Journey to the dark heart of the Edgewood Home for Lost Children in this fiendishly difficult action RPG! When her teacher stepped out of the classroom a month ago, Cordy never imagined he would be gone for good. Now her fellow students have turned on each other as the school descends into chaos.
User reviews: Very Positive (254 reviews)
Release Date: Jan 29, 2014

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Recommended By Curators

"Similar to Binding of Issac but with a few differences, and in a beautifully drawn Gothic style. Just good ole dungeon exploring and monster fighting."

Recent updates View all (9)

October 29

Hallow Day's Update (v459)

Dear friends, we are happy to announce the Edgewood Hallow Day update. Allegations of student unrest, vengeful ink creatures, and the continued reign of Krass-Skull (move speed +40% in this update) are no reason to cease our proud institution's annual festivities. We are confident that the avian skeleton problem last year was simply a statistical aberration.

We have a hallow handful of fun new items for you in this update -- hope you enjoy them. Let us know what you think!

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June 27

New Experimental Patch is Now Accessible (v455)

Small update to Experimental branch:

  • Shoelaces now help you run faster as well
  • Solitary library floor should no longer have a random floor characteristic
  • A Second and Third Helping should now give XP when killed
  • Woundwort Fortress defense slightly reduced
  • Friendly Foot Stools should no longer spawn extra body parts if you pause and unapuse repeatedly during the fight

1 comments Read more

About This Game

Journey to the dark heart of the Edgewood Home for Lost Children in this fiendishly difficult action RPG!

When her teacher stepped out of the classroom a month ago, Cordy never imagined he would be gone for good. Now her fellow students have turned on each other as the school descends into chaos. Cordy must battle feral classmates and dangerous creatures as she ascends to the cruel Administrators’ offices atop the Edgewood Home for Lost Children.

Our Darker Purpose is a top-down, rogue-like action RPG that combines the ingenuity of genre-defining classics with the expansiveness and accessibility of modern day action adventure games. The gameplay is steeped in a variety of influences ranging from A Link to the Past to The Binding of Isaac to Diablo. We love games with great mechanics and awesome, bizarre storylines, and that’s what we’re creating with Our Darker Purpose.

Each playthrough features a unique set of procedurally generated levels. Death is permanent, but your accomplishments earn you resources to buy lesson and upgrades in the afterlife... and your education lasts forever. Every game teaches you more about the Edgewood Home for Lost Children, the disappearance of the adults, and the darker purpose of the Administrators.

Key Features


Fast-Paced, Combat-Oriented Gameplay: Face unique boss encounters and challenging enemy mechanics! The Edgewood Home is a merciless environment. Dodge between fireballs and flying desks while your former classmates try to pummel you into the walls, and that’s just the lower levels…

Character Variety and Customization: Assemble selections of randomized perks and upgrades to reflect your play-style – tanky bruiser, glass cannon, fleet-footed assassin, or anything else. Assemble your skills into devastating combinations… or pick style perks with no benefit at all, at your peril.

Oh Yeah, and It Takes Place in a Sinister Orphanage: Prepare for a an unflinching look at what happens when an already terrifying boarding school/orphanage goes all Lord of the Flies, and try not to get eaten by any of the possessed furniture. Only the psychologically strongest gamers will be able to withstand the insightful taunts of the Administrators themselves…

Gameplay


Allocate precious skills

Uncovering Edgewood’s dark secrets will yield valuable experience for Cordy. Each time she levels up, you’ll be able to select from one of two new abilities that she can acquire, depending on your play style and the situation at hand. You will never be as strong as you need to be, so prepare for some nail-biting choices…

Choose your own ghastly fate

The house is different every game, and every level is uniquely generated. But fear not, there’s more than one way to ascend through a dystopic Victorian manor! Pick your route – would you rather battle a feral horde than risk an encounter with the dangerous Capulets? The choice is yours! Of course, each floor offers unique credit tokens to buy new upgrades, so choose wisely…

Acquire eternal powers

Adorable, creepy, stylized Edgewood Home students don’t give up when they fail --- they go to class. Each time you lead Cordy to a fiery (or chalky, or spikey, or venomy, or monstery) demise, you get some time to strategize with your kindly scarecrow guidance counselor. He is happy to offer his one-of-a-kind insight in many academic disciplines…

System Requirements

    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows Vista/7
    • Processor: 1.6 Ghz
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: X1950 Pro, 7900 GT
    • DirectX: Version 10
    • Hard Drive: 300 MB available space
Helpful customer reviews
4 of 5 people (80%) found this review helpful
0.1 hrs on record
Posted: October 30
It's Binding of Isaac but with core gameplay that fails to engage. Character movement and shooting feels clunky, and bosses are tedious, home-made affairs. Novel ideas, like rooms larger than a single screen, are poorly executed when in practice they result in the player running into haphazardly placed enemies they couldn't see at the initial scroll. The art is often difficult to read, and hitboxes are wonky.

The overwrought text interludes and gothic aesthetic are potentially charming, but don't make up for the sheer clunkiness of moving and shooting in a game that relies on those things as its core mechanics. At this price, a very bad idea!
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4 of 9 people (44%) found this review helpful
1.3 hrs on record
Posted: October 30
A lot like Binding of Isaac, only with a girl, no controller support and generally less interesting.
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0 of 3 people (0%) found this review helpful
7.7 hrs on record
Posted: October 14
it`s like binding of isaac, i love to play these kinda games!
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2 of 10 people (20%) found this review helpful
0.1 hrs on record
Posted: October 30
A twin stick shooter without native controller support. That is so game breaking in itself that it's impossible to give the actual game a chance, which is a shame because it has a very nice art style.
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2 of 19 people (11%) found this review helpful
84.3 hrs on record
Posted: October 11
NOT a binding of issac ripoff
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6.4 hrs on record
Posted: October 31
Appealing art style, fantastic soundtrack, and overall an atmosphere I find much more interesting than Binding of Issac, which is the first thing all people compare it to.

Some quick things to note:
You only have 4-directional shooting. If you're shooting while strafing, the shot will fire at an angle, also requiring precise movement while shooting.
Hitboxes are odd, but you get used to them after a while.
Your character isn't very mobile unless you utilize the dodge mechanic, so remember to use it in combat.
It's very expensive for what it is. It's on Humble Bundle right now, so I'd recommend getting it there.
Where the balls is the soundtrack!?
Got the Touhou flowing through my veins a few times.

Ultimately, though, this review is coming from someone who has never played Risk of Rain, Binding of Issac, or any other games people compare it to. But this is because it's the first that I looked at that just from the screenshots and description, it grabbed a lot more of my attention.
I'll check out Binding of Issac when the rerelease comes out.
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66 of 85 people (78%) found this review helpful
24.2 hrs on record
Posted: May 9
Our Darker Purpose has so much potential - the art style is gothic and frequently impressive, the lore of the Edgewood Orphanage setting is rich, and it has a few unique mechanics in terms of incremental buffs tied in with a leveling system. And it squanders it all.

Our Darker Purpose aspires to be the next Binding of Isaac - it's a top down, twin-stick, rogue-lite with an exhausting array of usable and passive items. But it's worse in every way, and three times more expensive to boot. I couldn't even fathom pouring more than 10 hours into this game, let alone the 100 hours Isaac can satisfy. What it comes down to is gameplay. Signs of sloppy design are on display almost by the minute. The hitboxes of enemies are incomprehensible and your pathetic, pixel-size shots pass through even the largest of bosses for no discernible reason. Movement is imprecise and, without rolling everywhere, is slow and clunky. Everything takes far too much damage before it dies and deals far too much damage, each creature doubling in strength, HP and defense after every level, as opposed to the strict rules governing monster types in Isaac. Difficulty is never an issue if it's fair, but the poor design choices present the challenge as cruelly unfair. A player's skill will never be able to respond to impossible to dodge hazards that appear the instant a player enters a room, or the awkward placement of innumerable indecipherable objects that block player projectiles and obstruct any sense of movement.

In the end, the greatest crime Our Darker Purpose commits is an obvious empty ploy to prolong the length of its campaign. Rather than implement as large an array of items as Isaac or Risk of Rain, encouraging a sense of discovery and experimentation, a lazily implemented upgrade system built around earning 'credits' in a poorly designed menu sets positive bonuses for the next run. A next run that you won't want to make.
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15 of 22 people (68%) found this review helpful
37.1 hrs on record
Posted: June 28
"Our Darker Purpose" is a stew composed of "Binding of Isaac"'s gameplay, a "Don't Starve" art style, and an atmosphere similar to Tim Burton's earlier movies. Whenever I start it up, I feel like I am playing an extension of "Coraline."

If you have played "Binding of Isaac," you will feel at home. If not, do not fret. This is an isometric roguelike game. You start off as a weak Cordy, throwing tiny fireballs at malformed students. You progress through levels, picking up items, until you either die and start over, or beat a chapter and repeat the process, having unlocked another section of the towering orphanage. By the end, you feel powerful, even though you will only have a maximum of two active attacks (your basic fireball and an on-use item).

This game is tough. Even if you are extremely skilled at dodging enemy attacks, you will likely fail or take a very long time to win. Your victory depends on getting the right item drops and the right upgrades, when you level up. However, there is a permanent upgrade system, where you spend credits earned after beating levels. Along with that, new items are unlocked, for accomplishing ingame achievements. This gives "Our Darker Purpose" heaps of replay value, and there is even a hard mode that can be unlocked, for those interested in an even bigger challenge.

There are some balance issues in the game, mainly with bosses. Some bosses feel like they have just the right amount of health, and others, mainly at the middle sections of the game, have way too much health and on-screen attacks *cough Time Keeper cough stationary plant boss that I cannot remember the name of* going on. If you get lucky with items, they are not too bad, but even then, these bosses will take quite some time to down. End-game enemies also take a lot of hits, depending on your build. By itself, this would not be an issue. These enemies, however, are usually jammed together in rooms full of hazards, causing some mild annoyance with the amount of kiting that has to be done.

The game is, as a whole, fantastic. The developers have given it several sizable updates, and it looks like it will get even more. It is very polished, with anti-crash measures put in place. It even has a borderless window mode (!!!). Help support these developers, and buy this game.
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8 of 9 people (89%) found this review helpful
12.7 hrs on record
Posted: September 20
There are definitely things to like in Our Darker Purpose. It has great atmosphere backed up by a great art style and music. Everything is functional, but the more I played, the more one thought kept coming back: "The Binding of Isaac did this better."

Our Darker Purpose plays very similarly to Binding of Isaac, but just about everything it does, Isaac does better. Isaac has more variety of powerups and enemies. Isaac has a deeper and more interesting resource management system. Our Darker Purpose is much more focussed on the moment-to-moment combat then big picture balancing of resources. There are no keys, and your "bombs" are used exclusively for fighting. Most upgrades offer only numerical stat increases. The actual gameplay, however, has different ideas. Hit detection is awkward, enemies and hazards are more annoying or frustrating than interesting, and for all the focus on numerical upgrades, you never really feel more powerful than when you start. Isaac had it's share of numerical upgrades, but on any given run, you were bound to find at least one item that fundamentally changed how you approached the rest of the game. Each run felt different and unique. Each run of Our Darker Purpose just feels the same, but with the numbers shuffled around a bit.

At the end of the day, if you spend all your time with a game thinking about a different, better game, then that's not a very good sign for the game you're playing. If you've completed everything in The Binding of Isaac and really need something similar to hold you over until the remake, you'll get some enjoyment out of Our Darker Purpose. To everyone else, I cannot recommend this game as long as The Binding of Isaac exists.
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1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
43.2 hrs on record
Posted: September 30
Well made rogue-like game, resembles a lot Binding of Isaac.
And that is not bad at all, because ODP has a different, darker atmosphere.
I suggest this game to anyone who likes a good rogue-like and wants something new.
I especially enjoyed the level system as well as the champion system.
Level system makes you feel good by farming everything and champion system makes the game harder and more rewarding.
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5 of 9 people (56%) found this review helpful
1.3 hrs on record
Posted: June 25
I've only just started playing this game, and i must say i'm rather impressed, at first i found the game akin to The Binding of Isaac, with it's top down veiw, similar movement and attacking controls, and items that boost your stats. that being said it has one thing that sets it apart from it's counterpart, the fact that it is trying and succeeding to a point, at being more focused on the macabre, the dark corridors, the clunky but managable controls all bring about a very solid and cohesive gaming experience. while not exactly horror, to say it didn't scare me would be true, but it falls into a similar catagory of being a game of melancholy. it's an game worth picking up, that's for certain.
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1 of 2 people (50%) found this review helpful
13.7 hrs on record
Posted: August 26
This review is also available (with pictures!) on my personal blog. I double-reviewed it with Costume Quest, so just scroll down a bit if Tim Schafer's stuff doesn't interest you.
Link: http://azerothtozork.blogspot.com/2014/08/normal-0-false-false-false-en-us-x-none.html

Our Darker Purpose is a top-down action roguelike with light RPG elements and a deliciously dark, gothic set of sensibilities. The game has bits of “The Binding of Isaac” and “Don’t Starve” in its family tree. The humor and art owe a bit to Tim Burton and a great deal to Edward Gory.

Movement and combat is in the classic twin-stick style. You comb a floor of randomly laid out rooms for useful items and the chamber of the boss guarding the way forward. Each time you enter a room you’re locked in until you’ve cleared all enemies or overcome some other hazard, so you can’t just rush through.

ODP is set in a towering, Victorian, half boarding school, half orphanage called Edgewood. The school is a nightmare Hogwarts, teaming with darkly comic fates for poorly behaved or unwary students and ruled by an unseen but amusingly malevolent administrator. The bits of lore and narrative slowly unlocked through play are gothic black-humor at their finest.

You play as Cordy, an adorably pale waif with a permanent expression of bemused worry. When the faculty and staff of Edgewood abruptly vanish Cordy barely survives the purge of the small, weak, awkward, and unpopular children that immediately follows. With nothing to lose and nowhere to go but up she sets out for the top floor of the building, searching for answers and a way out. Provided she can survive the savage gangs of fellow children that have formed in the absence of adult supervision and the stranger things scuttling in the shadows and crawling across the chalkboards of the darkened school.

Fortunately Cordy has inexplicably developed the ability to hurl small darts of flame to defend herself. While Cordy can only hurl flame in the four cardinal directions she can move and shoot independently. An extremely limited number of chalk-bombs and an evasive roll (crucial to avoiding damage) round out her modest set of starting abilities.

Early attempts to ascend Edgewood invariably end in failure and death, a fact the game itself is quick to tell you to expect. Indeed it’s not mechanically possible to clear ODP on your first playthrough. Overcoming a major boss for the first time advances the narrative and adds a new set of variables to the game, but also ends that particular run. Like all true roguelikes ODP is intended to be played many, many times before completion.

Edgewood is a stark, relentlessly hostile environment. Healing juice-boxes, money, and other useful items are in short supply and invariably guarded. Attrition as much as anything else usually ends a run. Learning the attack patterns of the various inhabitants and hazards is critical to long term progress. Finishing a floor without taking damage is an accomplishment to be lauded.

ODP is highly challenging and carless play will end a run in short order. Each attempt does help you slowly unlock new items to be found and build up a modest set of permanent bonuses. This helps create a sense of progression and that your efforts are being rewarded, even as you die time and time again.

While primarily an action game ODP does manage to offer meaningful character development choices and interesting items. Each level-up offers two randomly selected but sizable stat upgrades. Some options include penalties still worth considering, like a permanently slower move speed in exchange for a large chunk of cash.

Many of the items that can be scavenged from Edgewood’s chambers change Cordy in fundamental ways, like giving a massive boost to attack rate while making her formerly accurate shots spray out in a random arc. Some of the most powerful bits of gear break after you absorb a certain amount of damage (as if you needed another reason to dodge), while others require completing difficult challenges to unlock their power.

Of course there’s no guarantee you’ll be offered useful items or upgrades, and everything is lost when you die anyway. This is normal for Roguelikes, but it can still be frustrating when bad luck dooms an otherwise promising run. The game’s other chief sin (significantly harder to forgive) is that creature hit-boxes don’t always match up with their models. While the game is two dimensional the “camera” is implied to be at a slight angle, meaning shots often pass behind an enemy’s head.

Reasons to play: Deliciously dark, gothic humor and art. Challenging twin-stick style gameplay. Meaningful progression from run to run.

Reasons to pass: Very high difficulty level. Slightly miss-leading hit-boxes.
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2 of 4 people (50%) found this review helpful
64.8 hrs on record
Posted: July 31
Good binding of issac type game. Roll mechanic adds a new layer to the core gameplay. Massive replayability. Game is fairly difficult. Overall, worth a purchase.
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2 of 4 people (50%) found this review helpful
6.2 hrs on record
Posted: July 21
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FL8ZyNK4nMs
Our Darker Purpose is a Rogue-lite game done with a strong bite in its difficulty. It holds its theme well as its art style and atmosphere fit all together as the levels ups and items are well placed and balanced. Its not a game for people new to Rogue-lites as it will chew you up and spit you out, why spit you out because your not good enough to be in its belly. For more reviews be sure to check out the channel here http://www.youtube.com/user/SocioPyscho

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1 of 3 people (33%) found this review helpful
3.5 hrs on record
Posted: August 23
This Game is so much fun :D Really hard but still super fun to play
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5 of 12 people (42%) found this review helpful
4.2 hrs on record
Posted: May 28
Every now and a again a game comes along that is so unique that it redefines the genre. This is not one of those games, but it is pretty fun and worth a try if you liked The Binding of Isaac. If you haven't played The Binding of Isaac, play that instead.
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0 of 2 people (0%) found this review helpful
10.5 hrs on record
Posted: May 24
Imagine if you got Tim Burton to write the premise of a Binding of Isaac-type game, and then had dearly departed illustrator Edward Gorey do the visuals. Then imagine it was fiendishly difficult, cleverly based on King Lear, and had rooms that weren't locked into one shape and size like in BoI. Pretty cool, right?
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0 of 3 people (0%) found this review helpful
3.7 hrs on record
Posted: August 6
This game tries to similar to Binding of Isaac. The setting and art style is unique (Harry Potter vs. Tim Burton) and there are many rewards and unlockables.

Everything is fine except the most important part: gameplay. Playing is just no fun, really slow even when rolling. That kills an action game for me. Player movement and shot frequency should be doubled from the beginning.

As in BoI optimizing the character means backtracking the level -> even more slow creeping around.
I wanted to see the unlockables and the higher level rewards but it feels like work not playing.
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0 of 3 people (0%) found this review helpful
3.3 hrs on record
Posted: June 29
In It's current state ODP is slightly lack-luster in terms of balance, sure the roguelikey design does encourage unfair gameplay but while this can be used to create a more engaging game this game takes it much farther then is appreciated.
Difficulty is often conducive to engagement in a game where it is implimented well, it allows the feeling of immense satisfaction when the player eventually overcomes the obstacles that once held them back so much, however with bad implimentation as is the case in Isaac and sadly ODP as well.
ODP does greatly depend on luck for pickups and such, luck varies less than in Isaac howver that is simply because the game does not have any memorable or standalone powerful items.
The hitboxes are incredibly unfinished with player hitboxes being larger then they graphically appear and for some stupid reason circular items have square hitboxes, in summnation the game is very, very unfinished but it is very promising.

As of yet I do not reccommend it
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1 of 6 people (17%) found this review helpful
2.3 hrs on record
Posted: July 19
It's Binding of Isaac, only more unforgiving.
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