Hearts of Iron III lets you play the most engaging conflict in world history, World War 2, on all fronts as any country and through multiple different scenarios. Guide your nation to glory between 1936 and 1948 and wage war, conduct diplomacy and build your industry in the most detailed World War 2 game ever made.
User reviews: Very Positive (1,550 reviews)
Release Date: Aug 7, 2009

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Packages that include this game

Buy Hearts of Iron Collection III (Jan 2014)

Includes 20 items: Hearts of Iron III, Hearts of Iron III DLC: German II Spritepack , Hearts of Iron III Semper Fi: Dies Irae Götterdämmerung, Hearts of Iron III: Axis Minors Vehicle Pack, Hearts of Iron III: British Vehicle Spritepack, Hearts of Iron III: Dies Irae Stars & Stripes Spritepack, Hearts of Iron III: For the Motherland, Hearts of Iron III: German Infantry Pack DLC, Hearts of Iron III: Italian Vehicle Pack, Hearts of Iron III: Japanese Infantry Pack DLC, Hearts of Iron III: Japanese Vehicle Spritepack, Hearts of Iron III: Mega German Spritepack, Hearts of Iron III: Semper Fi, Hearts of Iron III: Sounds of Conflict, Hearts of Iron III: Soviet Infantry Pack DLC, Hearts of Iron III: Soviet Music Pack DLC, Hearts of Iron III: Soviet Pack DLC, Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour, Hearts of Iron III: US Infantry Sprite Pack, Hearts of Iron III: US Pack DLC

Buy Paradox Grand Strategy Collection

Includes 4 items: Crusader Kings II, Europa Universalis IV, Hearts of Iron III, Victoria II

Buy Hearts of Iron III: Semper Fi

Buy Hearts of Iron 3 DLC Collection

Includes 18 items: Hearts of Iron III DLC: German II Spritepack , Hearts of Iron III Semper Fi: Dies Irae Götterdämmerung, Hearts of Iron III: British Vehicle Spritepack, Hearts of Iron III: Dies Irae Stars & Stripes Spritepack, Hearts of Iron III: DLC - German Sprite Pack, Hearts of Iron III: For the Motherland, Hearts of Iron III: German Infantry Pack DLC, Hearts of Iron III: Japanese Infantry Pack DLC, Hearts of Iron III: Japanese Vehicle Spritepack, Hearts of Iron III: Mega German Spritepack, Hearts of Iron III: Semper Fi, Hearts of Iron III: Sounds of Conflict, Hearts of Iron III: Soviet Infantry Pack DLC, Hearts of Iron III: Soviet Music Pack DLC, Hearts of Iron III: Soviet Pack DLC, Hearts of Iron III: Their Finest Hour, Hearts of Iron III: US Infantry Sprite Pack, Hearts of Iron III: US Pack DLC

 

Recommended By Curators

"Hardcore historical strategy geeks, this game is for you. Be warned, though: it does not do any hand-holding."
Read the full review here.

Recent updates View all (10)

May 8

Hearts of Iron IV - Development Dirary #16 - World Tension



Happy V day everyone!

Let's celebrate that with another exciting Developmen Diary from podcat.

Hearts of Iron IV - Developer Diary 16 - World Tension

If you missed it, please note that the release date of Hearts of Iron IV has been delayed. (Read More)

Don't forget to register your copy of HoI3 on our official forums to gain access to user mods, technical support and much much more...

3 comments Read more

April 10

Hearts of Iron IV - Development Dirary #15 - On the High Seas



Podcat is back from the US and is eager to share his latest thoughts with you all!

Hearts of Iron IV - Development Dirary #15 - On the High Seas

3 comments Read more

Reviews

"offers a challenge to most strategy die-hards"

— Dreamstation
"Paradox has done a tremendous job of making this complex design relatively easy to get into."

— Gamespot
"With incredible flexibility, freedom, and depth, this is a history buffs dream and should not be passed up if you are a fan of the genre."

— PCgameworld
"Serious wargamers are in for a real treat as the hardcore franchise returns for another go at the world's most terrible war."

— Gamespy
"Featuring a fully integrated combat model, a wide range of strategic and diplomatic options for your country, and an intuitive AI system, Hearts of Iron III is shaping up to be the best game in the series yet."

— Strategy Informer

About This Game

Hearts of Iron III lets you play the most engaging conflict in world history, World War 2, on all fronts as any country and through multiple different scenarios. Guide your nation to glory between 1936 and 1948 and wage war, conduct diplomacy and build your industry in the most detailed World War 2 game ever made.
Features:
  • Play as any nation from 1936 to 1948, more than 150 countries to choose from.
  • Control the oceans with aircraft carriers, submarines and battleships and use your air force to defend your skies, support your naval and ground forces, and to bomb your enemies
  • Thousands of historically accurate real-world military commanders and politicians.
  • Realistic military command AI with unprecedented levels of interaction
  • In-depth diplomatic and political system.
  • Historical accuracy combined with an unparalleled level of freedom of choice
  • More than 10,000 land provinces makes the game five times more detailed than HoI2 and the most detailed depiction of World War 2 ever made.
  • Customize your divisions in detail with more than 20 types of brigades
  • New economic system makes it possible to buy weapons from abroad.
  • Mobilization and reserves gives the option of surprise attacks, Blitzkrieg made real.
  • Government-in-exile makes it possible to continue to struggle from abroad with underground movements and uprisings against the oppressing power.
  • Strategic warfare system makes it more important to defend the skies and oceans against foreign attacks; leaving cities open to enemy bombing will now be devastating.
  • A completely new intelligence system, with several types of intelligence sources, makes it possible to get information about enemy reserves and troop movements.
  • Assign troops to "theatres" on the map to fight two-front wars more successfully.
  • The new AI system and more detailed map will allow for more strategic decisions.
  • Flexible technology system with hundreds of categories, where major powers get their own unique attributes.

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
    • Operating System: Microsoft® Windows® 2000/XP/Vista
    • Processor: Intel Pentium IV 2.4 GHz or AMD 3500+
    • Memory: 2 GB of RAM
    • Hard Disk Space: 2 GB
    • Video Card: NVIDIA GeForce 8800 or ATI Radeon X1900 videocard
    • Sound: Direct X-compatible sound card
    • DirectX®: Direct X 9.0
    • OS: OS X 10.5.8 or higher
    • Processor: Any Intel CPU
    • Memory: 128 MB VRAM, 1GB RAM
    • Hard Disk Space: 1.3 GB hard disk space
    • Video Card: GeForce 7300, Radeon HD 2400 (GMA cards not supported)
    • Internet: Broadband connection for Internet play
    • Registration: Internet connection for registration
Helpful customer reviews
350 of 369 people (95%) found this review helpful
29 people found this review funny
139.1 hrs on record
Posted: December 30, 2014
It took many hours, 3 in game years and countless spies, but i got a nazi elected as the president of the U.S.
10/10
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
318 of 369 people (86%) found this review helpful
21 people found this review funny
1,485.1 hrs on record
Posted: December 22, 2014
Still not sure, i will play some more before i decide if it's good.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
259 of 321 people (81%) found this review helpful
277.5 hrs on record
Posted: December 7, 2014
I was a big fan of HOI2 and played it a lot. It had a good balance of playability and realism and there were some issues which needed fixing, such as convoys and the occasionally flaky AI but it was a good game.

HOI3, sadly, is not. It has taken me a while to work out why, but I think it's because, in trying to make it a complete war simulation, the developers have failed to either make it accurate or make it fun. The accuracy claim sounds harsh, so let me explain.

1 - Research. There's no logic to it. One has to seperately research the gun carriages and weapons for anti-tank guns, for anti-aircraft guns, and artillery. That's six separate thingies to research. Then there's a seventh bit for heavy AA for your provinces.
Now in reality, what happened was that the best anti-tank weapons (British 17pdr, German 88, American 3") all started life as AA guns. It would make far more sense to have a 'foundry' option where guns could be researched and then applied to different areas.
Why even force people to research three lots of gun carriages? It makes absolutely no sense.

The same applies to separate research for cavalry weapons, militia weapons, and infantry weapons. What, we're all using different rifles now?

As a minor aside let me come on to the logic behind the naming of each progressive unit. For example, the British medium tank starts as the A9 cruiser, then when you research 1940 tanks it becomes the A15 Crusader (skipping the A13), then for 1942 tanks it becomes the Sherman Firefly. What? No Cromwell? Why the Firefly? This isn't the only case of a total lack of logic in the choice of naming. The naming doesn't affect the game but for a game which boasts of its realistic nature it is totally out of place.

IMO the complexity of the research tree does NOT add anything to the game. I think it could have been halved in size and been far more enjoyable to use without losing any gameplay.


2 - Convoys. The problem with convoys is that there is no mechanism to manage their routes. This was a problem in HOI2 where the German AI could sink the entire British convoy fleet by hanging around in a few areas of the North Sea and continually sinking ships. The very least HOI3 should have had is a convoy management system. The player should be able to tell the convoy routing system NOT TO SAIL through certain areas. Instead I have to watch convoys being sunk in the middle of the North Sea and around the English Channel, instead of rerouting all my convoys to the NW coast of Scotland or Liverpool and Belfast (as was done historically). It's a huge oversight and it is one of the primary problems with playing as the British. One of the other problems is that the cost of both convoys and escorts is fixed and does not fall over time (as it did historically with Liberty Ships and corvettes). It's almost as though the game is written solely with land combat in mind and about 3/4 of the way through someone said "Hey, wasn't there someone else in WW2 beside Germany and Russia?"

It's a real problem and affects playability and the prospect of a historical outcome to WW2.

3. Naval AI. While I'm on the subject, the AI doesn't seem to know what to do with its ships. The Germans send their battleships out unescorted to hang around the west coast of England and get sunk. Which they do. A lot. It makes me suspect that the major emphasis for the game was on land combat and naval was not addressed properly.

4. Allies. In HOI2 getting allies to fight for or with you was easy. They often sent you units, and there was an option for you to take over their entire armed forces. In HOI3 that option doesn't exist. And they don't send you units. You have to 'set objectives' to get the allies to work with you. These objectives don't really work. So, when playing as Britain, Canada keeps its air force and navy and army in Canada. When you urgently need Canadian fighters to defend your airspace and Canadian destroyers to patrol the Atlantic, they won't budge. There is no way to unify command, so you don't fight as allies but merely as participants in a global war where you aren't fighting each other. It's poor.


5. Crashes. Oh my goodness, the game's unreliability is terrible. It crashes to desktop the whole time. To minimise the inconvenience of losing my game progress I set it to autosave every game week, which is the most frequent autosave setting. However, if you are in the middle of a huge amount of preparation for your forces (reorganising your divisions for example) the game might crash. This has happened a couple of times to me, where I've been playing as Soviets and have been engaged in a major reorganisation of my 300+ divisions, and the game has just crashed to the desktop, and of course the autosave hasn't kicked in because I'm not progressing time through the game. HOI2 never did this, and it's by far the most infuriating feature of the game.

6. Graphics and Interface. It's cluttered and it's illogical and it's poorly laid out and it's not designed to work on higher resolution settings. It's a bloody mess. And let's talk about the little pictures for each unit that appears in the research window and the production window. Apparently it was too much effort for the devs to dig out the pictures of the units that they used in HOI2. As a result far too many units, which had the correct photo in the previous game, have a 'stock' photo in this game.


There are historical oddities, too, ones which ought to have stood out like a sore thumb. It is now possible to build (assuming you have the IC) lots of provincial AA without expending any manpower. Who's manning all those guns? Historically Nazi Germany had to commit a million men to defending their homeland from bombers, and that was a drain on manpower. In HOI3, they don't have to. They had to in HOI2.

I could live with the game if it was new. If it had been out for a couple of months I'd say "Well, every game ships with bugs so I can live with it for now." But this isn't a new game, it's been out for years, and instead of fixing the very serious reliability bugs, and instead of sticking in a few dozen stock photos, Paradox decided that an urgent priority was some 3D counters which they could charge extra money for. It's not good enough.

I can't recommend this game. If it was claiming to be a beer-and-crisps wargame I could overlook its historical inaccuracy. It's claiming to be a very accurate game, and it isn't. It's not accurate enough for a historical wargame, it's not fun enough for a 'quick dip in and have some fun' wargame. It's too unreliable to be any kind of game at all.


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62 of 63 people (98%) found this review helpful
17 people found this review funny
194.1 hrs on record
Posted: January 24
>Plays as Germany
>Makes plans for world domination
>annex Austria and czechoslovakia
>attacks and annexes polan
>Norway Declares war
>laughs
>Allies declare war
>Sends all men to western front
>Norway invades through denmark and kills my units their
>Oh ♥♥♥♥ nigr.jpg
>Norway with their one regiment pushes through germany and takes over berlin
>gets annexed

10/10
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83 of 96 people (86%) found this review helpful
7 people found this review funny
126.3 hrs on record
Posted: January 20
Step 1. Play as Luxembourg
Step 2. Wait 3 years
Step 3. ???
Step 4. Profit.

10/10 would be forcibly painted grey again.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
64 of 70 people (91%) found this review helpful
6 people found this review funny
11.0 hrs on record
Posted: December 15, 2014
I like it. Now how the hell do I play it?
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
63 of 69 people (91%) found this review helpful
11 people found this review funny
56.3 hrs on record
Posted: November 29, 2014
Chose Haiti
Spent 103 turns building an infantry
realize if I sell all my natural resources I can buy a tank from portugal
Join the Axis
Used unprecedented military strength to overrun the ♥♥♥♥♥♥♥s in the Dominican Republic
Annexed by the US

9/10 would see the rise of the Haitian warmachine again
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
42 of 43 people (98%) found this review helpful
3 people found this review funny
171.5 hrs on record
Posted: December 17, 2014
Decided to make Poland stronk and stop German invasion in 1939. Needed more IC so invaded Romania and Bulgaria. Made the smart decision to become Communist and hopefully get help from Soviet Union to stop the germans. By 39 I still wasn't totally ready, so when Germany demanded Danzig, I gave it away. 2 months later I was ready, and waited for the invasion that never came. Germany invaded France, and I saw a gold opportunity to attack while they were occupied. Invaded Germany, but Slovakia and Hungary were able to hold me until Germany was ready to counter-attack. The Germans came and handed my ♥♥♥ to me, while the Soviets only watched from a distance.

11/10 Would feel betrayed by the Soviets that never helped me, again.
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19 of 19 people (100%) found this review helpful
4 people found this review funny
26.3 hrs on record
Posted: February 2
Playing as Germany I decided to take my cores back from Lithuania instead of attacking Belgium. France and the UK didn't let it slide. France gets smashed into pieces, Italy actually does something good and helps and I declare war on the Spanish non-nazis.

2 years later, everyone in Western Europe is Nazi, Spain is split between the uncompromissed Nazis and the compromised Nazis while we're beating the ♥♥♥♥ out of the Communists.

Or at least that's what my newspapers are printing in Berlin while the Russian empire is just 100 km away.
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11 of 11 people (100%) found this review helpful
18.3 hrs on record
Posted: April 30
Hearts of Iron III is an excellent game. It allows the player to control any nation in the lead-up to WW2, or during it if you prefer. These range from Nazi Germany, of course, to the Dominican Republic, which gives you an idea of the level of choice on offer. The game essentially drops you into the world as head-of-state of one of these many nations, and it's entirely up to you what to do from there: will you align with the Axis in Europe to gain your share of the economic gains in the upcoming war? Or will you side with Stalin's Russia and work to undermine Fascism and the Allies, in an attempt to dominate the world with Communism?

However, the level of historical accuracy in HOI3 is astounding, despite the player's ability to make independent and alternate choices. For example, there is a system of "decisions" in the game which often provide some sort of benefit, one of which is the historical Anschluss of Austria for Germany. As well as this, there are literally thousands of officers, with their own traits and skill levels (which can be improved with combat), to assign to command your divisions or brigades. These are just two examples in an intricate web of historical detail. WW2 history buffs like myself will be elated at the opportunity to not only, for example, command Rommel's Afrika Korps, but lead it to complete victory in the Middle East! Again, this is just an example that popped into my head, the level of possibility is insane.

Aside from the military aspect of the game, which is the focus, there are various other sectors of your nation that you can alter control. There is the politics tab, where you select your ministers and make policies, as well as administer the areas that have come under your occupation through war. There is the diplomacy tab, where, if you are a leader of a faction, such as the Axis, you can influence nations to join you in alliance, and make trade deals, sell equipment, declare war, ETC. Other tabs include research, production, intelligence. I won't go into detail on these, but all are as important as each other.

Pro´s
+ Insanely high level of historical detail (accurate divisional names, commanders, ministers in governments, literally tens of thousands of provinces)
+ Ability to relive or rewrite history, in your own unique way.
+ Greatly immersive, you get to the point where hours just slip away in what feels like minutes!
+ Huge scale wars, on land sea, and air, where you are the commander in chief.

CONS
- Not recommended if the player is looking for amazing graphics- the gameplay is what sells HOI3, not the visuals.
- A tad buggy. The game crashes relatively frequently, especially if tinkering around in console commands.
- Steep learning curve, but once you get the full hang of it, you'll realise it was well worth the time put into it.

Overall rating: 12/15 (Great!)
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13 of 15 people (87%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
694.5 hrs on record
Posted: December 31, 2014
637 hours playing the vanilla game, im only just looking at the mods now. The best game I have ever played.
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6 of 6 people (100%) found this review helpful
3 people found this review funny
270.0 hrs on record
Posted: January 17
Played with Poland. Didn't die until 1940. Forgot to autosave, game crashed. Now I'm mad at the game, and I can't find the remaining parts of my mouse.
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7 of 8 people (88%) found this review helpful
44.5 hrs on record
Posted: January 1
It's a really good strategy game and i like the political elements.
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7 of 9 people (78%) found this review helpful
633.3 hrs on record
Posted: November 30, 2014
So this game has 4 titles, The base Game, Hearts of iron 3, the DLC "Semper Fi" the DLC "For the motherland" and the last DLC: "Their Finest hour" released in that order specifically, I'll just review Their finest hour for the time being.

Hearts of Iron, their Finest hour
So in hearts of iron 3 you assume complete control of a country from 1936-1948, Lead your nation through the second world war, you can play from Costa Rica to The United Kingdom in this Strategy game that takes place in one of the bloodiest conflicts in human history, with several scenarios to play through, from the Winter War to Operation Unthinkable, you're going to have quite the time playing the game.

So basically the game is a Grand Strategy Game, like most of Paradox Interactive's titles, this game however focuses not on colonization but complete domination and Victory against the Enemy.
And Like all of Paradox interactive's games, this one can become very chaotic really fast, play as the Soviet Union and Spread your Ideology to the European nations sick with Capitalism, play as Nazi Germany and destroy Communism and Democracy, play as The United States of America and Nuke everything that moves, the game is yours.
However, this game is very restrictive, whereas Victoria 2 had war justifications to declare it, in this you need zero neutrality, something that is nearly impossible to do due to the system, however modding and cheats allow for a more free play.
Also small nations' games usually are quite boring, whilst FTM fixed the neutrality system somewhat and gave small nations the ability to lower their neutrality to the point of joining a faction easier, the system is still somewhat broken.
However smaller nations' games are still fun, once I do recall a Haiti game where I joined the Allies, invaded Northern Brazil when they were Axis, and after they were annexed by Argentina, I was able to keep a small strip of land in Brazil as a reward, all this without modding or cheats, however it was 1953 by the time that happened, so almost 20 in-game years since the game started.
The game is much better to be played as a larger power though, then at least you have a chance to grow much larger armies and much better weapons, for example a France Playthrough would be much better than, say, a Liberia or El Salvador Playthrough, simply due to mechanics.
The game has some issues, for example TFH takes 5 minutes of loading to start up, this is especially annoying when I'm modding and have to exit the game to open the files up and edit the saves to make Haiti a nuclear, technological, economic, and military superpower, also the game won't allow you to exit to the desktop and return to the game without having to shut it down and start the game up again so that's a bother.
How is it as a strategy game? Pretty damn good
For example, Tanks will be ♥♥♥♥ in mountains and thus move and attack worse when positioned/traveling through them, but trusty mountain troops on the other hand are great at that stuff, but mounties are crap against tanks on an open field, unless they have back up or the tanks they face are technologically backwards and the mounties' country did some fine research on Infantry Anti-Tank weapons, but nevermind! The tanks are cut off thanks to the quick work of the brave Calvary units, now the mounties are on the offensive!
There's also combat width, unit weight for transporting across the seas, and even morale, organization, and attack levels of units, there's paratroopers, V2 missiles, V2 Interceptors, Battleships, Super heavy battleships, light tanks, heavy tanks, super heavy tanks, super duper heavy tanks (I kid), Armored cars, submarines, Carriers, Military Police, Naval, Tactical, and strategic bombers, and nuclear weapons.
Back to the game, you can also assign Units to AI HQs who will then move on the impulse of what the AI thinks is good to do.
You can assign wargoals after/during the declaration of war, and once a country's national unity is lower than the amount of its important cities are taken, it will surrender, for example if Poland braves Germany and invades them by sea, nuking Berlin thrice in the process, and Germany loses a lot of important cities to the Poles, Germany will surrender once the percent of important cities taken are more than the German national unity, which would be low due to all that nuking.
Unlike Victoria 2 or other Paradox titles, games go by not by days but by hours, making 10 years in HOI3 seem like 50 in Vic2, games are usually longer than the 1948 end and sometimes require going into the files and making the game end in 2005 or whenever, just to see how ♥♥♥♥ed up the world can get, if Japan ever annexes Australia, if Ireland ever conquers Germany, if Haiti ever nukes Hiroshima.
Along with this, there are in-game events that occur that mirror historical ones, like the Crashing of the Hindenburg, the loss of Amelia Earhart at sea, the final construction of the Pentagon, the White Death during the Winter war, the first atomic bomb dropped on another nation, and so on.
If you've played other Paradox games and wanna try your hand at conquering rather than colonizing, try out Hearts of Iron 3, you'll enjoy it.
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10 of 15 people (67%) found this review helpful
4.1 hrs on record
Posted: December 27, 2014
Game has a very bad habit of crashing just as it gets interesting. Also found saves corrupting. Graphics glitching out very often and some game mechanics that are incorrectly labeled. The AI controls are also insanely broken requiring the player to essentially micromanage everything... which lets face it, if you're going to have to resort to that you might as well play AoD or DH for HOI2.

I hope HOI4 surparses this in every possible way. Using EU4 for its base is a very good thing I feel. HOI3 doesn't work because it inherits a lot of really bad problems from EUIII whilst not featuring any of the benefits that were brought in Vicky 2. Its a period from paradox matched up with blunders like EU:Rome (which suffers from very similar bugs and crashes).

The political system can also be infuriating at times to make work. Its not easy enough to change governments the way it was like in HOI2. It suffers the same problems that Vicky2's political system suffers from- though at least it doesn't require revolutions to trigger it which is a plus.. but I hate the fact that democracies are so painfully difficult to change affiliations. This game needed Vicky2's Opinion changing focuses so that you could push a country to a particular ideology.

HOI4 ideally will have less reliance on AI, more reliance on good mechanic and UI design. HOI3 just feels lazy. Its fun, but nothing is explained well in game, you have to rely on wikis to figure out what the heck is going on half the time. The diplomacy system is also an after thought. Its only used for Neutral countries, and the AI just flatout doesn't even use it half the damn time.
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29 of 52 people (56%) found this review helpful
218.0 hrs on record
Posted: December 6, 2014
I ask you to read this before you downvote it.
The reason I feel this game sucks is because it is not an imporvement on previous games, in fact, it takes a lot away that the other games had. Sure HoI III has pretty graphics and some overpriced Unit packs....but come on, is that really all you care about?

Hearts of Iron III lacks most key events for WWII, as in barely any events are in the game. They try to justify this by saying its supposed to be a 'sandbox' even though that doesn't make any sense. First off; they are perfectly capable of writing up branching event paths that allow for alternative history like they did for the previous games in the series. This seems like an attempt to appeal to a new audiance that failed horribly.

Among the events missing are some of the most important to include, like the aftermath of WWII! In addition there are missing mechancs like land trading and claiming that are absent from this game that are badly needed, there is also a lack of nations and alternative nations and ministers in the game too. And don't even get me started on the map. They also removed a lot of key bookmarks that are present in other games.

The few features that are new or improved are poorly implimented or completely broken.

I recommend you wait to see if HoI IV is any better or buy Darkest Hour.
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4 of 4 people (100%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
426.7 hrs on record
Posted: February 4
If you're the kind of conqueror and think of dominating the whole world this game is what you were looking for. You dont have to follow history, actually you can change it. But i should warn you that you will be feeling frustrated in the firts gameplays like as Hitler... oh not the real one. This one below:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R6JFPJKf4AE

Despite its complexity its a great game, after you learned the basics of combat, industry, techs and how to build a division correctly you will be fine and can even conquer the world as Luxemburg, Albania or another tiny country.
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7 of 10 people (70%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
326.6 hrs on record
Posted: January 24
^ I don't like it
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3 of 3 people (100%) found this review helpful
24.5 hrs on record
Posted: March 2
I am just getting into this game myself so I will keep it simple. What do you think of the following generals (1 admiral)?
Omar Bradley, Charles DeGaulle, Heinz Guderian, Ivan Konev, William Slim, and Isoroku Yamamoto.
Were they under-rated?
If you said "yes" to at least three of them then this is your WWII game.
And after buying any Paradox game use your key code to register your game on their forum. It is not uncommon to pay $20.00 or more for strategy guides for other publishers' games. All e-manuals and e-guides are free once your Paradox game is registered. And the forums are very helpful in their own right.
In most transactions my relationship with the seller ended with the purchase. With Paradox it was just the beginning.
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3 of 3 people (100%) found this review helpful
3.9 hrs on record
Posted: December 31, 2014
I don't many(or any at all) hours logged into the steam version yet, but I've put about 6 hours into the Gamersgate version, which doesn't come with a Steam Key. I had originally got the Hearts of Iron III Collection + Their Finest Hour DLC + 'Arsenal of Democracy: A Hearts of Iron Game' on sale on Gamersgate a couple weeks ago since it was so cheap and I've never tried a Grand Strategy before.

I was very impressed. While it loads a bit slowly on single state drives(at least I think that's the term), it was an amazing game. The Scale is huge. Each Continent and each Sea is made up of Provinces, which works much like the Hex Grid from Civilization V, but less uniform. But in Hearts of Iron III there are over 10,000 Provinces, and only a very small number of that is the seas. Like I said, the scale is huge.

It takes place during World War 2, and you can play any nation that existed at that time. And all the events that happened in real life during that time frame, also happen in the game, though you'll only see it if you're playing as the nation it happened too, or a nation also affected by it. But other than that, things can go any number of ways. Things tend to drift towards what happened in history, but other than UK always being Allies, Germany always being Axis, and the Soviets always being Consortium, any nation can join any faction potentially, or even remain neutral. Wanna play as Japan and seduce Mexico and Canada to the Axis and nail Murica'(♥♥♥♥ yeah!) in a 3-way? It might take a little while, but it's certainly possible.

There is a huge tech tree also, though I won't get into that.

There are also many unit types, and a very detailed military hierarchy, and an extremely large amount of room for tactics.

This game, and pretty much any other Paradox Interactive and/or Grand Strategy game, is very difficult to get into though, due to the steep learning curve. Even now I'm still getting the hang of the game, though I'm loving every moment. I recommend watching Michael Broschek's tutorial on the basics, which helped me immensely. Here's the linky link.

Also, this game is best played with all it's expansion packs, which are 'Semper Fi', 'For the Motherland', and 'Their Finest Hour', in that order of release. You also need the previous expansion to play the next. To clarify: You need the base game, Hearts of Iron III in order to play Semper Fi. You need Semper Fi in order to play For the Motherland. And finally, you need For the Motherland to play Their Finest Hour. All the other DLC's are mostly cosmetic, so you can have all armies have the appearance their real army had at that time period.

Anyway, I recommend this to any Grand Strategy fan, Paradox Interactive fan, or a Strategy fan looking for something much, MUCH deeper.
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