hard to describe a game like this into words. In simpler terms, I feel like I could have just poked around the website of continue9876543210.com and gotten the same feelings I did instead of playing the game. And for that, I do not give it my personal reccomendation.

But experiences change for everyone. Who knows? Maybe you will enjoy it more than I did.
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178 of 220 people (81%) found this review helpful
2.5 hrs on record
Posted: January 3
A rich experience focused on the inevitable. You follow your main character's journey on the acceptance of his deletion by traveling and consulting with the inhabitants of other locales moments before their Garbage Collection. You have two primary options when speaking with the villagers, lightning or prayers. Lightning will help you escape the current level, or access secret areas that will aid you achieve your closure. Prayers will create a shelter based in your own town, which will protect the player from the deletion storm - literally lightning that deletes objects. Your ultimate goal is to survive long enough so the main character accepts his fate. The attitude at the time of their deletion depends on which villages you have been to, how many, and any "secret" areas you have been to which includes objects from your past and present.

The combat is fairly varied, but not overly complex. It does require skill, and this is certainly not a game you can skate by on without thinking what you are doing. To receive lightning or prayers from certain people, you might need to remember a fact about the town said by another villager. The combat can vary from side-scrolling challenges, to zelda-esque dungeon crawling, to arena "kill-house" style challenges. Depending how well you do can give you bonus lightning or keys which open doors in the villages, which allow you to speak to more villagers. I would advise against those who think the combat itself is the only reason to get the game- you will be dissapointed.

In addition to the combat and memorization, the skill of time-management is needed as well. Each village only has a certain amount of time before it's expiration. You have to prioritize what you need done. This is indicated by a countdown timer in the upper-right, once it hits zero there is a "stage" of degradation (Which varies how many there are by village). You will then enter a random combat scenario. Upon completion, you will return to the village which will have become slightly more hostile. Deletion monsters will roam the village which will delay you in your quest for shelter and closure.

It's an emotional ride that is open to your own interpretation. It does a grim subject matter well and was emotionally captivating enough to tug me along. And for that I am thankful.

Edit: Just would like to clarify on something some reviewers seem to have missed (Even though it's in the instructions). This game does have an auto-save feature each time you load a new area.
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232 of 317 people (73%) found this review helpful
3.0 hrs on record
Posted: January 16
Continue?9876543210 is a remarkable milestone in the history of gaming: the videogame equivalent of Vogon poetry.
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152 of 219 people (69%) found this review helpful
1.3 hrs on record
Posted: January 4
I'm a sucker for the TRON-like digital afterlife concept. So I went into C?9-0 eagerly expecting a deep, affecting experience. And for the first five or ten minutes, it seemed like it just might deliver on that...

Sadly, it very quickly descends into a qurky, poorly designed pile of...bits. Instead of feeling like a solid, well-thought out game, it feels more like an overly ambitious Digipen student project. The biggest problem is, you're thrust into a bizarre, abstract world without any sort of guidance.

"DEAREST FRIEND, YOU WILL BE CONFUSED AT FIRST, BUT BE BRAVE, IN TIME YOU WILL UNDERSTAND.", the game assures in a large, ubiquitous, fatiguing-to-read typeface. Part of me wonders if this line was a lampshade put in at the 11th hour of development to assuage confused newcomers.

I've spent more time than I'd care asking myself "what the hell is going on?!". Given the concept, this MAY be a conscious choice by the developer, since you're no longer in a 'game' and you're figuring it out as you go along just like the main character, Maggie. But as a player here in meatspace, I still need some sort of graceful introduction to the concepts.

Like, what the hell is 'Foo'? Apparently it's money. It says 0/5 RAM on the status bar. What does that mean? Oh, now I'm suddenly sucked into a Zelda-like overhead persective and attacking chattering teeth? Whoa, now I'm in a platform section where I have unexpectedly acquired a jump key, slaying more chattering teeth. Aaaand now I'm back to the Indian trailer park, talking to Juggalos.

Seriously.

To be fair, there IS a clumsy, minimal in-game manual to ham-fistedly explain some of this stuff, if you deicde to "spoil the mystery". And the more you bang your head against the wall, things begin to slowly connect together.

Unfortunately once you begin to weave together a vague notion of what's going on, you begin to realize that the core gameplay is not nearly as complex or interesting as you'd hoped. As an outsider, this has been an incredibly frustrating, confusing experience. Abstract concepts are great, but they need a clean and well-thought out game design to prop it up, more than most.

It's clear from other reviews that some players got a lot more out of this game, and I'm sure if I magically "got it" from the outset like they apparently did, I'd probably like it more, too. But as it currently stands, I'm confused as hell, and -- the bigger tragedy -- I feel no overwhelming desire to invest more time into understanding it further. In some ways, that's a worse failure than my benchmark for bitter mediocrity, "Thirty Flights of Loving". At least I was compelled to finish THAT, such as it was. But also, like that game, reviewers attributed to it a great weight of intellectual complexity that, frankly, I had a hard time giving it credit for.

Save your rupees, gang, and simply enjoy the lovely developer-provided screenshots. Imagine a great game built around those images and know that the game you have imagined probably DOES exist somwhere, out there, in-between the bytes of your computer's RAM.
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82 of 113 people (73%) found this review helpful
3.6 hrs on record
Posted: January 3
Despite the big thumbs up, I wouldn't recommend the game at its full price. It's good but you can get a lot more with $10 on Steam.

As for the content itself, its atmosphere sort of reminds me of a 3D Sword & Sworcery. However, I found Sword & Sworcery to be little more than a collection of pixel art and mysterious but ultimately meaningless dialogue whereas I found Continue to have genuine meaning that you can connect to your own life. The gameplay is not the focus in either game, but it is at least entertaining in Continue. Where it really excels is in its metaphorical meaning,

It is more art than game, designed to make you think as you race against time to build up what resistance you can to a fate you ultimately cannot escape. There is little replayability; you will discover most of what the game has to offer in a few short playthroughs. But I wouldn't call that a fault considering the goal of the game is to explore a theme, not to provide hours of entertainment. If that doesn't appeal to you, then avoid the game; otherwise, it's something to look into.
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32 of 38 people (84%) found this review helpful
0.9 hrs on record
Posted: May 8
Continue?9876543210 is a surrealistic adventure game that is somewhat stylized like an old RPG game. Or something like that. Continue is a very strange game; The basic idea is that you play as a video game character who is at the end of his life. The classic, 'Continue?' screen of arcade games of old has passed, and no quarters were inserted. And so, you have 'died', and enter into a realm where all data from a previous game goes to be erased, wiped clean for the world to start anew again for the new player, and New Game option. In this desolate space, data is assimilated into bytes and data, and you having not made your peace yet struggle to survive in a climate made to delete you.

In the game, you start on a level that is representative of some gameplay trope, IE town, field, ruins, etc. There are a variety of NPCs and locked doors. You can talk to the people, who will either try to sell you something, give you a hint of some sort in the level you're currently in, say something about the story of the game, or say some rather useless blabber. NPCs phase in and out of existence, however. There's also monsters that spawn on the level, and wander around. Touching them triggers a battle scene, that transitions to a different scene like an RPG game. However, the battles aren't turn-based, but real-time, and work more similarly to a Zelda game. However, what they exactly are changes per encounter. Some are top-down, some are side-scrolling, some make you defend something, or you just have to fight all-out. Winning battles or doing things around the level usually get you a key, which you can use to unlock one of the various locked structures around the level. Inside the structure you'll either find a shop, something to push the story, some sort of side-quest, or a person who will either build structures or cast lightning.

Now building structures and casting lightning is important. The game has a sort of time limit, both in levels and the overall game. The levels you go to are randomized, and each has differences to each other. However, you have a certain number of 'rounds' that will pass before the whole level is eliminated. If you're in a level when it's eliminated, it's game over and you get a bad ending. There is a time period you have to do stuff in the level, and then the round ends and you face some kind of challenge. This can be like a tricky level, a boss fight, some kind of puzzle, etc. They're random. If you win, you get a big benefit to your cause of survival, but if you lose you miss your chance for some aid. Aid for what? To exit the level, you need to get people you encounter to cast lightning, as casting lightning will destroy some of the blocks randomly blocking one of the several exits out of a level. However, you also need to build structures. After every two levels or so, you'll be in a sort of 'storm' you need to survive, or else its game-over. In the storms, you're in a town that is formed of the buildings you have made people build in the normal stages for you. A storm hits, and the buildings are stricken by lightning. You have to hide in a building and wait for the storm to pass, though if your building is hit and destroyed you have a certain time limit to quickly scamper around the town to another building. If there are no other buildings or you run out of time, it's game-over.

You will always be given a choice of either Lightning or Building Structures. Lightning will clear a path to the next level after a few lightning strikes, while building structures will create buildings to hide in during these 'storm' sections.

Basically the game is all about time management and succeeding in the various challenges that both the monsters, NPCs, and Round End's bring, for doing these allows you to gain chances at either Lightning or Structure Building, to make it past the individual level in time and to build structures for the storms that happen every two levels or so. You'll either like the game or not, it's a bit complicated to understand at first, and won't be fun for everyone.

Also there are side-quests you can do that effect your story. The game has multiple endings, possible level paths, and more... What you do in levels, what level path you take, and the like effects the ending you work towards. The game is kind of made to be played multiple times, as its not very long and you won't go to many of the levels or see the whole game in a single playthrough.

And the game gets weird. The story is told in a very indirect way, and some of the events that can happen are just absolutely bizarre. Honestly the story feels most similar to something that David Lynch might of concocted up if he were to make a video game about video games. Depending on who you are, that might either be a good or bad thing.

The game's oddness is supplemented perfectly by its audio department. The game has a haunting soundtrack, interesting but odd sound design, but it all fits the weird atmosphere of the game perfectly.

And there isn't really much to say. The game is deceptively complicated, but actually rather simple when you get down to it. It strikes me as a huge love it/hate it type of game, and something that'll divide people's opinions on whenever it's good or not.

My stance is that it's interesting. The game itself is okay, but the atmosphere and some of the surreal elements I enjoyed. Of course, if you're less fond of such things, there will probably be less to enjoy in the game for yourself. Basically said, while there is a game here, the game is more about the experience. And depending on who you are, that experience will either be worth taking, or it won't be.

Continue may be worth it if you like experience-based games with a surreal and strange edge that are open to interpretation. If you don't like that, you probably won't like the game. Like the game itself, it all seems so complicated but it's so simple, really.
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52 of 75 people (69%) found this review helpful
3.2 hrs on record
Posted: January 6
Somewhere, in the depths of a gamer’s RAM, you are a dead video game character who must come to terms with your imminent deletion. You know that you cannot escape deletion, only that you may delay it. Continue?987654321 aims to be an “experience” more than it does a traditional game, drawing an obvious metaphor and resting on the hope that we can identify with or be moved by it. For most, it will not be enough to justify the purchase but, if you’re still interested by the time you finish reading, it may be for you.

Your quest in Continue is to survive long enough to make peace by staying one step ahead of the garbage collection program, which will clear you from the RAM, bringing your existence, and your game, to an end. To accomplish this, you must travel to six villages in each playthrough—chosen at random from a pool of eleven—spawning shelters back in a main hub. After every two villages, you will be forced to ride out an intense lightning storm in this hub and, if you do not have enough shelters in place to survive the destruction, you will be deleted and it’s game over.

Each village you travel to is comprised of citizens, locked houses and multiple blocked exits. By speaking with villagers outside, you can learn important keywords and secrets, receive items and stat bonuses or pay to unlock houses. Within houses are shrines or more citizens, which grant you either lightning (partially clears exit paths) or prayer (spawns shelter back in the main hub) for returning the proper item or answering questions correctly. In rare instances, villagers may sell you entrance into trapped houses that will destroy shelters you have built, but other villagers will also warn you about them.

Time in each village is valuable as you only have two to three minutes to spawn as many shelters as possible, while also clearing an exit to escape. The difficulty is unforgiving and leaves little room for error. The game intends to give you no feeling of respite at any time. At regular intervals there will be a glitch, forcing you to play a brief minigame that opens up additional houses in the village based upon your success. Minigames usually involve combat where it’s also possible to die, in which case you can only revive by having a particular item, enough money, or by sacrificing some of your shelters.

For a game that tries to connect with the player on an emotional level, the dialogue is too often cheesy and nonsensical; the only thing the game managed to make me feel was nervous and hurried. Continue is a good example of a game where it's possible to get just as much out of it by watching someone else play. I can only recommend it to those looking to experience something truly unlike other games they have played, for better or worse, and who can accept that experience might not actually be fun.
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21 of 27 people (78%) found this review helpful
1.3 hrs on record
Posted: January 4
Not worthwhile. As much as I like strange "artsy" games like To The Moon, Antichamber, etc., I found myself struggling to like this one. I was really interested by the initial idea of Continue?9876543210, but in the end it delivers nothing but a load of horribly vague, cryptic, "2deep4u" nonsense with an absolutely bizarre excuse for a playable game. Very few things are explained or made to make sense.

The idea of "shelters" being the worst as far as the gameplay goes. How many of those freaking things do you need? I "died" from having 4. Okay, then I'll just go for more. But having over 14 shelters didn't save me from getting zapped. And then I had to sit through the agonisingly long cutscene yet again, to start at the beginning again. To do what differently, exactly?

This is far too "contemporary art" for me to think that it'll be enjoyable for most people. Whatever this is, the artist has picked a bad medium for it. If you want to tell a story that can turn out differently or have different meaning, tell it in a different way. A multi-choice visual novel would have been a far better medium, for example. Not a game that punishes the player for their expected failure by giving them an absolute waste of time of a story/experience.
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28 of 47 people (60%) found this review helpful
1.1 hrs on record
Posted: January 3
http://youtu.be/RkR19GOH_hs

A quirky, weird, and very unique game. Continue?9876543210 has a very nice art style paired with an awesome soundtrack. The gameplay is a bit too simple in my opinion however.

The concept of the game is what really drew me in. Playing as a failed video game character who must come to terms with their fate is something new that I hadn't experienced before and Continue?9876543210 executed it well.

I picked up this game about a week ago on the Humble Store's Winter Sale event so I've had a good bit time to play with it before it launched on Steam.
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10 of 14 people (71%) found this review helpful
3.0 hrs on record
Posted: January 6
This is one of the most confusing games I have ever played (From what I read on the store page it's supposed to be a philosophical, emotional & artsy game but to be honest I'm still confused as ♥♥♥♥ on what I just played), So from what I experienced from playing the game your a dead videogame character who is trying to escape permanent deletion a.k.a The Garbage Collector but I personally believe it's kinda like a survival mode with a story added in so anyways as your slaying some of The Garbage Collector's minions you have to talk to people, gain lightning or prayers (The lightning is for clearing unreachable exits and the prayers are for building shelters so you can escape deletion later on), Solve questions/Return property & all sorts of other ♥♥♥♥ you have to do as a dead videogame character. (Bear with me I'll try my best to explain the game)

Pros:

1. I love the idea of playing as a dead videogame character so you can learn his or her experience with death

2. There is a few references to classic games like space invaders for ex. (Continue?9876543210 also reminds me of Sword & Sworcery kinda)

3. Some people might like the idea of how confusing the game is so they can solve it's fogged mystery

4. Easy Controls

5. Good Pixel Art

6. Decent Music

Cons:

1. There is one level in the game that I strongly disagree with and I don't understand the dev's vision of making it (Anita Sarkeesian is a hypocritical & hateful ♥♥♥♥ but MundaneMatt made a vid about the subject so I suggest you watch his vid & if any future game devs are reading this please don't mention Anita in any of your levels because in my opinion she makes herself look like an ♥♥♥ all the god damn time) http://continue9876543210.com/princess/ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9KU4Gapr-OE

2. I hate the timed levels because I value exploring & solving puzzles at my own pace but that's just a minor complaint

3. The game gets really repetitive around the 3rd or 4th time playing the game

4. I don't recommend paying the full price of the game since the game is confusing for most people & I just want to warn you that it's very foggy on the story side

5. The game doesn't have a save button or a load button (It has autosave but you still start at the beginning anyways which is ♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥)

Overall I have mixed opinions on the game & this game isn't for everyone but this game just ♥♥♥♥ing sucks ♥♥♥ because it was executed quite horribly but maybe someone else might like this game. (I give some credit to the dev for making this game even though it has one of the laziest game titles I have ever read & before I go the escape button is CTRL+Q in case you want to escape this ♥♥♥♥ty game)
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10 of 14 people (71%) found this review helpful
0.5 hrs on record
Posted: January 4
I bought this game hoping for a trip through the existential quandries in my mind (from the description it seemed it would be just that). The problem is, the timing is so forced, and the game is so disjointed and random that the message can be totally lost. I really, really want to like it, but there's just nothing in it that leads you down the path I was hoping to find myself on, and that's a really unfortunate let down...
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