Journey to the dark heart of the Edgewood Home for Lost Children in this fiendishly difficult action RPG! When her teacher stepped out of the classroom a month ago, Cordy never imagined he would be gone for good. Now her fellow students have turned on each other as the school descends into chaos.
User reviews: Very Positive (470 reviews) - 82% of the 470 user reviews for this game are positive.
Release Date: Jan 29, 2014

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Recommended By Curators

"Similar to Binding of Issac but with a few differences, and in a beautifully drawn Gothic style. Just good ole dungeon exploring and monster fighting."

Recent updates View all (15)

October 10

New Experimental Patch (v516)

Hi everyone,

Pushed through some more bug fixes from last experimental build. Please let us know if any of these don't appear to be working!

  • Archivists should now drop all item types
  • Buying on-use items at vending machines should once again make current on-use item appear on the ground
  • Steam achievements should work again (previous achievements should carry over retroactively when you go into the stats page)
  • Save functionality reverted - can only save on Level Select now
  • Dying on Hard Mode Imaginaries should reset movement speed
  • Controls for on-use items and chalk should no longer overlap

15 comments Read more

September 3

New Experimental Patch (v513)

Hi everyone!

The quality of life at Edgewood is about to get (marginally) more bearable for its downtrodden residents. We'd welcome any help in testing the latest test/experimental patch (v513), accessible through the 'Betas' tab within Steam -> Our Darker Purpose properties.

NOTE: If you already have an in-progress run, resuming the run seems to cause strange doubled pause/option menus. Restarting after your next run should fix this. Please let us know if it is a persistent issue!


  • Added ability to save and exit mid-game (not just at level select)
  • Added numerous instructions everywhere (how to buy at vending machine, etc.)
  • Added ability to remap gamepad (and overall keymapping interface/default controls)
  • Added display options for timers for floor and overall run
  • Added confirmation windows to new game / deleting of progress
  • Revamped sound control UI
  • Added handful of sound effects
  • Fixed few graphical glitches (challenge chests removed from map, friendly dog now has a shadow)
  • General optimizations to enhance game start-up time and FPS
  • Reduced ability to "stick" against doors
  • Increased warning time before The Frozen Few attacks
  • Revamped Cyndar's Timekeeper fight (gear speed, time bubbles)
  • The Virtuoso's chair should no longer move during pauses
  • Expanded interact range for chests and memory room objects
  • Changed electricity from Van Der Graff to light blue
  • Fixed My Manuscript! from locking out your attacks (hopefully for the last time)
  • Fixed Stolen Seconds cooldown display glitch
  • Reduced vending machine price for a few items (e.g., Escher's Compass)

24 comments Read more


“A challenging and beautiful foray into the genre.”
8.75 – Game Informer

About This Game

Journey to the dark heart of the Edgewood Home for Lost Children in this fiendishly difficult action RPG!

When her teacher stepped out of the classroom a month ago, Cordy never imagined he would be gone for good. Now her fellow students have turned on each other as the school descends into chaos. Cordy must battle feral classmates and dangerous creatures as she ascends to the cruel Administrators’ offices atop the Edgewood Home for Lost Children.

Our Darker Purpose is a top-down, rogue-like action RPG that combines the ingenuity of genre-defining classics with the expansiveness and accessibility of modern day action adventure games. The gameplay is steeped in a variety of influences ranging from A Link to the Past to The Binding of Isaac to Diablo. We love games with great mechanics and awesome, bizarre storylines, and that’s what we’re creating with Our Darker Purpose.

Each playthrough features a unique set of procedurally generated levels. Death is permanent, but your accomplishments earn you resources to buy lesson and upgrades in the afterlife... and your education lasts forever. Every game teaches you more about the Edgewood Home for Lost Children, the disappearance of the adults, and the darker purpose of the Administrators.

Key Features

Fast-Paced, Combat-Oriented Gameplay: Face unique boss encounters and challenging enemy mechanics! The Edgewood Home is a merciless environment. Dodge between fireballs and flying desks while your former classmates try to pummel you into the walls, and that’s just the lower levels…

Character Variety and Customization: Assemble selections of randomized perks and upgrades to reflect your play-style – tanky bruiser, glass cannon, fleet-footed assassin, or anything else. Assemble your skills into devastating combinations… or pick style perks with no benefit at all, at your peril.

Oh Yeah, and It Takes Place in a Sinister Orphanage: Prepare for a an unflinching look at what happens when an already terrifying boarding school/orphanage goes all Lord of the Flies, and try not to get eaten by any of the possessed furniture. Only the psychologically strongest gamers will be able to withstand the insightful taunts of the Administrators themselves…


Allocate precious skills

Uncovering Edgewood’s dark secrets will yield valuable experience for Cordy. Each time she levels up, you’ll be able to select from one of two new abilities that she can acquire, depending on your play style and the situation at hand. You will never be as strong as you need to be, so prepare for some nail-biting choices…

Choose your own ghastly fate

The house is different every game, and every level is uniquely generated. But fear not, there’s more than one way to ascend through a dystopic Victorian manor! Pick your route – would you rather battle a feral horde than risk an encounter with the dangerous Capulets? The choice is yours! Of course, each floor offers unique credit tokens to buy new upgrades, so choose wisely…

Acquire eternal powers

Adorable, creepy, stylized Edgewood Home students don’t give up when they fail --- they go to class. Each time you lead Cordy to a fiery (or chalky, or spikey, or venomy, or monstery) demise, you get some time to strategize with your kindly scarecrow guidance counselor. He is happy to offer his one-of-a-kind insight in many academic disciplines…

System Requirements

    • OS: Windows Vista/7
    • Processor: 1.6 Ghz
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: X1950 Pro, 7900 GT
    • DirectX: Version 10
    • Storage: 300 MB available space
Helpful customer reviews
10 of 11 people (91%) found this review helpful
2.2 hrs on record
Posted: October 10
I love The Binding of Isaac. I love roguelikes, I love twin-stick shooters, and I love that bizarre crossing of dark and cute. I mention this because it's impossible to review Our Darker Purpose without bringing up BoI at almost every turn. The gameplay, the progression, the enemies, the items, even the aesthetic are all heavily informed by Isaac, and while there are some interesting tweaks to the formula, they come at a cost.

ODP poses you as a wayward resident at the Edgewood Home for Lost Children, a mix of orphanage, asylum, and Hogwarts. Within its randomly-generated halls you will meet all manner of disturbed students, monstrous school supplies, and debris. While the first two are interesting and varied in their Tim Burntony designs, the debris and traps are the only features of the rooms, lending them much less variety than the maps in Binding. Levels themselves can have random attributes, though, like lower light (+light radius is a thing again!), extra healing items, or more damage.

Items can be found in rare chests, from defeating rare minibosses, or buying them from vending machines. They come far less frequently than BoI items and have far smaller effects on gameplay, usually providing a random chance for an effect or a very corner case bonus. Your main method of progression is earning EXP from kills, leveling up, and picking one perk from a randomized pair. The game definitely has a stronger RPG vibe than you-know-what, with full stats for your character, critical hits, dodge chance, and so on. It adds a bit of complexity but also dilutes some of the raw appeal of combat and simple progression.

Hopefully by now you're recognizing the trend that Our Darker Purpose follows. Everything it does in deference to Binding of Isaac is done in half-measures, never quite meeting the quality of the originator. The look is interesting and more detailed, but lacks weight and impact. The progression is more complex, but never gets as creative. The sound design is also rather off, reusing many effects and missing some key feedback cues. Worst of all, though, is the uneven difficulty. Some rooms and bosses will just absolutely wreck you in ways the progression may not account for, ending otherwise promising runs in pretty sour ways. There's an overarching progression system with more perks to unlock, but it looks to take ages to get anything particularly interesting, if it even exists.

It's not a bad game by any stretch, just one that never lives up to the example set for it. If you've burned out on Binding of Isaac it's worth a try, and fans of the look or the RPG progression may even find it more engrossing.
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6 of 6 people (100%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
41.0 hrs on record
Posted: October 13
This is my 1st review and I am not use to writing anything online so if there are any problems please kindly let me know.

Playtime is very wrong, while steam says 35 hours, I have played over 150 hours.
A great game with a lot of replayability.

The gameplay is very nice and it can be very hard at times. Enemies are grouped in factions, each faction has it own theme, appearance and they play differently from one and another. The each faction is harder then the last, the final faction can be very difficult to fight. The bosses are also unqiue, there is only two bosses that are similar. Most boss fights are fun and hard, only some are annoying. The levels also impact the game, the level are just as different as the factions.

The music for the game is amazing. Each theme go greaty with it's faction or boss. The music makes the game even more fun and it also make some bosses feel more challenging .

The game also has a nice story and lore. There is no voice acting, the story is all text base but should not be a problem for most. Most of the story need to be discovered and most of the story is left to the player to interpret.

The art is very good. I like how they made it look hand draw. It has a story book feel to it. The art is dark but not gory which suit the game. The final faction look great and very unqiue.

Gameplay: 9/10
Music: 10/10
Final Score 10/10
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6 of 7 people (86%) found this review helpful
28.0 hrs on record
Posted: July 10
tl;dr: It's Binding of Isaac as a girl. If you liked Binding of Isaac, you'll like this game.

It's obvious -- an overhead, oldschool Zelda-inspired, 4-directional dual-stick shooter in which you play as a hapless, ambiguously 'innocent' child in a dark, gothic setting, moving from floor to floor collecting powerups and fighting huge, challenging bosses in a rogulike gameplay shell. Yep, it's Binding of Isaac. But not exactly.

First of all, the little aesthetic differences on the surface; to start off with, you play as a girl (though one could argue you can technically play as a "girl" in BoI, and this game's Cordy looks kinda like Eve, but that's besides the point). And instead of tears, you shoot fireballs. And instead of going down an increasingly surreal basement, you go up an increasingly surreal schoolhouse / orphanage. And instead of vicious, freakish abominations of nature, you fight vicious, freakish orphaned children (and eventually abominations of nature). Yeah, really similar stuff... though overall ODP has a slightly less cartoonish, more Tim Burton-esque gothic style to it, which depending on your tastes may look a lot better than BoI's, and it's at least marginally "classier", with a LOT less bodily fluids and toilet humor, though its share of less-than-prudish bits here and there; it's more on the "somewhat unsettling/disturbing, but kind of cool" level than the "gross-out until you get used to it and just laugh the rest of the way" level BoI sits on.

But what about the gameplay? Well, it is indeed EXTREMELY similar to Isaac, but with a few fundamental differences. The biggest ones are:
A) an experience/levelling system, which guarantees at least semi-regular increases in power comparable to a useful passive item upgrade, especially if you're one of those players like me who insists on clearing every single room in every floor. This kind of replaces BoI's item rooms on each floor, though this is somewhat of a blessing since level-up bonuses are nearly ALWAYS good if not great.
B) a persistant upgrade system to make yourself or the world around you more geared for your success as you build up tokens earned by completing floors and getting achievements, which you can spend on either 'lessons' (passive effects you earn through achievements as well) or your 'guidance counselor' (which is basically a way to bank extra currency for gradual bonuses, similar to the coin bank in BoI in a way)
C) the ability to DODGE ROLL. You have no idea how good this is and how it changes the experience compared to BoI! Not only is it just a universally useful thing to have but it allows you to, say, take a slow movement-speed build and not be forced to tank countless hits from enemies/projectiles that are literally unavoidable without speed past a certain threshold like in BoI.

There are other smaller differences, like the fact you get to manually choose your next floor out of 2-4 choices and see the variables they have (kind of like curses in BoI but often with both positive and negative, or even outright positive, effects)... or the fact that instead of bombs which I say are of dubious quality anyway in BoI, you get chalk which is basically a very rare but very powerful utility that can be used both offensively and defensely. Also, as opposed to your regular bombable secret rooms, in this game they're rather obvious and easy to find and only occur once every few floors on average, anyway.

Aside from those points, it's more or less an identical game. But that's not a bad thing. Like so many great games of PC gaming past copied the original Rogue and created the genre we now know as roguelike, ODP copies Binding of Isaac which is this generation's most well-known and quite possibly well-made roguelike. And it is a great game. There's really no reason I can think of NOT to buy it if you like Isaac at all, or just action rpg/overhead shooter/roguelikes in a general sense. The graphics are unique and lovely, the music is atmospheric, the gameplay is tight and spot-on, and it never seems unfair, far less than Isaac.

I suppose if I had one criticism, it'd be that it's more 'subdued' than BoI... besides in an aethetic sense as mentioned earlier, there are definitely far less ways to make your character / shots nearly as 'wild' or unique as you can in Isaac, and it's basically a matter of doing what you can to make them stronger, faster, have longer range, and add as many supplementary alternate 'bullets' as you can through various means. But since the game's designed and balanced around this less over-the-top style it's really not that big of a deal.
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4 of 4 people (100%) found this review helpful
28.3 hrs on record
Posted: June 14
I must admit, when I first heard about this game I imediately thought it was a Binding of Isaac clone. It has a similar structure, and a lot familiar feelings associated with it. However this game plays a lot differently to BoI. The story is interesting, and has me really interested to find out what will happen. The patterns of monsters are frustrating at first(like BoI) but you will eventually get the hand of it and when in critical danger you can roll to move away faster. That ability alone makes this game a lot different to BoI. All in all I would recommend this game to anyone who is a fan of roguelikes. The items are really neat to explore and use, and the lessons are a nice add-on, as well as the counselor system.
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3 of 3 people (100%) found this review helpful
53.4 hrs on record
Posted: October 31
Our Darker Purpose is a very addictive, fast paced, challenging game. It keeps you on your toes, becoming reckless in just a few rooms can ruin a great run. The challenges are a great added bonus difficulty to unlock perks that will help you ascend edgewood and defeat the schools hierarchy one floor at a time. The chalk like aesthetics of the game are much more stylized than that cliche flash looking game of similar style.

I'll be honest, even the lowly Brogs and Woundworts gave me trouble at first, but try after try I was easily making it to chapter 3 each time...which I'll admit I still haven't beaten the administrator.

There are a few bad corners to get caught up on, sometimes you almost feel cheated, or waiting for a bad run to turn good never happens, but it's still fun. Runs are long, but you can quit mid run and return where you left off if you only have time for quick sessions. Hit boxes can be wonkey, with the parallax view it's sometimes better to aim at the center of an enemy than at the base. I'd use a 3rd part controller config until they add one to the game, the default native controls are garbage.

Overall I'd pick it over BoI any day.
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