Henry Stauf's mansion has been abandoned for as long as anyone dare remember. Stauf was a master toy maker, a maker of amazing puzzles and this strange house was his greatest creation. Now the mansion stands empty, rotting ever since the children started dying, ever since the six guests came.
User reviews: Mixed (184 reviews)
Release Date: Apr 28, 1993
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Packages that include this game

Buy 7th Guest & 11th Hour Bundle

Includes 2 items: The 11th Hour, The 7th Guest

 

Recommended By Curators

"One of the scariest games I played as a kid. Stauf still haunts my dreams. It is a bit dated, but the music is timeless. - Meg"

About This Game

Henry Stauf's mansion has been abandoned for as long as anyone dare remember. Stauf was a master toy maker, a maker of amazing puzzles and this strange house was his greatest creation. Now the mansion stands empty, rotting ever since the children started dying, ever since the six guests came. Now there are only the eerie lights and the terrible sing-song rhymes of the children.

And suddenly, you are in the house. You move from room to room, step-by-terrifying-step, as scenes from that night of horror come to life. Because Stauf's game isn't over. There were six guests the world knew about - and there was one other. Stauf's mad mansion lives again. And only you can end the nightmare and learn the secret of The 7th Guest.

This Award-Winning Game Features:
  • Groundbreaking use of full-motion video and dialogue recorded by live actors in a terrifyingly real virtual environment.
  • Old Man Stauf's bizarre puzzles to solve and games to play.
  • 22 Stunningly rendered, devilishly surprising, 3-D rooms await you in this fully explorable haunted mansion.
  • 2 CDs of extensive gameplay with an original musical score.

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
SteamOS + Linux
    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows XP / Vista / 7
    • Processor: 1.8 GHz Processor
    • Memory: 512 MB RAM
    • Graphics: 3D graphics card
    • DirectX: Version 9.0c
    • Hard Drive: 2 GB available space
    Recommended:
    • OS: Windows 7
    • Processor: 2 GHz Processor
    • Memory: 512 MB RAM
    • Graphics: 3D graphics card
    • DirectX: Version 9.0c
    • Hard Drive: 2 GB available space
    Minimum:
    • OS: Mac OS X 10.6.8
    • Processor: 1.8 GHz Processor
    • Memory: 1 GB RAM
    • Graphics: 1GB of RAM graphics
    • Hard Drive: 2 GB available space
    Recommended:
    • OS: Mac OS X 10.8
    • Processor: 2 GHz Processor
    • Memory: 1 GB RAM
    • Graphics: 1GB of RAM graphics
    • Hard Drive: 2 GB available space
    Minimum:
    • OS: Ubuntu 14.04 LTS
    • Processor: 1.8 GHz Processor
    • Memory: 512 MB RAM
    • Graphics: 3D graphics card
    • Hard Drive: 2 GB available space
    Recommended:
    • OS: Ubuntu 14.04 LTS
    • Processor: 2 GHz Processor
    • Memory: 512 MB RAM
    • Graphics: 3D graphics card
    • Hard Drive: 2 GB available space
Helpful customer reviews
12 of 23 people (52%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
0.2 hrs on record
Posted: May 5
Beat this game when it came out. It was my first CD based video game. It's not that great anymore, some pretty obtuse puzzles and grainy FMV video sequences. While I shouldn't necessarily rate it down as it should be taken as a product of it's time, and a pioneer in this sort of gaming, anyone buying this for the first time NOW will likely be very unimpressed.
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37 of 42 people (88%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
0.9 hrs on record
Posted: July 3, 2014
The wonderful thing about 90's computer games is that the media itself carries an uncanny horror with it, possibly due to the fact that as soon as the game boots up, you are reminded of the 90's. For those who are not old enough to have experienced TGIF sitcoms, Pogs, boybands, teased bangs, Buffy, and dialup modems firsthand, this game may appear to be some Satanic computer vomit you only read of in urban legends.

In a way, The 7th Guest is just that. It's not a game where you "just have to get over the graphics." The graphics are not as problematic as other aspects of the game. For example, the cutscenes communicate some story behind the house and all the puzzles in it, but they are so bizarre and disjointed. You finish the cutscenes and hope it was a hallucination, because otherwise that would mean that someone (or more accurately, a whole team of people) willingly unleashed this upon humanity. The gameplay is truly a product of its time: clunky.

Fortunately, the puzzles (the meat of the game) are very challenging and unique, so no matter your thinking style, there will probably be at least one that you can solve instantly, and several that will leave you scratching your head. I consulted a guide quite a bit to get through several puzzles.

TL;DR Don't do this to yourself unless you really, really like puzzles. Recommended because I really, really do.
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26 of 31 people (84%) found this review helpful
1.6 hrs on record
Posted: April 14, 2014
I owned this game for the phillips CD-I back in the 90's. I was young and the game scared me so much I could only manage to play it in short bursts. Safe to say that the game isn't as frightening as I remember but the puzzles are just as hard!

The 7th Guest has a really intriguing story line that pulls you into trying to complete the puzzles.

The game design leaves alot of opportunitys to get lost (Hey it's an old game!)

*****What it doesn't tell you which you really aught to know, is that there is a book/journal at the enterance of the house that tells you the rules and aim of each puzzle.******

All in all its fun and challenging, 7/10 Would be much higher if it had a little more guidence in regard to puzzle rules. :D
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18 of 21 people (86%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
12.6 hrs on record
Posted: October 10, 2014
If you bought a CD-ROM drive or a PC equipped with one in the 90s, you probably got a copy of the The 7th Guest as part of the deal, and as any gamer over 30 will tell you, it was freaking amazing! Oh man, fuzzy footage of hammy (but commendably enthusiastic) actors against low-res, ray-traced backgrounds? How could such mighty wonders be explained outside of the direct intervention of a loving god?! Yes, those were simpler, more naive times, before even the nerdiest of nerds had dial-up internet, and we took our digital miracles wherever we could find them. FMV games (many hastily produced) rained down like Mana from Heaven, and we gobbled up each glorious glob without a critical thought.

Sadly, most of those once awe-inspiring games from the early CD-ROM era have aged pretty terribly; even if you can manage to get your 21st-century eyeballs beyond their nauseous graphics, the majority of them are simply excruciating to play. Incredible to my 32 year-old self, however, The 7th Guest is a charming and addictive game even today! It's got piles of great puzzles (and a few hilariously awful ones for good measure), B-movie charm oozing in yellow rivulets from its ears, some really memorable MIDI courtesy of The Fat Man, and a lot of genuinely interesting art design! Granted, the appeal will probably be limited to aging weirdos like myself who love puzzles, camp and old things, but those weirdos should have a great time with this delightfully moldy oldie!

(Kid me would think adult me a genius for being able to solve all the puzzles.)
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34 of 51 people (67%) found this review helpful
5.3 hrs on record
Posted: July 25, 2014
Full disclosure. I've wanted to finish this game for YEARS. I remember when my pops bought a boxed copy and it wouldn't run because it required upgrades such as a 4X Speed CD-ROM drive. Well after getting all the upgrades we got to play it and well, it ended up being a brutal puzzle game with over the top acting and a molasses interface. Well in 2014 nothing has changed but finishing this game was always a itch I'd wanted to scratch. Now that I've done, I wished I played something else. The good? The house in 7th Guest is nicely realized. Great atmosphere and some of the puzzles are fun. The bad? Well, everything else. The aforementioned acting is even worse now and I'm still not sure what the heck the story was. And some of the puzzles are absolutely brutal diificulty wise (a special screw you to the piano puzzle - memory puzzles are the worst for me). Needless to say, the payoff isn't there and while the pure nostalgia had me smiling at times, I was slapped back to reality as I slowly, SLOWLY moved through the mansion trying to find the next puzzle. So the bottom line is I do not recommend this game unless you remember those early 90s where a couple 100 MBs of storage space or a 4X speed CD-ROM drive was a big deal. Otherwise, move on.

EDIT: I'd be remiss if I didn't add you could skip puzzles. You just have to navigate the mansion SLOWLY to get to a book in the study describing how the puzzle can be solved. Do that three times (THREE) and the puzzle will be solved for you. Not great but better than tearing your hair out.
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