What Lilly sees is about to change her life forever.... Help our heroine through a variety of enchanting environments brimming with magic and wonder, as she seeks to rewrite the past, change the present, and unlock the ultimate mystery. Geeta Games presents an animated point-and-click adventure for all ages: Lilly Looking Through.
User reviews:
Overall:
Mostly Positive (506 reviews) - 78% of the 506 user reviews for this game are positive.
Release Date: Nov 1, 2013

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Reviews

“This gentle and heartwarming puzzle/adventure game is well worth playing”
8/10 – Destructoid

“Few games pass the time more pleasantly than Lilly”
Indie Game Magazine

“Lilly Looking Through is simply a beautiful game ... If you like the idea of spending a relaxed afternoon experiencing a magical, funny, and gently challenging game, then here we have a little gem that’s absolutely worth your time and money”
This Is My Joystick

About This Game

What Lilly sees is about to change her life forever....
Help our heroine through a variety of enchanting environments brimming with magic and wonder, as she seeks to rewrite the past, change the present, and unlock the ultimate mystery. Geeta Games presents an animated point-and-click adventure for all ages:
Lilly Looking Through.

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
Helpful customer reviews
4 of 4 people (100%) found this review helpful
3.2 hrs on record
Posted: December 18, 2015
TLDR: I would recommend you play this game when it goes on sale. It is not worth paying $10.

This game is short AF. I would reccomend this game because it is an interesting point-and-click adventure. It has nice graphics and I love the googles versus no goggles mechanics. If you are interested in simple, short, point-and-click adventure, this is the game for you.HOWEVER, the number one downside of this game is that the story seems UNFINISHED. I won't spoil it for you, but there are a lot of plot holes that will leave you feeling unsatisifed.
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2 of 3 people (67%) found this review helpful
1.9 hrs on record
Posted: January 27
Lilly Looking Through is a unsatisfying point and click adventure game with little in the way of creativity or story. Puzzles are either a bit too straightforward or obtuse, with little sense or excitement behind most of them. The solution to most puzzles is to just change world modes, and for the others its fiddling with button machines until you figure out what the buttons do. The setting is extremely thin, in that you have a goal and a world but nothing beyond that. The world has no explanation or cohesiveness, just arbitrary locales. The story is more or less chasing after your friend / sibling who keeps being dragged off screen by a magic red cloth, and the game neither explains why this is happening nor does the story go any further than this.

The game has nice background music, and is visually pleasant to look at. The voice audio sounds fairly low quality, and they could have done with adding a few more variations. The 'grunt as character falls on the ground' sound is a good example as you hear it fairly often, consist of just one sample, and sometimes is played multiple times in a row. The characters say only a few words and dont emote that much.

All in all, I do not recommend this game. It provides at most 2 hours of content with no replayability. I would not recommend a purchase even at a sale price as low as $2.50 (75% off the base price $10) as there are simply many other more enjoyable games to play even at that price point. Wait for a bundle.

Lilly Looking Through has no failstates. Although I did not test it, this game would be suitable to play with a Steam Controller.
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50 of 64 people (78%) found this review helpful
3.3 hrs on record
Posted: June 7, 2014
Faulty's scorecard :-

1) Essential purchase
2) Recommended purchase
3) Recommended purchase during a sale
4) Not recommended unless heavily discounted
5) Not even recommended for Steam game collectors

Through the looking glass lense

After her young brother, Row, is whisked away by a magical scarf it becomes the task of elder sister, Lilly, to rescue him as she adventures through ten charming hand-painted locales each with their own individual set of environmental puzzles that require completing before being allowed to advance to the next area. Thankfully Lilly carries with her a set of magical goggles that enable our titular heroine to see each area in alternate dimensions which helps in solving most of the conundrums Lilly will find herself in during her brief but incredibly sweet adventure.

http://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=268298540
Lilly Looking Through barely contains any narrative other than what is set up at the start of the game - the search for and rescue of your younger brother Row. Lilly Looking Through further embraces its minimalism by abandoning the adventure game trope of inventories filled to the brim with items that may or may not be of any aid in your adventures.

http://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=256484781
Lilly Looking Through is not a particularly long or challenging game and most gamers should breeze through the ten different areas in about 2hrs. Some of the later areas do require the player to be cognisant of their surroundings such as the color-based puzzles and will require some out of the box thinking in order to get past but given the world that Lilly inhabits they are not so obtuse as to be completely out of place with the adventure and the world that the game sets up for you to explore. Solving each areas puzzle will require Lilly to do something, move something or climb something whilst often alternating between each areas dimension.

http://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=268301950
The difficulty curve is gently matched as each areas puzzles become more and more complex but not complex in such a way that hours, days or weeks could be spent by the die-hard adventurist (he/she who refuses to view a walkthrough of any kind) as they attempt to solve a particularly challenging game world riddle. To support the puzzles, GEETA GAMES, have crafted one of the most visually stunning adventures games to come along in recent years. Each area and its alternate dimension is lovingly hand-painted and are frequently gorgeous to look at. Equally as stunning is the games soundtrack. Each area has its own distinct and soothing melody that was just as lovely to listen too as the hand-painted backgrounds where to look at.

Lilly Looking Through is a gentle adventure game that can be cracked open and completed on a lazy Sunday afternoon and one that I found was a pleasant diversion from all the bombast and never-ending length that has become the AAA game of late. If I had to nit-pick I would say that Lilly is ultimately let down by its ending that does very little to explain what came before, during or even after the adventure ends. I imagine that, given GEETA GAMES budget constraints (this was a kickstarter funded project), there was a larger tale its makers wanted to tell but were unable to do so financially hence the rather abrupt and confusing ending. Hopefully Lilly Looking Through generates enough cash to see the story continue because while the game may err on the short side (very short side) it's a charming place to inhabit for a single afternoon.

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68 of 95 people (72%) found this review helpful
6.1 hrs on record
Posted: November 2, 2013
TL;DR - Wait for a bundle. It's cute but short and tedious with no story and no replay value.

Lilly looking through is a point and click atmospheric puzzle game. I hesitate to even call it an Adventure game because there's no dialog and really no story at all. It's basically a short series screens designed to create an atmosphere of whimsy with puzzles to stretch the time out. The one story element there is, chasing the little boy, is really nothing more than a macguffin to get you to the next screen.

At no time are we ever told who these kids are, where they come from, what world they are in, what the rules of it are, why they are there, where if anywhere they were planning or going and what if anything they were planning on doing before the boy was swept away.

That it appears to be presented in a package of magical whimsical mystery is just covering for the fact that in actuality there is no story at all. It's just an experience game made to set a mood and impression. That the bulk of the short play time is made up of puzzles that once figured out are almost immediately solvable the second time around and beyond just means it's experience game that you'll really only want to play once.

Speaking of the puzzles, every time you have Lilly click to go somewhere or do something you to wait. Having to sit through the slow animations every single time and not being able to skip or cancel them no matter how many times you were redoing the same motions made me want to stab my eyes out. It was just so tedious.

The fact that this game is still very short in spite of all this tediousness and the fact that they reached their Kickstarter stretch goal to make the game longer is really saying something.

If you come to the end and think 'That's it?' a short length of a game is more likely to feel noticeable and problematic than another game of the same length with a satisfying conclusion that feels like a complete, whole experience. To the Moon is a good example of the latter. It is short but that never feels problematic because there's a definite, clear conclusion that makes sense in the context of the game and the journey.

This game in comparison definitely gives a 'Huh? That's it? What does that even mean?' feel at the end which just makes the short length all the more noticeable and unforgivable. If you are going to make a game first and foremost about soaking up the atomsphere framed by gameplay that that gives no replayability to speak of then at least make it long enough so that we feel we get enough time in that world to soak up the atmosphere.

Seeing as it's both short and without a story, all your are left with is a short time with a feeling of whimsy that's mostly padded out by puzzles made tedious due to all the slow unskippable animations between motions.

Lastly, I want to talk about pricing and packages. I bought the 'Deluxe Edition' through their Humble store. The regular version for $10 pre-order at the humble store did not come with a Steam key. The 'Deluxe Edition' for $15 did. It also came with a PDF artbook, which turned out to be very short and mostly just pictures of one particular locale in the game. It's also the same PDF they are giving at GOG for $9, the price of the regular version minus 10% off new release sale. They literally charged $5 extra to for a Steam key if you bought the game from the Humble Store which is not only shady, I've honestly never seen another developer do this.

The music was excellent, relaxing, magical sounding and ambient and the best thing about the game in my opinion. It would have been nice if this had come with the 'Deluxe Edition' for $15. It didn't. The soundtrack will put you out another $10. I'll pass as I've already spent more than I should have for what I ended up getting. It's a real shame because I wanted to love this game.
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31 of 35 people (89%) found this review helpful
2.5 hrs on record
Posted: November 2, 2013
Short and relatively charming adventure in the vein of Samorost and Botanicula. No inventory management, no verbs, no dialogue, just clicking hotspots on the screen in the right order. Nice animation and graphics, soothing music and the puzzles occasionally provide a challenge. Sadly the challenge is more about trying to figure out what you should be doing than actually solving the problem itself - the age-old Myst™ curse. You find yourself spending lots of time flipping colored switches with no concept of what you're supposed to accomplish.

The story doesn't really make much sense or seem to be going anywhere. When it finally does the game just abruptly ends, and the said anticlimax just seems to underline the already short length of the game. If you've already played all Amanita Design games and still want more, then and only then consider Lilly Looking Through. Lilly doesn't quite fall in the same league, but is pleasant enough to waste a couple of hours with.
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