Eldritch is a first-person action game inspired by roguelikes, immersive sims, and H. P. Lovecraft. Unearth ancient secrets and find your way to freedom! Sneak, fight, and explore strange worlds! Invoke mystical powers to augment your play style! Randomly generated levels provide fresh challenges and opportunities!
User reviews: Very Positive (933 reviews)
Release Date: Oct 21, 2013

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Recommended By Curators

"There are dozens of "kinda roguelike" games on Steam. This is a creepy one that's actually enjoyable!"
Read the full review here.

About This Game

Eldritch is a first-person action game inspired by roguelikes, immersive sims, and H. P. Lovecraft.
  • Unearth ancient secrets and find your way to freedom!
  • Sneak, fight, and explore strange worlds!
  • Invoke mystical powers to augment your play style!
  • Randomly generated levels provide fresh challenges and opportunities!
  • Unlock shortcuts to jump directly to deeper dungeons!

Now includes the free Eldritch: Mountains of Madness expansion!
  • Explore a 10-story dungeon beneath the mountains of Antarctica!
  • Face frightening new monsters!
  • Wield new weapons, powers, and tools!
  • Uncover grave secrets in the depths and live to tell the tale!

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
SteamOS + Linux
    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows XP
    • DirectX: Version 9.0c
    • Hard Drive: 150 MB available space
    Recommended:
    • Graphics: Dedicated graphics card
    Minimum:
    • OS: OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard
    • Graphics: GeForce 8 series or equivalent
    • Hard Drive: 150 MB available space
    Recommended:
    • Graphics: Dedicated graphics card
    Minimum:
    • OS: Ubuntu 12.04
    • Graphics: GeForce 8 series or equivalent
    • Hard Drive: 150 MB available space
Helpful customer reviews
88 of 89 people (99%) found this review helpful
2 people found this review funny
24.6 hrs on record
Posted: February 10
Do you like stoning fish-men to death with big rocks? I know I do! But if you're like me, it's a private pleasure and no one must know. So you creep out at night, ducking behind cover, keeping low to the ground, slowly rotating your irregular bit of rock (sedimentary perhaps), finding the grip to put the perfect english on it, listening for the hop-hop sounds of the fish-man as you slowly peak out, glancing briefly to see that his dopey face is turned away revealing his moist, tender cranium...

What was I talking about? Oh, yeah, Eldritch. It's pretty good.

No, scratch that, Eldritch is a ♥♥♥♥♥♥♥ miracle. Procedural generation and permadeath, the marks of the roguelike genre are two things that used to send me running like I'm trying to outrun my fat, juicy friend, who is also trying to outrun some squamous monster from the primordial deep. But somehow the dark wizards behind Eldritch managed to create the perfect combination of play to reach all the way deep into this previously forbidden zone of mine. Well, that got weird.

Anyway, what does Eldritch do so right? Well, it allows you to move in the least efficient way possible! Crouching low to the ground to move slow and silent, sliding from a run, peeking around corners while still counting as being behind the corner, jumping and pulling yourself onto ledges you can't quite clear (i.e. mantling). Those up on their gaming history might recognize these as the controls for the early Thief games and any game that has them and implements them correctly gives me a stiffy. Next, the game traps you in a nightmarish loop from which you can never escape... something, something, profit? When you die, resurrecting is only a click away, ensuring that you can get right back into the fray armed with new knowledge that may save your dumb ♥♥♥ next time. The game also takes a bit of the edge off the permadeath by allowing you to store artifacts (the game's currency and fuel for your magic) in banks that will carry over if you die.

And the in-game map is brilliant. Really? I'm trying to sell you a game based on its in-game map? Yes, I am bloody-well trying to sell you a game based on an in-game map! The procedural generation works nicely, never feeling like you're being led nowhere. Every square on the map has something to reward your exploration and the map I just touted comunicates it to you brilliantly. The map doesn't show you fine details, but simply breaks the dungeon into a leveled grid, marking off which squares you've been to and if they contain a major feature. You couldn't ask for a better companion in seeking out forbidden items spewing particle effects for you to get your sticky human hands on. Finally, the main game is just the right length. Doing a patient stealthy run, you can easily finish in about three/four hours. You'll definitely feel incentive to be careful once you make progress, but every death will make you feel like you're one more corpse in the pile you can climb to victory rather than feeling like you've just graduated college only to light yourself on fire.

And that's just the main game. Eldritch also includes two complete scenarios that lesser games would call DLC and charge you for. One simulates a cocaine and dynamite fueled rampage through an asylum to bust souls out of the walls and escape to safety before a cosmic horror chases you down and eats you. This mode will teach you that berserker raging your way through your problems is a perfectly valid solution in Eldritch, even if the stealth is so strong you just want to smear tanning butter on its pecs. Also included is a long endurance dungeon to test your stealth skills with tough foes, few resources, and no trips back to safety for a breather like are found periodically in the main game.

As for the overall aesthetic and treatment of HP Lovecraft's work? This game was made with love. Love for unfathomable abominations from beyond the stars that just want to dissect your brain and stick it in a jar. As Lovecraft fans know, old Howard P. spent a lot of time dealing with the intangibles of cosmic horror where terror comes from not being able to percieve or understand vast entities to which you are little more than the dirt beneath their heels. He also wrote schlocky adventure stories about explorers fighting monsters and zombies and ♥♥♥♥. Eldritch pulls off the balance nicely. Most of the enemies you face will be out of Lovecraft's more tangible gallery, but even with the Minecrafty graphics and squishy fish-men, the indestructible monsters like the Shoggoth and Yog Sothoth feel amorphous and dangerous. You won't spend too long looking at them because you'll be running the ♥♥♥♥ away. The bigger "cosmic" side is represented in the minimal story told only at the beginning and end with text boxes. You can't represent that sort of thing visually and Eldritch knows well enough not to try, but rest assured it's there and you will confront it along with your seeming immortality. And on the note of knowing what you can't do visually, Eldritch makes up for it with it's awesome sound design. The Minecraft look might be a little too goofy to be horrifying, but damn if the sounds don't manage to freak my ♥♥♥♥ out.

There are few indie games that I think are worth their normal asking price. I'll admit, I got this game on sale for five bucks and won't blame you if you do the same. But after having played it thoroughly, fifteen may well have been fair. Though as a fan of Thief and HP Lovecraft, it's almost like this was tailor-made for me. Bottom line: if you like stealth games, get Eldritch; if you like HP Lovecraft, get Eldritch; if you're really into roguelikes, I have no idea. Maybe this is too soft for a dedicated fan of roguelikes, but if nothing else it might be the gateway drug for somebody (me) who is put off by them.
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9 of 12 people (75%) found this review helpful
9.4 hrs on record
Posted: January 30
Eldritch
Minor Key Games

The ancient, unspeakable alien horrors of H.P. Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos universe have never been more adorable. I especially like Minor Key's rendition of the Deep Ones - the fishlike servants and enforcers of the Great Old One called Dagon. I don't know if its their bulging pixelated amphibic eyes or the sound of their confused moans echoing through the underground halls, regardless of what you will feel a little sorry for these guys everytime you squeeze the trigger of your revolver. And trust me on this one, being a game with randomly generated worlds and permanent death, Eldritch will have you squeeze that thing alot.

So yeah, Eldritch is a horror themed game that isn't a horror game. Instead it's a first-person action game that places you in an old library in New England. Through books scattered across the dusty shelves and tables you'll slowly come to understand that this isn't exactly a regular library, and not all books in there are regular books.

The preconditions of the game are very simple. Some of the books in the library will transport you to other realms, or in boring, technical terms - levels. On each level you must find and bring back a certain object to the library. Once you have them all you can access the endgame. During your exploration you can equip up to two weapons and a spell at the same time, you may also carry up to three helpful objects - a pair of boots, a kit and a piece of equipment. Weapons and objects can be found scattered across the levels, stolen, looted from dead bodies or even bought legimitately for the money (artifacts) you've collected. That's about it.

Don't be fooled by the simple setup though. You'll die easly, and when you die you'll be transported back to the library, stripped of all the buffs, artifacts (money) and items you've found and the world resets and randomizes before you enter it again. Now this obviously can be very intimidating for gamers unfamiliar with the rougelike genre, but this is also a big part of why Eldritch is such a fun experience.

The non-linear levels, the randomization of both the environments and the enemy positions, the power in combining the right type of boots with a certain kit or a spell - all are things that help create one of the most open play styles I've ever experienced in a game with so simple mechanics. The fact that the game's designer - David Pittman (Super Win The Game) used to work as a programmer on projects like BioShock 2 and The Bureau: XCOM Declassified doesn't come as a huge surprise.

If you're into adventure games and exploration and a big amount of improvisation, this is definitely a game for you.
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5 of 6 people (83%) found this review helpful
19.2 hrs on record
Posted: February 17
To go off of what another reviewer said, don't trust how the trailer makes the game atmosphere seem. It's way more tense, especially if you play cautiously.

What's interesting about this game is it can be completed in different ways. You can get lots of ammo and shoot whatever moves, you can quickly run through areas and dodge attacks...or you can make the game take three times as long like I did and take the "must stealth kill EVERY enemy approach" (protip: Not looting corpses prevents them from respawning somewhere else!).

Despite its cube-styled graphics, I think depending on how you play this game, it can be a very rewarding experience. Even after you beat the game, you can also check out the Mountains of Madness, or the Asylum if you're one of those time-trial highscorer types :)
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6 of 8 people (75%) found this review helpful
6.9 hrs on record
Posted: April 12
As a fan of Lovecraft's writing, this was a surprise gem. Minecraft-based first-person exploration and survival set in the Cthulhu Mythos universe. You find yourself waking in a strange old library and have to examine several magical tomes to find a way to escape. Each book is a portal to a different world and contains an orb that traps the soul of an Old One, which can be used to unlock further books.

Each world is based on the works of Lovecraft (ie. a winter-set world to the tune of "At the Mountains of Madness") and include roaming terrors from the inspired story. You can find a variety of weapons with which to defend yourself (or take a stealth approach if you prefer) and several utility tools to help you better get around. As you proceed you also collect "artifacts", which act as the game all-purpose currency. You can use artifacts to pay for in-store items or power abilities.

Great level design, atmosphere, creatures, audio and overall experience.
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2 of 2 people (100%) found this review helpful
2.9 hrs on record
Posted: June 13
The visual aesthetic in this game is very similar to that of Minecraft, but it doesn't at ALL take away from the spooky atmosphere. In fact the graphical simplicity is oddly easy on the eyes, and allows you to absorb the eerie ambiance and the minimal - but still great - soundtrack without being completely oggled by flashy visuals. It goes to show you don't need the most advanced graphical engine to make a solid horror game.

Eldritch is genuinely creepy, and outright terrifying once you run into your first Shoggath. Or four. Like I did. It really is an unnerving and fun game, and captures the feeling of helplessness and paranoia that Lovecraft is so famous for.

Plus the Shopkeepers are Fishmen in cute little bow ties, and a Shoggath in a giant Bowler Hat. Its surprisingly adorable and I love it.
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