9.03m, is a short, first person, art/empathy game for PC. Not a game in the traditional sense of the word; it aims to humanise, and remember the victims of the 2011 Japanese tsunami. The media is quick to put figures to death tolls in such disasters, and 9.03m tries to remind people of the individuals behind those figures. 9.
User reviews:
Overall:
Very Positive (845 reviews) - 81% of the 845 user reviews for this game are positive.
Release Date: Sep 12, 2013

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Recent updates View all (5)

May 5

Our Second Game Glitchspace Is Now On Steam!

Hello 9.03m players!

Firstly, t's been a long time since we last made a post on here. Being our first game, 9.03m was of course a very important project for us when we were starting out and we couldn't be more thankful to everyone for the well wishes and support they gave the game, especially when tackling such a difficult subject matter.

Another reason we're posting is to let you know about our second game Glitchspace. Glitchspace is a title that started development before 9.03m was even released (so three years in the making!) that we've just released on Steam: Glitchspace

Glitchspace tackles another interesting and difficult topic, programming! It took us a long time to get to where we are today with this project, so if you're interested in checking out our new game you can see it in action here:



http://store.steampowered.com/app/290060/

As a last note: we still get requests for the game's soundtrack. That's something that we intend to revisit now to see if we can put it together for you. It will be a free release.

Space Budgie

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Reviews

“It’s beautiful. It’s tear-jerking. Simply writing about it does not do it justice.”
5/5 – TwoDashStash

“9.03m’s quiet approach exposes the limitations of “character development” and reflects adult experience. But the most powerful part of 9.03m is its ending. How many times can we say that about a video game?”
10/10 – Fate of the Game

“It’s moving, it’s gorgeous, and if you don’t have the feels yet, you’ll get them. I won’t say any more, but 9.03m‘s ending will stick with you for a long time.”
Jetpack Joust

Steam Greenlight

About This Game

9.03m, is a short, first person, art/empathy game for PC. Not a game in the traditional sense of the word; it aims to humanise, and remember the victims of the 2011 Japanese tsunami. The media is quick to put figures to death tolls in such disasters, and 9.03m tries to remind people of the individuals behind those figures.

9.03m is set on Baker Beach in San Francisco, where debris from the tsunami has washed ashore in the years following the tsunami.

To play, you must find the butterflies.

All royalties (as of 19/12/2013) are donated to charity. Half of all received Space Budgie royalties go to Aid For Japan (http://www.aidforjapan.org.uk), a charity that helps children who lost their parents in the tsunami. The other half goes to Redr (http://www.redr.org.uk) a charity that helps in disaster scenarios.

System Requirements

    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows XP (SP2) or Later
    • Processor: Dual Core
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Shader Model 3 compatible video card. NVIDIA 8000 series or higher. Radeon HD 3450 or higher.
    • DirectX: Version 9.0c
    • Storage: 800 MB available space
    • Sound Card: DirectX 9.0c Compatible
    Recommended:
    • OS: Windows XP (SP2) or Later
    • Processor: Dual Core
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce 210/300 series or higher. Radeon HD 7450 or higher.
    • DirectX: Version 9.0c
    • Storage: 800 MB available space
    • Sound Card: DirectX 9.0c Compatible
Customer reviews
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Overall:
Very Positive (845 reviews)
Recently Posted
kztk
( 0.6 hrs on record )
Posted: June 28
Nice approach, but failed storytelling.

6/10
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Mithaldu
( 0.3 hrs on record )
Posted: June 26
Buy this, if you wish to support a good cause.

That said, as both a game and a means of telling a story, this just doesn't do its job well. For someone who experiences this without explanation, it would be a complete and utter mystery, since the game itself never even approaches the topic of "tsunami". But even knowing what it is supposed to be about, it leaves many questions open. Only if you actually scroll down and read the description, you learn where the player is supposed to be here and what is going on. But even then there are questions left open. Are the items things people actually found or are they symbolic standins? What is the ending supposed to be? Why is an american beach so gigantic?

A little more effort, a little bit of explanation in the game itself, and it could've been an experience different from confusion, followed by trying to find ultimately half-baked explanations elsewhere.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
[ᴸᴼᴳ] FavoR
( 1.8 hrs on record )
Posted: June 25
9.03m is technically not a game, but an interactive video. It raises awareness towards tsunamis and those unaware to the effects of one. 9.03m is a very deep and meaningful game, and the money from every purchase contributes to 2 wonderful charities which help the victims of the japanese tsunami.

9.03m is all about symbolization, in which you need to figure things out for yourself. The total game doesn't take too long to complete, though the story is amazingly powerful. You're on a beach, on which the tsunami hit. You're task is to follow the glowing butterflies which lead you to the ghost of a victim. Heading to them in the dim moonlight, you will find a possession of theirs in which you need to find a clue to inform you of their name, history, etc. The whole game is based on supporting the victims and raising awareness, and in my opinion it has succeeded in that. 9.03m is not meant to be played as a game, more as a meaningful and sad story.

The game is simplistic though meaningful. Symbols are a large part of the game, creating mystery and suspense. With all it's earnings headed directly to 2 charities, this game is worth the full price. An enjoyable and meaningful story.

Score: 8.5/10
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Nudiustertian
( 0.2 hrs on record )
Posted: June 25
Press E and move mouse to pay respects.

Pro: the proceeds of this experience go to charity.

Con: this makes only the most token attempt at engagement. It would have worked just as well as as a video, really.

It is, without a doubt, very hard to engage people with a massive tragedy on a human level, so I can't really fault the creators for their efforts, especially since, at worst, it'll take up 15 minutes of your time. Based on that, and the fact that you should see it as a freebie to go with your donation, I'm still recommending this. But unless you already went into this with some way to make sense of a disaster of this scale, 9.03m is probably not going to be the thing connecting you to it.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Thunder Wing
( 0.3 hrs on record )
Posted: June 11
First off I want to say that this game is not for everyone.
You literally wander around a beach for a few minutes picking stuff up. That's about it.

That said, the first reason I am actually recommending this game is that not only is it less than half the price of a cup of "affordable" coffee, but 100% of that money goes to a good cause.

Not only does the money go to a good cause, but the cause it goes towards is reflected in the game. I can see where they were going with it, and it was interesting, but it just didn't get me. I didn't "feel the feels" (whatever the heck that's supposed to mean). The game didn't make me feel anything, and honestly if it was any longer I don't know if it would have captivated my interest

Gameplay wise, it's nothing special. There are no special controls (you walk, and pick stuff up, there isn't even running or jumping), the visuals aren't that great, but the overall colour scheme is fairly soothing, especially when combined with the music.

That said, for what the game is, they did a good job, it's pretty much exactly what they tell you you are buying, and if you do your research before buying like any intelligent person should before crying and rating something bad, you can figure out if it's for you or not.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Aislynn
( 0.1 hrs on record )
Posted: May 24
Product received for free
Not a bad game, looks pretty just not a game for me. I think someone who would like this game would have a lot of fun though.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Treme
( 0.4 hrs on record )
Posted: May 20
Yes well... nice.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Cjcomplex
( 0.2 hrs on record )
Posted: May 5
A short but beautiful game about the tragic loss of life during the 2011 tsunami. It has a solid soundtrack with a pleasing aesthetic, though a tad too much blue for my liking. While the game is rather short (less than 20mins max), it is the approriate length for the message that it is trying to convey, and thus does not overstay it's welcome with its rather repetitive nature.

At the given price point, this is a title worth picking up and spending a few minutes play.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
greymusic
( 0.2 hrs on record )
Posted: April 29
At this point it's probably fair to say I've developed a dislike for 'walking simulators'--as a gametype, they seem to be strung together by the bare minimum of required interaction from the player, which to me seems a betrayal to the medium of video games as a whole. '9.03m' is inarguably a game of that type, asking no more of you than a depressed W key and occasional fiddling with the mouse. At first, I found the objects the game wanted me to interact with interesting, but eventually they became part of an overly sentimental narrative--childrens' toys, specifically--and I found it harder to care. In terms of actual gameplay, '9.03m' is essentially a slide show which you are holding W to navigate.

The world that's constructed within, however beautiful (and it is beautiful, in a mystical, fantasy-light type way), is ultimately incredibly linear. The game has one objective at a time it wants you to go to, and if you go anywhere else, the screen fades to black and points you back towards your objective. So that there's not even a world to interact with--just the idea of a world, and the idea of the people that might have lived within it.

Up until the end of the game, I was ready to deem '9.03m' unsuccessful--but in a strange way, it managed to make even the device of player frustration and incompetence useful in its narrative message. I won't spoil anything, because the game is incredibly short, but if you play thru the entire thing and aren't at least slightly moved, it's possible art games of this type aren't for you at all. I was beginning to think they weren't for me, but '9.03m' seems to be on the shallowest side of the 'gameplay' spectrum, yet still proved a rewarding experience. I recommend it to anyone who wants to examine the interaction between art, tragedy, and games, but with the warning that the actual 'game' is probably about twenty minutes long in total.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
t0mas
( 0.6 hrs on record )
Posted: April 29
バスツアー Aesthetic スツ 👌👀👌👌👀👌👀👌 👌👌 👌 💯 👌 👀 👀 👀 👌👌 Aesthetic ブル shitНO0Оଠ ✔✔if i do ƽaү so my self 💯👌👀👌👀👌 i say so 💯 👌👀👌👀👌 Aesthetic
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Most Helpful Reviews  In the past 30 days
9 of 9 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
0.2 hrs on record
Posted: June 25
Press E and move mouse to pay respects.

Pro: the proceeds of this experience go to charity.

Con: this makes only the most token attempt at engagement. It would have worked just as well as as a video, really.

It is, without a doubt, very hard to engage people with a massive tragedy on a human level, so I can't really fault the creators for their efforts, especially since, at worst, it'll take up 15 minutes of your time. Based on that, and the fact that you should see it as a freebie to go with your donation, I'm still recommending this. But unless you already went into this with some way to make sense of a disaster of this scale, 9.03m is probably not going to be the thing connecting you to it.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
6 of 7 people (86%) found this review helpful
Recommended
0.3 hrs on record
Posted: June 11
First off I want to say that this game is not for everyone.
You literally wander around a beach for a few minutes picking stuff up. That's about it.

That said, the first reason I am actually recommending this game is that not only is it less than half the price of a cup of "affordable" coffee, but 100% of that money goes to a good cause.

Not only does the money go to a good cause, but the cause it goes towards is reflected in the game. I can see where they were going with it, and it was interesting, but it just didn't get me. I didn't "feel the feels" (whatever the heck that's supposed to mean). The game didn't make me feel anything, and honestly if it was any longer I don't know if it would have captivated my interest

Gameplay wise, it's nothing special. There are no special controls (you walk, and pick stuff up, there isn't even running or jumping), the visuals aren't that great, but the overall colour scheme is fairly soothing, especially when combined with the music.

That said, for what the game is, they did a good job, it's pretty much exactly what they tell you you are buying, and if you do your research before buying like any intelligent person should before crying and rating something bad, you can figure out if it's for you or not.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
4 of 4 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
1.8 hrs on record
Posted: June 25
9.03m is technically not a game, but an interactive video. It raises awareness towards tsunamis and those unaware to the effects of one. 9.03m is a very deep and meaningful game, and the money from every purchase contributes to 2 wonderful charities which help the victims of the japanese tsunami.

9.03m is all about symbolization, in which you need to figure things out for yourself. The total game doesn't take too long to complete, though the story is amazingly powerful. You're on a beach, on which the tsunami hit. You're task is to follow the glowing butterflies which lead you to the ghost of a victim. Heading to them in the dim moonlight, you will find a possession of theirs in which you need to find a clue to inform you of their name, history, etc. The whole game is based on supporting the victims and raising awareness, and in my opinion it has succeeded in that. 9.03m is not meant to be played as a game, more as a meaningful and sad story.

The game is simplistic though meaningful. Symbols are a large part of the game, creating mystery and suspense. With all it's earnings headed directly to 2 charities, this game is worth the full price. An enjoyable and meaningful story.

Score: 8.5/10
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
Most Helpful Reviews  Overall
87 of 97 people (90%) found this review helpful
3 people found this review funny
Recommended
1.1 hrs on record
Posted: April 24, 2015
Dreamlike atmosphere and calm soundtrack. 9.03m is dedicated to people who have lost lives in tsunami which occurs around the coast of Japan in 2011. Actually this is more experience than an exploration game.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
254 of 343 people (74%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
0.3 hrs on record
Posted: January 21, 2014
How do I write a review about a game that was developed in the name of charity and stay objective. It's difficult to say the least, yet I find it difficult to recommend this to anyone unless you want to donate and it's on sale.

First of all, if I had to describe what this was, I would be more likely to call it an interactive art exhibit. The graphics and color choices are gorgeous of course, but all you do is walk on a beach, follow butterflies to items, spin the item until you locate another butterfly, then click on said butterfly, rinse, repeat.

It was designed to be experienced, not played or beaten, and the subject matter is supposed to illicit an emotional response from the user. Unfortunately, I don't think that subject matter was conveyed properly for it's intended results.

Honestly, if it wasn't for the discription on the store page, it would be hard for me discern the message this game is trying to convey. The idea is that each item you locate belonged to a victim of the Japanese Tsunami, however the game gives you no indication of this. After each item is located, the tide goes out a bit to uncover the next, maybe this was an artistic decision on the devloper's part to convey something deep. Locating the lost artifacts pushes the Tsunami back, acknowledging the victim's loss undoes the damage of the Tsunami, something like that? Maybe it's up to the player to discern for themselves how to interpert this. The focus of the game doesn't become clear until you locate the butterfly on the last item, which takes about 10 minutes from starting the game, if that. After which some text appears on the screen explaining the damage the Tsunami had done in Japan, then the credits roll.

I feel terrible about not recommending this game due to the nature of the title. How can you say no when a percentage of the profits go to the Tsunami Relief Fund? I want to make it perfectly clear that I in no way disagree with the game's message, and support the developers for donating to the charity through this title, I just disagree with it's design. The message could have been conveyed in a more understandable and focused way. As I played I knew what this title was trying to do, I just never felt that it accomplished it's task, and that's the only reason I couldn't recommend it.

Let this be a lesson to developers everywhere. Wanting to create a game to help educate the world of a foreign cataclysmic natural disaster, and to donate to a charity, is not enough. That game must be worth the time of the people donating, and more importantly, the game must make it's message clear. Otherwise people who wish to donate can just do it manually through the charity's website.

Thank you Space Budgie for developing this title and choosing to help out of the kindness of your hearts. I'm sure families all over Japan praise your work and thank you for your time. I wish more developers would put their talents to good use by creating things like this in the name of charity. Please don't take the fact that I'm not recommending this game as a personal attack in anyway, or a stance against your message. Don't ever stop creating and helping humanity the best way developers can. Your work is appreciated, maybe even more than you know. However, as a reviewer, I have to be honest, even though in cases like this one, I wish I didn't.

If you wish to donate to the Japanese Tsunami Relief Fund and other charities that the proceeds of this game are going towards without purchasing this game, here are some links.

Japan Earthquake and Tsunami Relief Fund
Aid For Japan
People and Skills for Disaster Relief
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86 of 107 people (80%) found this review helpful
Recommended
0.3 hrs on record
Posted: November 26, 2013
Great concept - a game that is not a game - but an experience instead. I enjoyed it immensely, and it gave me a closer understanding of the real losses of the victims of the Tsunami. This is not for someone who loves beating a traditional game - you don't beat this, you experience it.

It only takes 15 minutes to finish, but at 2 euros, half of which go to Aid For Japan, it's definately worth buying.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
79 of 97 people (81%) found this review helpful
Recommended
0.3 hrs on record
Posted: June 11, 2014
This game lasted no longer than twenty minutes, but it was truly beautiful. The world is entrancing; the music is magical; the premise is heart-warming. This game proves that you don't need a gimmicky gameplay element or splendiferous graphics to create a work of art. It's a game that shows emotion like no other, and relies on your empathy for other human beings, and your respect for human life. It may be short, but it is one of the deepest games I have ever played, and is dedicated to the men, women and children who died in the 2011 Japan Tsunami.A fully recommended buy.
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49 of 54 people (91%) found this review helpful
Recommended
0.3 hrs on record
Posted: February 10
A monster named Joseph Stalin once said "A single death is a tragedy; a million deaths is a statistic." Sadly, there is a cold, blunt truth in this statement. When we hear about a natural disaster or an ongoing war somewhere in the world, and read about the number of casualties on television screens, newspapers or history books, that's all we usually see: statistics. We live in an age that detachment and conformism are the norm, so it rarely bothers us enough to even think about collateral damage, if we are not a part of the collateral affected by it.

Here, all you'll ever find will be a collection of blurry scenes, scattered around a beach lot in San Francisco, painted in shades of blue and purple. Not one of the greater works of Unreal engine, surely. As we start the experience, we are asked to follow the butterflies and that's all we are going to do for the next 15 minutes, until the game ends. We walk in the beach lot, approach disappearing shades and discover phantom objects to contemplate on people that we know nothing about. We probably never will...

9.03m is not a game in the conventional manner. It is a really short, interactive art exhibition that serves as an empathy simulation. It is a tribute and a requiem for people who lost their lives in 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, aiming to humanize the victims by presenting hypothetical anecdotes from their lives, hopes and dreams. It is not a good game, neither necessarily quite successful in an artistic manner; but here with this specific project, it really is the thought that counts and nothing else. All profit made through the sales are sent to Aid for Japan and Redr charity organizations. With this ridiculously low price tag, it really is a choice of donating or not rather than buying a game.

Please also check out Lady Storyteller's Curator page here - follow for regular updates on reviews for other games!
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43 of 49 people (88%) found this review helpful
Recommended
0.2 hrs on record
Posted: March 2, 2014
9.03m is a game that I don't think needs to be reviewed. It's intention is not to be a ground breaking evolution of the medium, nor is it supposed to even be fun. A short 15 minute experience, it is meant to be a game of remembrance; dedicated to all that were affected by the disastrous tsunami that hit Japan in 2011.

Similar to something like Proteus, 9.03m doesn't have a narrative or any real mechanics to speak of. Wandering along a quiet beach, you are asked simply to follow the trail of butterflies which lead you to the scattered items of the people that used to live there. It's a decidedly somber experience, but also a very beautiful one (both in terms of presentation and purpose), the core message is one of hope; that those who were lost are not forgotten, and those who survive will be able to rebuild and live on despite the tragedy that befell them.

With how little it costs and the fact that 100% of the proceeds go to charity, there is no reason I would tell someone not to support 9.03m. It doesn't matter that it's short, or that it's hardly a game, because it isn't supposed to be; it is merely intended as a short moment of reflection, and has more meaning behind it than possibly anything else you will play in a long time. That alone is reason enough for me to ask you to give it a chance, whether it looks like something that would normally interest you or not.

You can read more of my writing on Kritiqal.
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65 of 85 people (76%) found this review helpful
Recommended
0.4 hrs on record
Posted: November 20, 2013
It is a very, very short game, about 15-25 minutes of not-conventional gameplay.
It was supposed to be art, and i think they do it well, with a good atmosphere and a real good piano soundtrack.

For those who like to have new experiences - and an emotional one - and doesn't bother themselves with not traditional gameplay mechanics.
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