Aurora, a young girl from 1895 Austria, awakens on the lost fairytale continent of Lemuria. To return home she must fight against the dark creatures of the Queen of the Night, who have stolen the sun, the moon and the stars. At stake is not only Lemuria, but Aurora’s true destiny.
User reviews: Very Positive (5,166 reviews) - 94% of the 5,166 user reviews for this game are positive.
Release Date: Apr 29, 2014

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Packages that include this game

Buy Ubi Arcade Pack

Includes 3 items: Child of Light, Valiant Hearts: The Great War™ / Soldats Inconnus : Mémoires de la Grande Guerre™, Trials Fusion™

Buy Ubisoft Prime Pack

Includes 8 items: Assassin’s Creed® IV Black Flag™, Child of Light, Far Cry 3, South Park™: The Stick of Truth™, Tom Clancy’s Splinter Cell Blacklist, Trials Fusion™, Valiant Hearts: The Great War™ / Soldats Inconnus : Mémoires de la Grande Guerre™, Watch_Dogs™


Recommended By Curators

"Aesthetic game with great 2d-gfx and music. Easy to learn, hard to master battle system. Nice fairytale story. RPG for the young and the young at heart."
Read the full review here.

About This Game

Aurora, a young girl from 1895 Austria, awakens on the lost fairytale continent of Lemuria. To return home she must fight against the dark creatures of the Queen of the Night, who have stolen the sun, the moon and the stars. At stake is not only Lemuria, but Aurora’s true destiny.

Key Features

An Adventure Waits!
Created by a talented team at Ubisoft Montreal using the UbiArt Framework, Child of Light is an RPG inspired by fairy tales complemented with a story carefully crafted in verse and rhyme. Step into a living painting, the breathtaking scenery of Lemuria is an invitation to explore a long lost world.

Enter the World of Lemuria
Across your journey through Lemuria you will encounter many eccentric creatures, from spirits of the forest to talking mice to wicked witches and evil sea serpents. Discover a vast land with iconic locations and exciting dungeons that will evolve as Aurora regains the stolen lights.

Fight the Dark
Battle enemies using an Active-Time Battle System alongside the firefly Igniculus and other members of Aurora’s party on their quest to recover the sun, the moon and the stars. Beat your enemies using a deep party system and the varied skill trees of your party. Play with a friend as both Aurora and Igniculus using the seamless drop-in drop-out cooperative multiplayer.

System Requirements

    • OS: Windows Vista, Windows 7 SP1, Windows 8/8.1 (32/64bit versions)
    • Processor: Intel Core2Duo E8200 @ 2.6 GHz or AMD Athlon II X2 240 @ 2.8 GHz
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: nVidia GeForce 8800 GT or AMD Radeon HD2900 XT (512MB VRAM with Shader Model 4.0 or higher)
    • DirectX: Version 9.0c
    • Network: Broadband Internet connection
    • Hard Drive: 3 GB available space
    • Sound Card: DirectX Compatible Sound Card with latest drivers
    • Additional Notes: Windows-compatible keyboard and mouse required, optional Microsoft XBOX360 controller or compatible
    • OS: Windows Vista, Windows 7 SP1, Windows 8/8.1 (32/64bit versions)
    • Processor: Intel Core2Quad Q8400 @ 2.6 GHz or AMD Athlon II X4 620 @ 2.6 GHz
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: nVidia GeForce GTX260 or AMD Radeon HD4870 (512MB VRAM with Shader Model 4.0 or higher)
    • DirectX: Version 9.0c
    • Hard Drive: 3 GB available space
    • Sound Card: DirectX Compatible Sound Card with latest drivers
    • Additional Notes: Windows-compatible keyboard and mouse required, optional Microsoft XBOX360 controller or compatible
Helpful customer reviews
81 of 91 people (89%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
10.0 hrs on record
Posted: May 18
Charming, elegant as well as heart-rending, Montreal brought to life a beautiful side-scroller RPG which will capture your hearts and take your breath away.

Child. Tuck yourself in bed
And let me tell a story
Of Lemuria, a long lost kingdom,
And a girl born for glory.

With the above narration, starts the adventure of Aurora, a princess "born for glory".
Having put his daughter to bed at night, Aurora's father finds himself in awe to see his daughter not wake up at bright sunlight and soon falls sick. Presumed dead, her father sick, Aurora wakes up in a mysterious place with no one of her knowing face. Isolated and afraid, Aurora must make her journey through the vast kingdom of Lemuria to save her father from his uncharted sickness.

Child of Light's excellent aspects ;
+An exhillarating and tranquilizing mix of music.
+A beautifully executed simple story.
+Hand drawn art which appeals and steals the eye's scrutiny.
+A classic blend of RPG elements in a side scroller.
+Turn-based combat which hardly gets boring.
+Lovely side-characters with their quirks diverse.
+A delightful main lead.
+An agape world of Lemuria with bellyful of quests.

Child of Light's not so excellent aspects :
-Rhyming feels forced at times.
Almost every aspect of Child of Light appeals to you, enlightens you and charms you with its elegance. Child of Light is a adventure which is worth every dollar of the 15 it is asking for. Play it and all your warmth, care, feelings and affections will be content.
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91 of 142 people (64%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
14.9 hrs on record
Posted: May 18
Child of Light is a tribute to JRPG which has a beautiful presentation, lovely soundtrack but lacks a soul in many other aspects. I really wanted to like this game but the more I played, the more I discovered that something(s) were missing and was left hugely disappointed by the end of the game.

- The art style is top notch.
- The soundtrack is top notch and sets the mood with its melancholic undertones.
- Story is simple but cheerful and gloomy at times.
- Boss battles test how well you understand the combat.

- Requires Uplay, if you hate it, you'll still hate it.
- Rhyming gets tiresome midway through the game. It's not horrible but it'll grind your gears.
- The battle system is just a shallow copy of the Grandia system and can be easily 'cheesed' with little thought for tactics and gets repetitive fairly quickly.
- RNG is on the enemy's side as they get their 'chance' skills in regularity while you seldom get yours.
- Combat is a mixed bag. It's fun early on but get extremely repetitive in the latter half. Early on I found myself willing to get into fights however later on I found myself avoiding it. That's a major red flag for a JRPG.
- The platforming controls are just terrible, running feels clunky and flying feels extremely stiff. There's this cutscene where you learn how to fly, it looks wonderful however when you're given control your first reaction will be 'Urgh'.
- The characters 'classes' are too situational or down right useless. The most useful characters are Aurora (Light), Rubella (Damage dealer, health mage), Finn (Elemental mage), Trista (Damage dealer, protection mage) everyone else are just not good.
- Party line up is too limiting, it should've been a 3 man line-up which would've allowed for more combat depth and flexibility. As it stands it's tedious to switch out members because they don't fit the situation.
- Gems\Oculi are not a fully thought out idea, it's like a shallow copy of the Materia system from FF7 just not as good. It offers little to no benefit with it's 'chance' bonuses.

- Can't reorganise your party line up outside of combat. If you made a mistake and one of your favoured members dies and had to be swapped out there's no was y swap until your next battle...this is stupid.
- There are no stores in the game, all consumables are found scattered throughout the world. Why not implement a store system so the player could stock up on items.

- Aurora's model doesn't fit the game at all. While it looks good it just doesn't mesh well with the visuals as it looks too 3d almost as if it was made to stand out from the others and looks odd.
- Gems\Oculi are rarely given throughout the game and towards the end are generously dished out.
- Boss fights are not memorable especially the last boss.

I really thought I would love this game but it feels somewhat soulless. Ubisoft positioned this game as a tribute to JRPG of old but for some reason it doesn't feel like a JRPG to me at all. The combat system is not memorable or engaging, the story while simple doesn't really hold up by the end. Don't get me wrong, it's not a bad game it's just not a good 'JRPG' as aspects which make a good JRPG are under developed or simply missing. Maybe next time...because, well it's Ubisoft, you know a sequel is coming.

Recommended for those interested in a simple rpg.
Not recommended for JRPG fans looking for a fresh take.

PS: Steam please give us a neutral recommendation option.
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19 of 19 people (100%) found this review helpful
8.4 hrs on record
Posted: July 24
Child of Light is beautiful. Its mysterious land of Lemuria is a faded watercolour dreamscape of floating cities, gnarled and twisted forests, ancient ruins and peaceful country villages. It really does look like a fairy tale brought to life. Exploring spooky forests, shining lights on secret doors, collecting wishes; you're basically playing through a charming storybook adventure. Completing the feel is the lack of dialogue- there's no voice-acting apart from in some book-ending expository cutscenes, with characters otherwise speaking entirely in text bubbles. And rhyming. Because everyone rhymes in fairy tales.
Our heroine Aurora is the mischievous daughter of an Austrian Duke. One day she falls ill, slips into a coma and wakes to find herself transported to Lemuria. To return home all she has to do is recover Lemuria's Sun, Moon and Stars, stolen by the mysterious and nefarious Black Queen, Umbra, who seriously has it in for our heroine for reasons that slowly become clear over the course of the game. Her journey will lead her across a beautiful but dangerous landscape, with a motley crew of companions at her side.
As well as the gorgeous landscapes, character and enemy designs are terrific. Monsters are delightfully creepy. Wolves, ogres and spiders inject just the right amount of menace into the world, getting that sense of a formerly idyllic dream slowly invaded by a nightmare spot on. Balanced against these horrors are the charming cast, from the brave and forthright Princess Aurora herself to her jester companion Rubella and Capilli magician Finn. Child of Light's playful sense of humour is also ever present.The various regions and towns that you explore each have their own feel and atmosphere - unique and yet cohesively tied to the overall aesthetic.
Aurora's constant ally and companion is the firefly Igniculus, sent to help the Princess by the seemingly benevolent Forest Lady, who appears to serve the powers of Light. He's your guide, really, a sentient ball of Light popping up to give you advice and encouragement. Igniculus can also be controlled; you can send him flying off to collect floating 'wishes', which restore your health and mana.
You'll explore Lemuria from a 2D viewpoint, with much of the non-combat action feeling like a simple platformer. Quite early on you unlock the ability to fly, which opens up levels for exploration and generally adds to the floaty, dreamlike atmosphere of the game. Most of the enjoyment of travelling around the world comes from zooming about discovering secret areas and items, of which there are many.
Run into an enemy while exploring, or flying, and you'll zoom in to take part in some good old fashioned turn-based battles. Child of Light utilises an action bar mechanic that will be familiar to anyone who's played Final Fantasy before.Combat may seem simple at first, but you quickly realise that simply relying on basic physical attacks isn't a viable strategy. It's important to have an idea of what your plan is, and to get your timing exactly right. There are also several special actions that increase your options.
You control just two characters in battle, but switching in a new one is a free action. The best fights have you juggling your team in an out, de-buffing with one and dishing out the damage with another. Each character has their own skill tree, with three or four branches.
While a briefer experience than most RPGs, Child of Light's shorter running time is actually not a bad thing. While promoting the game the development team described their aim as providing a brief but memorable adventure, like a couple of evenings spent reading your favourite storybook as a child. That's exactly the feeling I got, the sense of charm and wonder never allowed to grow stale with a bloated run-time. It's refreshing to play a game so confident and singular in purpose.
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16 of 17 people (94%) found this review helpful
27.6 hrs on record
Posted: May 14
A beautiful tale in a watercolor land,
Written as though from a children author's hand.
Every line of dialogue you'll see will be written in verse,
Unwrapping the tale of a princess and a curse.
For the moon and the sun and the stars are all taken,
Aurora's quest is made clear, the sky she must awaken!
Cleverly written with characters as charming as can be,
If you like RPGs, then I'm sure you'll agree!

In all seriousness though, this game is a nice feel-good RPG, although one I felt to be relatively on the short side as far as RPGs go. The gameplay is turn-based with a gimmick in the form of a "speed" bar that will determine who attacks first, who manages to block or disable another, etc. Buffs and debuffs are available to speed you up, slow down enemies, block enemies from being capable of disarming you, etc. An interesting gimmick and well executed. One thing I found however was that there was a serious lack side quests, adding to the game's shortness (there's perhaps three "main" side quests I counted, all of which can be easily completed within less than ten minutes).

The draw here is definitely how unique it is from a visual and storytelling standpoint. As stated, every single line of dialogue rhymes which I have to commend the writers for. Graphics-wise, the game looks like a beautiful watercolor painting. That said, one criticism I personally have was that with the exception of Aurora and a handful of other characters, all animations looks to be done in flash with serious tweening abuse, which I felt somewhat cheapened the experience (though that's likely my inner art snob talking, so take that with however large a grain of salt you will). It does cause some dissonance beside the rendered model of Aurora as well which was initially difficult to see past. These are minor complaints however. This game is gorgeous, the characters are lively and likable, and the soundtrack is amazing. Definitely worth owning.

I do need to point out one final thing however, as this might be a deal-breaker for some. You WILL be forced to download Uplay. It doesn't matter if you launch the game through Steam, it will still automatically open Uplay. I've yet to encounter any problems other than being annoyed by the extra program running, however it might be worth your time to check out other reviews and the experiences other players have described before you make your final decision. There's been a lot of complaints about problems with save files or the game not launching. You have been warned.
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15 of 16 people (94%) found this review helpful
11.3 hrs on record
Posted: July 5
when i think of buying this game i thought i was wasting my money but after playing for just 2 hours i was frozen. this is the type of game that i searching for soo long and said it was amazing. Child of Light far exceeded my expectations and has now become one of my favorite games of all time. The environment is lush , beautiful and the game play is seamless. this is one of the most attractive, beautiful and atmospheric games I have played in recent years. The fairytale script is good enough to travel you back to your childhood, filling you with nostalgia, the art direction can leave you speechless, as well as the amazing soundtrack.
This easily could have retailed for $49.99 and would be worth every penny still.
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