The original PC sensation that started it all! We've brought it back in all its virginal glory! The world was a much simpler place in 1995. The kids were listening to the grunge, the first test-tube gorilla was born at the Cincinnati Zoo, and a little trivia game called YOU DON’T KNOW JACK took the interactive CD-ROM trivia game show...
User reviews: Mostly Positive (74 reviews) - 75% of the 74 user reviews for this game are positive.
Release Date: Sep 12, 1995

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Buy YOU DON'T KNOW JACK Classic Pack



About This Game

The original PC sensation that started it all! We've brought it back in all its virginal glory!

The world was a much simpler place in 1995. The kids were listening to the grunge, the first test-tube gorilla was born at the Cincinnati Zoo, and a little trivia game called YOU DON’T KNOW JACK took the interactive CD-ROM trivia game show world by storm. Play now and relive that crazy, mixed-up time all over again!

System Requirements

    • OS: Windows XP, Vista, 7, 8
    • Processor: 500 MHz processor or faster
    • Memory: 128 MB RAM
    • DirectX: Version 9.0
    • Hard Drive: 575 MB available space
    • Sound Card: 16-bit sound card
    • Additional Notes: The game runs at 640x480 max resolution. Manually adjust your Desktop resolution if you want the game to fill the screen.
Helpful customer reviews
1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
1.3 hrs on record
Posted: June 25
Had alot of fun playing this in the 90's with my siblings.

+ Lots of topics to choose from, rarely ever saw a question repeated, good replay value
+ The Anouncer on this one is the best in my opinion, he's very good at keeping the pressure on
+ Ability to play with 3 people
+ Questions are challenging ( I like that)


- a few questions are contextually sensitive to the mid nineties, like commercial jingles and refrences to TV shows that have been off the air for a few decades
- No online Multiplayer, all players have to hunch around the keyboard old school style (but this may not be a negative for some)
- the questions are Challenging (some don't like this)

Should you buy this? -Hell yea
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5 of 9 people (56%) found this review helpful
0.5 hrs on record
Posted: May 13
I loved playing this game as a teenager but unfortunately this is not the version I had. The UK version had different questions and voice actors (Paul Kaye and Mel Gedroyc among them), and UK-centric trivia. As it is, I can't answer 20-year-old US trivia questions and the US voices don't have any nostalgic charm for me (they're even pretty boring - Paul Kaye, aka Dennis Pennis, brought tons of charm and flavour to the UK version, I would guess by improvising). Shame!
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22 of 23 people (96%) found this review helpful
0.8 hrs on record
Posted: December 2, 2013
For a game that’s just shy of 20 years old, this is proof-positive that some things are timeless. As a long-time owner (yeah, I got it when it originally came out in 1995 on CD-ROM...), I can truly say the charm remains, as does the irreverence. Despite the years, the sarcasm and prodding by the “host” is just as relevant now as it was then. I always leave the game with a smile on my face.

Not only does the Steam re-release introduce a whole new generation to YDKJ, but it ditches the CD-ROM and related issues (Try grabbing the original disc and installing it on a modern, 64-bit O/S. Won’t happen without a LOT of work)...

My only real gripe is that the game is perpetually stuck at a 640x480 resolution, and going full-screen requires a manual change of the PC’s resolution to 720x480

**P.S. DO NOT forget to snag the others in the franchise. They're worth every penny!
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25 of 30 people (83%) found this review helpful
13.6 hrs on record
Posted: August 27, 2014
To make this clear, this is not for the 2011 game. Instead, it covers the original 1995 game. For those that are not familiar with the series, how the game works is that the host will read a question and give four possible answers. If you think that you know the answer, buzz in and answer. While this sounds like your typical trivia game, this is far from the truth.

One thing unique to the game is that the players receive screws. If a question appears that it looks like another player does not know, you can use the screw to “screw your opponent” forcing them to answer. If somebody has the lead, using them is a good way to try to catch up. However, if they know the answer, not only will they gain money, but also you will screw yourself and lose money instead. They may be screws, but that risk make them double-edged sword instead.

Another difference from a traditional trivia game is that the host wants action. If one player has a big lead but nobody tries to answer the question, the host will not be happy. When that happens, the host will comment on the leader’s cowardice and gets the audience involved. How can there be an audience in a video game is a mystery. When they get involved, they will say, “Don’t be a wimp!” forcing the leader to answer anyway. If you are trailing and know this, intentionally not answering is both advantageous as well as funny watching the leader’s reaction.

Visually, this is the game’s biggest weakness. Most of the time, the only things to see are some faded text, the current question, and the player scores. The only real animation worth watching is seeing what happens to your icon when the score changes. While this sounds strange, a blind person can play this game with a person that can see without any problems. With almost nothing to see, not even the host, there is little reason to watch the screen. Since this is a trivia game, making a stage like in Jeopardy! or Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? would have made the game more interesting to look at.

However, this is not a game about the visuals. Being that this was one of the first CD games, they crammed it with tons of dialog. That dialog is what makes the game fun. The host always has something interesting to say throughout the question. Even with the categories for the questions, it gets you interested in what it might be. In one case, in the category is “The Fruits in Your Looms”, they ask, “Which of these fruits derives from the Aztec word meaning testicle?” Just the fact that they would create questions using such seemingly unrelated items makes each of the questions interesting to hear. In the case of the mentioned question, the correct answer is avocado. When it comments about it and guacamole can make people burst out in laughter. When the comments are strong enough, do not be surprised if a break is required to recover from the laughter.

Considering that the game has hundreds of questions like the one above, this makes a great party game. Just remember that the game really works only when played with others. Since the game offers no computer opponents, it is not the same without live competition. While the humor is there, without competition, the game does not have the same appeal.

There is one final thing to remember. When the game wants you to type in your answer, tell the game, “F%¢& Y@#”. All three players should do this. You will love how the host reacts. What the host does to you, not so much.
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9 of 9 people (100%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
1.9 hrs on record
Posted: November 9, 2014
Windows 95 Compatibility Mode + 640x480 Screen Resolution + No Desktop Composition + No Visual Themes + No Display Scaling + Administrator Mode + Smartass Host + Mixture of Shakespeare and Scooby-Doo = Instant Memories of 1995.

See? I made it easy for you folks who complain about the game looking small on your fancy-pants 1080p displays. C:
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