The Novelist asks one central question: can you achieve your dreams without pushing away the people you love? The game focuses on Dan Kaplan, a novelist struggling to write the most important book of his career while trying to be the best husband and father he can be.
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Mayormente positivos (725 análisis) - El 78% de los 725 análisis de los usuarios sobre este juego son positivos.
Fecha de lanzamiento: 10 dic. 2013

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Críticas

“The Novelist affected me, deeply and painfully ... I frequently cried at the outcomes of the decisions I made for the Kaplan family.”
Rock Paper Shotgun

“While it arrives on the heels of other notable non-combat, story-based games, it still manages to feel fresh and emotionally resonant. This is thanks to sincere, realistic writing and an inspired approach to player choice, which has you picking sides and making difficult compromises in the context of family conflicts.”
Polygon

“The Novelist is the most personal and beautiful game I have ever experienced. The creator, Kent Hudson, has quite plainly poured his heart and soul into this game, and the outcome is genuinely something to behold. Never before have I felt so emotionally involved in the characters, their situation and potential future, as in this truly player-driven story.”
10 out of 10 – GameGrin

Acerca de este juego

The Novelist asks one central question: can you achieve your dreams without pushing away the people you love? The game focuses on Dan Kaplan, a novelist struggling to write the most important book of his career while trying to be the best husband and father he can be. The Kaplans have come to a remote coastal home for the summer, unaware that they’re sharing the house with a mysterious ghostly presence: you.

Read the family’s thoughts. Explore their memories. Uncover their desires and intervene in their lives. But stay out of sight; you can’t help the Kaplans if they know there’s a ghost in the house. It’s up to you to decide how Dan’s career and family life will evolve, but choose carefully; there are no easy answers, and every choice has a cost.

Dan’s relationships – to his work, his wife, and his son – react and shift in response to your choices. With a different sequence of events in every playthrough, The Novelist gives life to a unique experience each time you play.

The decisions you make will define the Kaplans’ lives, but they may also tell you something about yourself.

Requisitos del sistema

Windows
Mac OS X
SteamOS + Linux
    Mínimo:
    • SO: Windows XP SP2 or higher
    • Procesador: 1.8 GHz
    • Memoria: 2 GB de RAM
    • Gráficos: 256 MB VRAM video card
    • Almacenamiento: 800 MB de espacio disponible
    Recomendado:
    • SO: Windows 7
    • Procesador: 2 GHz
    • Memoria: 4 GB de RAM
    • Gráficos: 512 MB VRAM video card
    Mínimo:
    • SO: OS X Lion (10.7) or higher
    • Procesador: 1.8 GHz
    • Memoria: 2 GB de RAM
    • Gráficos: 256 MB VRAM video card
    • Almacenamiento: 800 MB de espacio disponible
    Recomendado:
    • SO: OS X Mountain Lion (10.8)
    • Procesador: 2 GHz
    • Memoria: 4 GB de RAM
    • Gráficos: 512 MB VRAM video card
    Mínimo:
    • Procesador: 1.8 GHz
    • Memoria: 2 GB de RAM
    • Gráficos: 256 MB VRAM video card
    • Almacenamiento: 800 MB de espacio disponible
    • Notas adicionales: Built with Unity 4.3.4, tested in Ubuntu 12.04 and 13.10
    Recomendado:
    • Procesador: 2 GHz
    • Memoria: 4 GB de RAM
    • Gráficos: 512 MB VRAM video card
Análisis de usuarios
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Mayormente positivos (725 análisis)
Publicados recientemente
Swift_Justice
( 7.7 h registradas )
Publicado el 17 de mayo
A while back, I received this game among a bunch of others in a Humble Bundle. Since this isn't typically the genre of game that I play, I added it to my library and promptly forgot about it. Just a few days ago, upon noticing the game in my library, I installed it with the intent of farming some steam trading cards and deleting it afterwards.

Allow me to say that I am *SO* glad that curriosity got the better of me and I decided to give the game a try. In complete honesty, I can say that I don't think I've ever become so emotionally invested in a game's fictional family as I did with the Kaplans.

This being said, I would recommend that anyone playing this game should play it in Story mode as opposed to Stealth mode. The stealth mechanic can get a bit annoying and clunky, while also making the Kaplans' stories that much less immersive than you building/observing their lives free-rein. This puts a greatter emphasis on the game's "Story-Rich" tag, and less on the "Stealth" tag, which in turn--I believe--plays to its strengths.
¿Es útil? No Divertido
Scrubsauce
( 4.0 h registradas )
Publicado el 13 de mayo
The Novelist is a game that falls into that bucket of games that aren't exactly interactive experiences like Dear Esther, but still not nearly as involved gameplay wise as the majority of mainstream FPS games. The title sees you patrolling the Summer home of a frustrated author and his single unit family as some sort of "presence" or "ghost". There are two distinct game "difficulties", in the first you can patrol the house on foot (I assume its on foot, the player's avatar is still a bit of a mystery reserved for hints found in the notes scattered through the levels) without the NPC's noticing you. The second takes on a more stealth-based approach, requiring you to hide from the family as you peruse through their thoughts and belongings.
Basic gameplay involves you searching through the house and possessing the thoughts of the family to determine what the hopes, needs and feelings are of each family member. You can navigate through traditional walking or via possession of light fixtures. After you discover enough information to continue, you can either stick around to get the rest of the missing information, or make a decision on how to influence the father's thoughts. After a you commit to your choices, the house switches to night, where you can discover notes relating the experiences of past denizens of the house and finally pass your decisions on to the father.
The story threads hinge very much on which characters you choose to make happy at the end of each day, and the choices directly effect the NPC's moods and relationships with each other as the Summer progresses. You can go the route of making everyone as happy as possible, or focus only on the needs of a single family member depending on your decisions. The house looks pretty and has just enough detail in it for you to have to search for clues during the day without getting lost in the clutter. For a game that depends a lot on moods, the characters have somewhat blank painted-like faces, a smart decision on their part as now the characters con convey their mood via body language instead of heavily involved face posing.
As someone entering the working world trying to balance time between family, career, and hobbies, the game really clicked with me conceptually, and though its very subtle in its pace and approach to gameplay, I still found myself enjoying it for the duration of a Saturday afternoon. Length (~3 hours) may be a consideration for some, so waiting for a discount might make it more of a bang for your buck.
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vodkaandcoke123
( 2.5 h registradas )
Publicado el 9 de mayo
I always wanted to pretend i was a lightbulb. 10/10.
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Vixzen
( 1.8 h registradas )
Publicado el 8 de mayo
The games starts with you witnessing three family members, Dan (husband/father), Linda (wife/mother), and Tommy (son), going on holiday for the summer so Dan can concentrate on writing his next book without all of the distractions that being at home brings. Needless to say that even going away from home with family members will still bring it's own distractions as the family members each have specific things that they want to do whilst they are away, which don't generally include just letting Dan get on with his book.

There are two ways to play this game - story mode, or stealth mode. I chose to play the game in story mode as I just find stealth generally too frustrating, and I believe that from what I got out of the game's story-telling, I definitely made the right choice personally to remove the stealth element.

Your role within the game is to observe the three family members. From your observations you will find out what they each want from a particular moment in time, and from there you can choose your preferred outcome for only one character, and if you have the time and inclination to do more investigation around the house for each remaining family member, you can potentially choose a compromise for another character who didn't get their first preference. Your decisions will have an effect on what happens in the future so choose wisely, and obviously someone will always end up being disappointed.

You play as a ghostly presence within the house - one that can either walk around the house in plain sight (being careful not to get spotted, if playing in stealth mode), or one that can possess the lights/lamps within the house to travel without being seen. You can only be spotted by the family a small number of times in stealth mode per chapter, and after that you lose your ability to influence the choices the family make; however in story mode you can walk around at will which I found to be a much more enjoyable choice for how I wanted to play the game.

In order to find the outcomes for the family members each day, you do this by reading notes/books/pictures that are strewn around the house, and by reading the memories of each family member and walking around the house playing as each character in turn finding clues as to what they would like to achieve.

I found this game to be incredibly atmospheric. From the music to the cell-shaded visuals, it gives a sense of isolation in the big house on the cliff. Seeing how this (almost) visual novel plays out from your own choices I found to be a very personal and emotionally engaging process. I would also praise the voice acting as it really adds to the personality of the characters and the ongoing story.

It is a little frustrating at times having to walk around the whole house at least 6 times if you want to find all of the outcomes/compromises for the characters, particularly when the family are all walking around doing their own thing, but in general that still didn't spoil the atmosphere for me. There were a couple of moments where the outcomes and compromises that I had to pick seemed a little bit unrealistic in terms of how quickly the family could seemingly start to fall apart, but I managed to pull it together enough for each character to get a mostly positive ending for all family members.

This certainly isn't a game for people who want something action-packed, but if you want to be engaged with somewhat challenging decisions, character relationships and atmosphere, this would be a game I'd recommend trying, though I'd maybe wait for a sale to pick this up, as this is a short 2(ish) hour play-through for a £10.99 price-tag.
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Freelancer Sync™
( 2.9 h registradas )
Publicado el 30 de abril
Damnit, want a new ending. One where Dan and Linda get rid of ♥♥♥♥ing Tommy, and end up happy together, perfectly balancing Dan's writing, Linda's painting, and their shared fondness of alcohol.
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Damoisme
( 6.0 h registradas )
Publicado el 29 de abril
In my first playthrough I wrote a novel that was so good it instantly became part of the American literary canon, enjoyed a passionate and sexually charged life with my wife, and screwed up my son so badly that he was doomed to a miserable life of crappy jobs and few friends.

I think I got the good ending.
¿Es útil? No Divertido
blind_sally
( 2.3 h registradas )
Publicado el 23 de abril
"Meh" incarnate.
¿Es útil? No Divertido
riderchoi
( 13.1 h registradas )
Publicado el 21 de abril
The game is not very long and since I am a parent as well. It reminded me all the struggles that I have in making decisions. And it actually let me experience "what if" scenarios which makes this to have a replayability (probably not right after you finish it once)

I like the art style of the game, very nice voice over. Would like to hear more voice over from the old letters.
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PhilipPino
( 0.6 h registradas )
Publicado el 17 de abril
¿Es útil? No Divertido
James
( 0.5 h registradas )
Publicado el 16 de abril
S'alright but nothing special 9/15
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Ketonal
( 7.4 h registradas )
Publicado el 3 de abril
I was warned. Saw few bad reviews and decided to play it anyway. I mean how bad could it be? Especially that more than 3/4 reviews were positive?

But believe me - it's terrible.
Gameplay, music, graphics - this is fine. Or maybe i didn't cared.

Game is ruined by it's main rule. Whatever choice you made - there will always be one person happy, one less happy and one totally unhappy. Also author doesn't really understand what compromise means. Also some choices are just stupid.. I mean - how much time you need to play with your kid? Or how much time you have to spend with wife/husband to not turn into strangers? You can spend hour helping you kid to build a car without throwing your work/marriage out of the window. But not in this game. Usually people talk with each other. Thats why they understand others needs. Here we can see letters to friends, boss, other familly members and very limited signs of communication between Kaplan's familly itself. They are rather like 3 selfish cats put in small room than familly on vacations.


IMPORTANT RULE THAT WORKS IN REAL LIFE (consider remembering it as it might be helpful):

HAPPY MARIAGE = HAPPY CHILD
In the meantime I finished game with Dan and Lisa living like on endless honeymoon and having good jobs, while their son was in terrible condition, bullied and living sad life. What the ♥♥♥♥?

Author attempted to show some "adult's live". He failed. This game is bulls***.
¿Es útil? No Divertido
Jeremy
( 3.4 h registradas )
Publicado el 31 de marzo
To hear the full review, listen to the episode on Game Hoard Podcast

Gameplay
Interestingly, the game offers you two different modes at the beginning, Story and Stealth. Although the core gameplay is the same, in Stealth mode the family can see you and you must remain hidden in order to be able to influence them. You accomplish this by hiding inside light bulbs, for some reason that is never explained. Unfortunately, both modes get tedious. In Story, the game has no challenge to it and it's basically just a mix of "walking simulator" and choose-your-own adventure gameplay. In Stealth mode, you end up spending a lot of time just hanging out in lightbulbs, waiting for family members to walk to another room.

The core gameplay consists of you reading notes and letters left by the family members to find out what they want. You can also read their thoughts and explore their memories. Ultimately, you find out what each person wants and then select who gets their want by touching the object associated with the want. Gameplay then shifts to nighttime mode where you read more notes left by the house's previous owners and can choose a compromise for another family member to at least partially get their want.

There are a lot of unique ideas present in this gameplay loop that I really like. The problem is, what I have just described is the whole game and you have to repeat it for nine chapters with very little variation. What feels very fresh and interesting at the start of the game feels way overplayed and boring by the end, even though the game takes only 2-3 hours to complete. In the end, I felt that the game only really had about 30 minutes worth of ideas and the game felt very stretched and empty as a result.

Presentation
The game has a great cell-shaded aesthetic and the family members all move about and act in realistic ways. I found it immersive in this way where I really did feel like I was observing a real family go about their day. Unfortunately, the graphics suffer the same problem as the gameplay, as being confined to a single house with three characters for several hours means that you are looking at the same boring rooms over and over again.

Sound Design
The music does a good job setting the tone but isn't anything to write home about. On the other hand, the voice acting is great, which really carried the game since it's mostly about listening to the internal monologues of these characters. The actors were very convincing and were able to put a lot of emotion into their lines without hamming it up.

Story
Essentially, the family has moved to a remote summer home so that the father/husband can focus on writing his novel. The mother/wife is unhappy in the marriage and an aspiring artist. Their son is struggling with bullying and schoolwork. It's not the most interesting story but it is very human and the characters feel like real people. It is interesting to see how decisions made in one chapter effect the rest and what ending you get. Also welcome is a "The story so far" feature when you load up the game.

Recommendation
Overall, I felt the game just got very stale by the end but it's still a unique experience that you may like if you want a non-violent, non-competitive game focused on family drama. If you like the "Aspirations" part of the Sims games, you may find something to like here. For most people, however, I think the experience may fall a bit flat.
¿Es útil? No Divertido
gmorel1916
( 2.5 h registradas )
Publicado el 30 de marzo
Great story with good gameplay. Played through a couple times to get the different endings. Worth buying.
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Raid
( 0.5 h registradas )
Publicado el 29 de marzo
The Novelist is a great idea for a game, and it manages to mostly deliver on its premise. The idea of a branching narrative based on the decisions made by the player, interestingly a novelist, is something that has tremendous promise and has generally been carried out well in Telltale Games. Here, in the Novelist, the choices the player makes do, in fact, guide the story though it does so artificially. I say that because the choice the player is faced with are usually those that pit the various family members against each other in situations that would not necessarily present themselves as opposing ideals. While the no-win situations presented in The Walking Dead make sense thematically and situationally, the ones presented here just feel forced.

I do like the idea of the game, and think that this game is actually very well done, despite some of its false feeling delivered by the decisions, and the ultimately tough outcomes the player will receive. Regardless, the decisions you make do create some interesting situations. The graphics are good, the music is fitting, and the game is good for a playthrough or two.
¿Es útil? No Divertido
Narrow
( 3.6 h registradas )
Publicado el 29 de marzo
Very badly written.
You actually don't give a ♥♥♥♥ about your choices.
¿Es útil? No Divertido
TheBeast.13
( 2.8 h registradas )
Publicado el 28 de marzo
This game forces you to make some pretty difficult decision and you get to see those decisions play out!
¿Es útil? No Divertido
CredulousLeaf52
( 4.0 h registradas )
Publicado el 22 de marzo
Very fun and relaxing game, hoping to see another game like this.
¿Es útil? No Divertido
Schareazar
( 3.5 h registradas )
Publicado el 21 de marzo
4/10

Only the story keeps tha game playable, but even that has its flaws. I think (not 100% sure) no matter what you chose, you can't make everyone happy.
Gameplay is completely repeatable- search the house for clues (often same objects), read everyone's memory, pick 1 or 2 compromises. Rinse and repeat 9 times.
The mode in which Kaplans can see you and you have to remain stealthed makes it even more annoying.
Graphics look cheap and strange. Music is just 1 looped track.
I would like to see a different ending, but just can't see myself replaying 2h only for that reason.
¿Es útil? No Divertido
gяуffιи∂σя яуαи
( 1.8 h registradas )
Publicado el 12 de marzo
I just completed this game after a short 95 minute run. I would only buy this game if you want to play over and over for a different outcome. It was a waste of money if you play this only once. I went in thinking it would be just another choice after choice and nothing happens, but this game will send chills down your spine with the soundtrack and the facts. It may seem like a fictional ghost story but this game is more than real. 7/10. Doing another run for sure.
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Adnawun
( 1.7 h registradas )
Publicado el 11 de marzo
I really loved this game. Played through with story mode just to get an idea of what I'd be getting myself into and could definitely see myself playing this again with stealth mode to see the challenge. I found it to be quite sweet in the way the story(ies) was told depending on your choices and made you consider priorities (work, family, life) to get the right 'balance'.

It falls more into the category of artistic/storytelling games but the game mechanics were decent and allowed enough exploration and player interaction to feel like a 'game'. I have no idea how varied the outcomes were, but it is that question that makes you want to start over from the beginning (and get your money worth).
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A 2 de 2 personas (100%) les ha sido útil este análisis
Recomendado
1.8 h registradas
Publicado el 8 de mayo
The games starts with you witnessing three family members, Dan (husband/father), Linda (wife/mother), and Tommy (son), going on holiday for the summer so Dan can concentrate on writing his next book without all of the distractions that being at home brings. Needless to say that even going away from home with family members will still bring it's own distractions as the family members each have specific things that they want to do whilst they are away, which don't generally include just letting Dan get on with his book.

There are two ways to play this game - story mode, or stealth mode. I chose to play the game in story mode as I just find stealth generally too frustrating, and I believe that from what I got out of the game's story-telling, I definitely made the right choice personally to remove the stealth element.

Your role within the game is to observe the three family members. From your observations you will find out what they each want from a particular moment in time, and from there you can choose your preferred outcome for only one character, and if you have the time and inclination to do more investigation around the house for each remaining family member, you can potentially choose a compromise for another character who didn't get their first preference. Your decisions will have an effect on what happens in the future so choose wisely, and obviously someone will always end up being disappointed.

You play as a ghostly presence within the house - one that can either walk around the house in plain sight (being careful not to get spotted, if playing in stealth mode), or one that can possess the lights/lamps within the house to travel without being seen. You can only be spotted by the family a small number of times in stealth mode per chapter, and after that you lose your ability to influence the choices the family make; however in story mode you can walk around at will which I found to be a much more enjoyable choice for how I wanted to play the game.

In order to find the outcomes for the family members each day, you do this by reading notes/books/pictures that are strewn around the house, and by reading the memories of each family member and walking around the house playing as each character in turn finding clues as to what they would like to achieve.

I found this game to be incredibly atmospheric. From the music to the cell-shaded visuals, it gives a sense of isolation in the big house on the cliff. Seeing how this (almost) visual novel plays out from your own choices I found to be a very personal and emotionally engaging process. I would also praise the voice acting as it really adds to the personality of the characters and the ongoing story.

It is a little frustrating at times having to walk around the whole house at least 6 times if you want to find all of the outcomes/compromises for the characters, particularly when the family are all walking around doing their own thing, but in general that still didn't spoil the atmosphere for me. There were a couple of moments where the outcomes and compromises that I had to pick seemed a little bit unrealistic in terms of how quickly the family could seemingly start to fall apart, but I managed to pull it together enough for each character to get a mostly positive ending for all family members.

This certainly isn't a game for people who want something action-packed, but if you want to be engaged with somewhat challenging decisions, character relationships and atmosphere, this would be a game I'd recommend trying, though I'd maybe wait for a sale to pick this up, as this is a short 2(ish) hour play-through for a £10.99 price-tag.
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A 5 de 8 personas (63%) les ha sido útil este análisis
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Recomendado
6.0 h registradas
Publicado el 29 de abril
In my first playthrough I wrote a novel that was so good it instantly became part of the American literary canon, enjoyed a passionate and sexually charged life with my wife, and screwed up my son so badly that he was doomed to a miserable life of crappy jobs and few friends.

I think I got the good ending.
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A 1 de 2 personas (50%) les ha sido útil este análisis
2 personas han encontrado divertido este análisis
Recomendado
2.5 h registradas
Publicado el 9 de mayo
I always wanted to pretend i was a lightbulb. 10/10.
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A 8 de 10 personas (80%) les ha sido útil este análisis
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No recomendado
7.4 h registradas
Publicado el 3 de abril
I was warned. Saw few bad reviews and decided to play it anyway. I mean how bad could it be? Especially that more than 3/4 reviews were positive?

But believe me - it's terrible.
Gameplay, music, graphics - this is fine. Or maybe i didn't cared.

Game is ruined by it's main rule. Whatever choice you made - there will always be one person happy, one less happy and one totally unhappy. Also author doesn't really understand what compromise means. Also some choices are just stupid.. I mean - how much time you need to play with your kid? Or how much time you have to spend with wife/husband to not turn into strangers? You can spend hour helping you kid to build a car without throwing your work/marriage out of the window. But not in this game. Usually people talk with each other. Thats why they understand others needs. Here we can see letters to friends, boss, other familly members and very limited signs of communication between Kaplan's familly itself. They are rather like 3 selfish cats put in small room than familly on vacations.


IMPORTANT RULE THAT WORKS IN REAL LIFE (consider remembering it as it might be helpful):

HAPPY MARIAGE = HAPPY CHILD
In the meantime I finished game with Dan and Lisa living like on endless honeymoon and having good jobs, while their son was in terrible condition, bullied and living sad life. What the ♥♥♥♥?

Author attempted to show some "adult's live". He failed. This game is bulls***.
¿Te ha sido útil este análisis? No Divertido
A 3 de 3 personas (100%) les ha sido útil este análisis
No recomendado
3.4 h registradas
Publicado el 31 de marzo
To hear the full review, listen to the episode on Game Hoard Podcast

Gameplay
Interestingly, the game offers you two different modes at the beginning, Story and Stealth. Although the core gameplay is the same, in Stealth mode the family can see you and you must remain hidden in order to be able to influence them. You accomplish this by hiding inside light bulbs, for some reason that is never explained. Unfortunately, both modes get tedious. In Story, the game has no challenge to it and it's basically just a mix of "walking simulator" and choose-your-own adventure gameplay. In Stealth mode, you end up spending a lot of time just hanging out in lightbulbs, waiting for family members to walk to another room.

The core gameplay consists of you reading notes and letters left by the family members to find out what they want. You can also read their thoughts and explore their memories. Ultimately, you find out what each person wants and then select who gets their want by touching the object associated with the want. Gameplay then shifts to nighttime mode where you read more notes left by the house's previous owners and can choose a compromise for another family member to at least partially get their want.

There are a lot of unique ideas present in this gameplay loop that I really like. The problem is, what I have just described is the whole game and you have to repeat it for nine chapters with very little variation. What feels very fresh and interesting at the start of the game feels way overplayed and boring by the end, even though the game takes only 2-3 hours to complete. In the end, I felt that the game only really had about 30 minutes worth of ideas and the game felt very stretched and empty as a result.

Presentation
The game has a great cell-shaded aesthetic and the family members all move about and act in realistic ways. I found it immersive in this way where I really did feel like I was observing a real family go about their day. Unfortunately, the graphics suffer the same problem as the gameplay, as being confined to a single house with three characters for several hours means that you are looking at the same boring rooms over and over again.

Sound Design
The music does a good job setting the tone but isn't anything to write home about. On the other hand, the voice acting is great, which really carried the game since it's mostly about listening to the internal monologues of these characters. The actors were very convincing and were able to put a lot of emotion into their lines without hamming it up.

Story
Essentially, the family has moved to a remote summer home so that the father/husband can focus on writing his novel. The mother/wife is unhappy in the marriage and an aspiring artist. Their son is struggling with bullying and schoolwork. It's not the most interesting story but it is very human and the characters feel like real people. It is interesting to see how decisions made in one chapter effect the rest and what ending you get. Also welcome is a "The story so far" feature when you load up the game.

Recommendation
Overall, I felt the game just got very stale by the end but it's still a unique experience that you may like if you want a non-violent, non-competitive game focused on family drama. If you like the "Aspirations" part of the Sims games, you may find something to like here. For most people, however, I think the experience may fall a bit flat.
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A 2 de 2 personas (100%) les ha sido útil este análisis
Recomendado
0.5 h registradas
Publicado el 29 de marzo
The Novelist is a great idea for a game, and it manages to mostly deliver on its premise. The idea of a branching narrative based on the decisions made by the player, interestingly a novelist, is something that has tremendous promise and has generally been carried out well in Telltale Games. Here, in the Novelist, the choices the player makes do, in fact, guide the story though it does so artificially. I say that because the choice the player is faced with are usually those that pit the various family members against each other in situations that would not necessarily present themselves as opposing ideals. While the no-win situations presented in The Walking Dead make sense thematically and situationally, the ones presented here just feel forced.

I do like the idea of the game, and think that this game is actually very well done, despite some of its false feeling delivered by the decisions, and the ultimately tough outcomes the player will receive. Regardless, the decisions you make do create some interesting situations. The graphics are good, the music is fitting, and the game is good for a playthrough or two.
¿Te ha sido útil este análisis? No Divertido
A 1 de 1 personas (100%) les ha sido útil este análisis
Recomendado
3.6 h registradas
Publicado el 27 de febrero
What is The Novelist?

Genre: first person exploration game for adults
Setting: family on vacation trying to solve problems
Difficulty: 3/10 --> basically easy
Length: 2 hours for a single playthrough
Mode: singleplayer campaign


First of all: The Novelist is a game for adults. It confronts you with interpersonal situations you will encounter in your adult life (or have encountered yet). It is about taking responsibility, making decisions and achieving a balance in a family's needs.

You play some sort of a poltergeist observing a family on vacation in a secluded house. The family consists of Dan, father and writer who is facing writer's block and has to finish his latest novel; there also is Linda, Dan's wife and former artist, trying to get a grip on her marriage with Dan and to start over her working career; and there is Tommy, their little boy struggling with grapho legasthenia and the need for playmates.

Now, in every chapter you read their thoughts, find out about each of their needs and have to decide which sounds the most important to you to have this character make a progress. At the same time, the other two will be disappointed. As you can choose another one for a compromise, you might soften negative aspects for one further character.

Eventually the player is absolutely free in his decisions; you can push forward only one character, letting both the other two drop badly; you can try to make them all happy; depending on what you choose the story developes further.

And that is why I would recommend the game: How would you decide? What is your priority? And, in the end, how would you rate your decisions made?

Really worth the price - and even more the experience!
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Análisis más útiles  En los últimos 180 días
A 7 de 8 personas (88%) les ha sido útil este análisis
No recomendado
3.7 h registradas
Publicado el 2 de enero
La verdad es que no sé muy bien qué decir de este juego. No es estrictamente un "simulador de paseos", pero casi y la historia para mi era aburrida y algo pedante.
Eres una especie de fantasma que vive en una casa de verano cerca del mar donde un escritor, su mujer y su hijo van de vacaciones mientras termina su libro.

Aunque intenta hacer que los personajes sean personas normales que afrontan situaciones de la vida real, el mensaje que quiere dar es acerca del compromiso y de como no puedes tener feliz a todo el mundo, pero es que es tan "in your face" que queda completamente forzado. Si trabaja en su libro es porque no apoya a su esposa que quiere retomar su carrera de artista y está dejando de lado a tu hijo que se siente solo y abandonado. Si dedica tiempo a ellos, ya no puede dedicarse a tu carrera. Todo así. Creo que hay ciertos grises y no todo es blanco y negro.

El juego consiste en explorar las 5 habitaciones de la casa y tomar la decisión de que personaje de los 3 se va a salir con la suya, cual va a tener una solución que ni fu ni fa y cual va a tener que aguantarse y frustrarse.

A mi desde luego se me ha hecho bastante cuesta arriba. La trama tampoco es que me enganchase demasiado y leer notas y cartas que escriben una y otra vez se hacia tedioso. Realmente se me ha hecho largo y en ciertos momentos, muy aburrido.

Me he pensado bastante si darle al sí o al no, porque el juego en si se nota que está más o menos bien hecho y hay cariño detrás de él, no es un truño como muchos otros juegos con criticas negativas.
Pero es que a mi no me ha aportado nada, ni me ha hecho involucrarme con los personajes, que es a lo que aspira un juego de este tipo, de hecho, le estoy dedicando más tiempo a esa decisión que a cualquiera de las decisiones cambia-vidas que nos plantea el juego. Para mi, eso me dice que es el juego falla en su máxima aspiración y por ello, le voy a dar al no, aunque puede que sea algo injusto.
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A 49 de 62 personas (79%) les ha sido útil este análisis
No recomendado
6.3 h registradas
Publicado el 3 de enero
"Human beings are born solitary, but everywhere they are in chains - daisy chains - of interactivity. Social actions are makeshift forms, often courageous, sometimes ridiculous, always strange. And in a way, every social action is a negotiation, a compromise between 'his,' 'her' or 'their' wish and yours." - Andy Warhol

The Novelist is a story driven narrative exploration game that strolls around quite loaded terms like choice, goals, drives, relationships, priorities and compromise. The concept that the game revolves around - influencing social dynamics to observe the result of interrelated choices and their consequences - is an interesting and hard to accomplish one. Sadly its presentation within the game both in definition and execution, is definitely flawed.

Here, we take a quick glance at the Kaplans - a family of three going through a though time. Dan is an author who's stressed out to complete the novel that he's been working on, Linda has some worries about her marriage and family ties - also struggles on going back to being a painter. Tommy, their only son is having some adaptation and learning difficulties who needs his parents' attention and support full time. At the beginning of one summer, the Kaplans decide to pass their vacation in a rental villa by the seaside to have some quality time and possibly work through their problems, a villa that YOU reside in... In this detached little game, you are a ghostly entity - who's presence within the house will never be explained properly. You have the ability to stalk, observe and influence the Kaplans, thus deciding the story of this specific family in the end.

The game has two distinct modes: Stealth or Story. In Stealth Mode, you have to avoid being seen by the Kaplans if you'd like to explore everything. If you are seen, they get nervous and focus on their annoyance rather than their actual problems. You are capable of travelling through possessing light sources within the house while you hide from their perception. This mode quickly gets annoying and breaks the immersion of the storyline that you are trying to reveal quite fast. In Story Mode, you are free to roam as you wish without worrying for them to see you, but even excluding that limitation, everything becomes boring and repetitive. You are stuck within the same house with the same tense mood and you basically memorize the possible locations a note may spawn after the second chapter. They never change or surprise you. It is not possible to miss something. You roam around, read notes, watch some memories, whisper what you decided to Dan while he is sleeping and you are done. Another chapter conquered. You only decide whose need is a priority and see the accumulated conclusions in the end.

In each episode - there are 9 in total - you are presented with a couple of conflicting desires of family members. Everyone got different priorities and you must choose one specific desire to influence and accomplish, and maybe another one to half way accomplish through "compromising" which leaves you with one desire completely ignored. This is where things get a bit ridiculous. These 9 encounters oddly end up defining the whole being and interdynamics of a whole family! The definition of compromise in the dictionary is "a settlement of differences by mutual concessions; an agreement reached by adjustment of conflicting or opposing claims, principles, etc., by reciprocal modification of demands". Here, there is no middle ground between parties, no given opportunity to work on different needs, there is basically no settlement. Even real life doesn't work like this! We surely either act selfish or make sacrifices on things little or grand, but a human being is capable of undertaking more than one deed, feeling or accomplishment in a timely manner.

A human being comes with dimensions - which is another huge flaw in this game. The Kaplans are obscenely selfish - without much appreciation for sacrifices or understanding of shortcoming. Their personal desires never seem to even coincide with the desires of others. It is not possible to sympathize with any one of them. Heck, they even do not talk within the same house hold! You are a ghost, stuck within their household for his/her all being and never see them talk more than a couple of automated remarks and some memories. They seem to communicate through written notes scattered around the house. I mean, what kind of family does that?

I surely do understand the limitation of the developer team, thus I won't mumble much about the scenes, the environment and chapters being dull, stolid or repetitive; but I cannot accept the term "compromise" being misused for "forced priority and selfish desire". No remotely eligible father of a small boy would be so consumed with his ongoing artistic pursuit that he'd end up not putting together a toy car that would take 3 hours to assemble for 3 months! This really is ridiculous! So, I personally think this game comes with a possibly good concept executed without much sentimental or even practical depth. Don't get me wrong, I'm all for narrative exploration. I actually love games like Gone Home if they are capable of presenting the echo of an emotion, an idea or at least a state of being. In its current state and price, The Novelist surely doesn't deliver. Wait for a huge sale to satisfy your curiosity if you wish.

Please also check out Lady Storyteller's Curator page here - follow for regular updates on reviews for other games!
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A 11 de 14 personas (79%) les ha sido útil este análisis
Recomendado
1.7 h registradas
Publicado el 16 de diciembre de 2015
Life is hard. Working is hard. Having a family is hard.

The Novelist tells the story of The Kaplan family during their summer break. To which through playing the game you can heavily influence the events of that summer.

THE GAMEPLAY
You are some sort of ghost that when not inside a light bulb you are probably slightly more opaque or corporeal than what the traditional notion of a ghost is. You can either play the game having the Kaplans react and cause you to fail upon discovery or just throw it into story mode and become invisible and focus on the objectives. The ladder is what I did.

The game revolves Dan, his wife Linda and their son Tommy. You explore the home WASD'ing around and teleporting between lights. You must find notes, pictures, documents and items laying about the house; additionally being supernatural (I guess) you can delve into the memories of the characters as well and see what they are thinking at any given moment. Each chapter you'll find clues of what each characters desires are and how they want to go about moving forward. You will choose which (by this I mean whose) outcome you want each chapter and possibly working out a compromise with one other character. My only complaint is that this really, more or less, is just a walking simulator; It might have been served better as a text adventure to be honest.

THE GIST
The outcomes will be very different based on who you decide to “resolve” certain situations with, as well as (if any) you compromised with. I'll tell you right now. Granted, I did not try my very best to keep everyone happy however one aspect of one characters life went exceedingly well. While the rest of that characters life among the rest got sorted out in a very mediocre (almost realistic) but very depressing in its delivery sort of way. Perhaps it was due to summarizing future decades into a few paragraphs. Though to be honest, I guarantee there are far worse endings than I got.

Yeah, its one of those sticky indie art games that you've already made a decision if you like or not. However, this is one of the better ones yet its still not stellar. Its interesting.
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A 6 de 6 personas (100%) les ha sido útil este análisis
Recomendado
2.7 h registradas
Publicado el 25 de diciembre de 2015
In this game you play as a ghostorsomething who can positively interfere with the everyday life of a family.

Every level you explore the house and the minds of the residents (yes, you have mental superpowers) and decide who to help, being careful to not disappoint the others.

I like the idea and the overall realization, although the character design could have been more complex and engaging. Nothing really dramatic happens, and for most of the cases the individual desires you have to support or not with your actions are somewhat stereotypical and repetitive; basically the child wants to play, the wife wants attention and the husband wants to succeed in his work. At least for me, the choices were not very difficult, in the sense I did not perceive them as very strong moral dilemmas.

In my opinion the game can be tried at a low price; it is an original idea and it constitutes an affordance for some kind of phisolophical reflections on the impact everyday choices have on life. Unfortunately, it does not the same for emotions too.

6/10
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A 3 de 3 personas (100%) les ha sido útil este análisis
Recomendado
3.6 h registradas
Publicado el 24 de diciembre de 2015
Above all else, The Novelist succeeds at its stated purpose: to examine the continuous struggle of balancing conflicting needs. Through the lives and thoughts of the three Kaplans, this constant give and take becomes apparent, as does the internal back and forth between their own personal needs. The player is then put into the position of deciding both whose desire will win out and also what individual needs are going to have to go unfulfilled that week. Then they must stand back helplessly while their choices play themselves out. Due to the stress involved, it's likely that more game time will be spent deliberating than exploring or interacting with the Kaplans, which is a good thing as the actual act of playing gets rather repetitive and dull. There is only a single cabin with a handful of rooms to search and an explicitly limited number of things to uncover per chapter. The experience of playing as a whole quickly changes from pleasantly defined to restrictive and joyless.

In addition to guiding the Kaplans, the player is also given the opportunity to learn more about the previous inhabitants of the haunted cabin. Those vignettes, however, end up falling equally flat as they seem to avoid any real answers to the mysterious nature of the player's ghostly presence. But those shortcomings are easy to forgive, and forget, due to the slow-forming, but genuine emotional bond with the Kaplans and how their tangled lives turn out. That is the focus after all, and unless you were taking notes, that's likely all you'll remember about this flawed but brilliant game.
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A 2 de 3 personas (67%) les ha sido útil este análisis
Recomendado
3.4 h registradas
Publicado el 9 de enero
A story telling game that tries to and succeeds at doing something unusual with not only style of graphics but also mechanics. You have to help the occupants of a house find one of 3 happy endings, well actually there are many more possible endings and routes. I hope you love the fresh and well executed way The Novelist lets you make the story your own.

You play the part of a ghost or "sprite" who lives in the lightbulbs and must stay hidden at all times. This adds a hint of tension to the game, but never distracts from the actual storyline. You must weave the story through your decisions, and the game actually is so clever it's actually more fun on the second play-through.
I gave it a 5/5
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A 2 de 3 personas (67%) les ha sido útil este análisis
Recomendado
1.4 h registradas
Publicado el 22 de enero
I haven't finished, but what I played I liked. There are choices, so it's not entirely linear. Proper review will come one day.
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A 4 de 7 personas (57%) les ha sido útil este análisis
Recomendado
3.7 h registradas
Publicado el 22 de enero
6.5/10 - Push and Possess your way to the end

This game is a basic possession game, nothing extremely bad or exciting. I wouldn't pay $15, more like $5.

You are Dan Kaplan, a struggling writer who has taken his family to a remote cabin in hopes of meeting his fast approaching deadline. In this story you push, read minds and possess 3 people; Dan, his wife and son. The choices you make impact not only your life but that of your family.

Worth $5 or so, I purchased for $0.74... So I feel good about that.

Accidently Reviewed
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A 18 de 18 personas (100%) les ha sido útil este análisis
Recomendado
4.2 h registradas
Publicado el 18 de octubre de 2014
La temática del juego es simple: Una familia (padre, madre e hijo) se va a una casa de verano, un lugar de paz donde cada uno podrá afrontar los problemas que le preocupan.

La mecánica también es simple: Afrontar los problemas de cada miembro de la familia intentando resolverlos lo mejor posible.

Lamentablemente, como en la vida real, resolver un problema exige una energía que te impide resolver otros problemas. Así el juego se convierte en una serie de decisiones para dar mayor importancia a unos asuntos que otros y hacer avanzar unos a costa de los demás.

Y lo mejor, no hay camino correcto. ¿Quieres dar un empujón hacia el alcoholismo al padre para que acelere la escritura de su novela? Allá tú. ¿Quieres perder una entrega por pasar una noche con tu mujer y una botella de buen vino? Pues vale. ¿Prefieres que venga un antiguo compañero a casa antes que el único amigo que tiene tu hijo (que por otra parte tiene problemas de adaptación)? Dale colega.

Y lo malo es que, precisamente, toda decisión en este juego tiene consecuencias y no hay escala para medir si lo estás haciendo bien, tan solo tu escala de valores. Si quieres alentar la carrea artística de la madre, ayudar al padre a terminar su novela, ayudar al hijo con sus problemas sociales, alentarle para perseguir su pasión y salvar el matrimonio... mala suerte. No eres un personaje de libro.

En el juego encarnas a la "esencia" de la casa y tienes que ir averiguando las inquietudes de cada personaje para adquirir información y tomar tu decisión sobre qué debe hacerse ante cada dilema. Esto lo consigues inspeccionando objetos que los personajes dejan por la casa (normalmente cartas, dibujos, recortes de periódico...) mientras intentas evitar que la familia te vea.

Seguramente ese aspecto de sigilo sea lo único que tiene de juego este... "experimento narrativo". Yo me lo pasé sin que me detectasen ni una vez, así que tampoco sé que consecuencias tiene que te detecten.

Por otra parte, la historia en si es muy corta (3 horas). Pero si son 9 dilemas y puedes responder de 6 maneras distintas a cada uno las combinaciones para rejugarlo son bastante numerosas. Para mejorar esa rejugabilidad el modo "sigiloso" puede desactivarse, para ver que pasa cuando el padre tira por la borda su relación y la vida de su hijo para terminar su libro :P

Un gran pero que le pongo al juego es que, a pesar de que la idea es tener en cuenta los deseos de todos, el personaje que "controlas" es el del padre, Dan. A Dan es al que convences para tomar las decisiones. Dan es el que dice que se van de campamento, Dan es la figura de referencia para su hijo y Dan es el que tira su matrimonio por la borda.

El juego sería mucho más interesante si consiguiera transmitir la idea de que no solo la vida es muy complicada, sino que en una familia la vida es algo que surge por emergencia entre todas las partes. Al dar a Dan un papel tan central pierde esa perspectiva.

En resumen, no es un juego de puzzles, no es un juego de ganar y realmente no estoy seguro de que sea un juego. Pero si quieres probar algo diferente y que te haga sentir el estrés de una vida ajetreada es muy muy recomendable.
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A 8 de 8 personas (100%) les ha sido útil este análisis
1 persona ha encontrado divertido este análisis
Recomendado
3.4 h registradas
Publicado el 3 de febrero de 2015
Acabo de terminar The Novelist.

Las mecánicas son simples y ajustadas como un reloj suizo para que la historia llegue sin obstáculos directamente al jugador. Desde el principio me sumergí de lleno y disfruté la experiencia de principio a fin. Creo que el hecho de que me sintiera tan identificado con los problemas de los personajes tuvo mucho que ver.

Como para resaltar la atmósfera emotiva, podría decir que a lo largo de este juego se me cayeron unas cuentas lagrimas. Pero no sería suficiente. Otros juegos te ponen un fondo azul, una melodía triste y matan a tu personaje favorito, y lo logran, pero son lagrimas artificiales. The Novelist simplemente expone cuestiones de lo mas cotidianas, y que a la larga son las mas importantes.

Al final, creo que logré un final feliz para toda la familia Kaplan. No siento curiosidad por ver qué otros destinos podría haber determinado para ellos, me hago cargo de mis elecciones. Pero el saber que las cosas podrían haber sido diferentes hace que me resulte todavía más asombrosa esta obra.
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A 5 de 5 personas (100%) les ha sido útil este análisis
Recomendado
6.3 h registradas
Publicado el 1 de agosto de 2014
Es como los típicos "libro-juego", donde vas haciendo elecciones que te conducen a finales diferentes. El juego es muy corto y simple: vagar por la casa buscando notas y tomar decisiones para intentar que el "novelista" y su familia tengan un buen final.
No está hecho para gusto de todos, pero a quien le guste esta clase de juegos, está bastante curioso y te llegas a implicar bastante con los personajes, cada uno tiene sus problemas personales y es prácticamente imposible que los 3 miembros de la familia Kaplan acaben felices con su estilo de vida. Parece que el juego te enseñe que "no se puede ganar siempre en todo".

Para la mayoría de gente, The Novelist resultará muy aburrido, si no son dados a esta clase de juegos emocionales donde no hay acción ninguna.

No tiene logros ni cromos, cosa que se podrían haber currado, en mi opinión.
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A 5 de 5 personas (100%) les ha sido útil este análisis
Recomendado
4.1 h registradas
Publicado el 27 de marzo de 2014
La literatura está plagada de historias sobre escritores, de lugares comunes y de la lucha contra el bloqueo creativo. Autores como Auster, King, Nabokov, Kerouac…todos ellos han escrito una (o más) novela sobre la escritura. También hemos asistido a este recurso en los videojuegos, con el caso más reciente de Alan Wake o incluso con el primer Silent Hill (no se hacía hincapié, pero se presentaba a Harry Mason como escritor). Pero, corregidme si me equivoco, The Novelist es la primera vez en la que la escritura no es un complemento ni un trasfondo, sino la auténtica protagonista del título.

Aunque con algo de trampa. La propuesta de Orthogonal Games no quiere ser un juego sobre la escritura, sino sobre todo lo que rodea la vida del escritor. Sobre los desafíos de la vida cotidiana y cómo ha de hacerles frente alguien que tiene una meta muy clara. Así, ya en la propia página web del juego lanza su afirmación inicial:

¿Puedes alcanzar tus sueños sin dejar atrás a tus seres queridos ?
Quizá pueda lograrse, pero éste no es el caso. Kent Hudson (Deus Ex: IW, Bioshock 2…) nos lanza a una casa sobre unos hermosos acantilados y nos pide que compartamos el lugar con la familia Kaplan. Una familia que está desmoronándose y que se ha dado una última oportunidad: el verano en la nueva vivienda, el cambio de paisaje para cerrar las heridas y relanzar la carrera del padre, Dan, como escritor. La madre, Linda, lucha con sus propios demonios, con una carrera profesional que abandonó para ser madre y con un matrimonio que no está siendo lo que debería. Y el hijo, Tommy, sólo quiere complacer a un padre absorto en su máquina de escribir.

Con un cóctel así, a punto de estallar, seremos nosotros los que decidamos qué va a pasar. Porque en la casa hay otro habitante, una presencia fantasmal capaz de percibir los pensamientos y recuerdos de los protagonistas, de pasear por su historia y ayudar a Dan a tomar una decisión sobre cada conflicto que vaya surgiendo. En total, The Novelist nos ofrece nueve capítulos, que variarán en orden (salvo el primero y el final) cada vez que juguemos. Todos empiezan planteándonos un “conflicto de intereses” y no podemos resolverlo contentando a todos. Por poner un ejemplo: durante el velatorio de la abuela de Linda, Dan es llamado por su agente para una firma de libros y Tommy quiere ir a un show de aviación.

Hay que elegir, siempre. Recorriendo la casa iremos leyendo notas que deja cada miembro de la familia, examinando sus recuerdos y, una vez obtenidas todas las pistas, sabremos qué quiere cada uno. Sólo podremos elegir una de las tres opciones, pero si descubrimos todas, se nos dejará tomar una solución “a medias” con otro familiar: en el caso anterior, ir al velatorio y mandar un avance de la novela a una revista literaria; o ir a la firma de libros y aparecer para el final del funeral.

Cada decisión tiene su peso: si dedicamos poco tiempo a la novela o a actividades que inspiren a Dan, es muy probable que su carrera de escritor se vaya al garete; si no hacemos caso a los deseos de Linda sus ilusiones (y hasta el matrimonio) pueden peligrar y pasar de Tommy…¿habéis visto cómo crecen los niños cuando no se sienten queridos por sus padres? En este juego las decisiones sí que importan. No sólo en darnos un epílogo de entre todos los posibles, sino en la propia convivencia que vamos viendo en la casa. Pequeños detalles, como una cama sin hacer, los dibujos de Tommy o el tono de voz con el que se hablan Dan y Linda nos pueden revelar qué camino está siguiendo nuestra historia.


Porque debe quedarnos clara una cosa: es nuestra historia. El valor principal del guión de The Novelist, está más allá de la historia que nos quiere contar, muy valiosa como entidad aunque peque de poco sutil en algunos momentos. Lo que hace de la experiencia algo superior a lo que nos pueden suscitar la mayoría de videojuegos es la manera que tiene la obra de hacernos pensar. De hacer que nos formulemos preguntas y que empaticemos con la historia. Incluso, de hacer que nos sintamos identificados con uno de los protagonistas. Llega un punto en el que se hace realmente duro tener que elegir, en el que empezamos a pensar en Dan, Tommy y Linda como auténticas personas y los relacionamos con nuestra experiencia. Por el camino, seguro que acabaremos aprendiendo algo sobre nosotros mismos.

No, el título no habla sólo de la escritura. Habla de la familia, del compromiso con otros, de la imposibilidad de tener todo lo que se desea, del daño que le hacemos a los demás con nuestras elecciones y de cómo la vida no siempre sale bien. Lo hace con una madurez y una elegancia que es difícil de encontrar en el género, con una solvencia que recuerda a un titán como Gone Home. Sólo por ese atrevimiento merece la pena ser jugado.

Ahora, ¿cómo se comporta como videojuego? Lo cierto es que deja al jugador elegir cómo lo hará. Ante cada partida se nos dan dos opciones: jugar en el modo “sigilo” o en el modo “historia”. En ambos la mecánica es la misma, recorrer la casa en vista de primera persona, recopilando pistas y accediendo a los pensamientos de la familia. La segunda opción es la más sencilla, porque elimina el desafío y deja al jugador que explore con tranquilidad cada recoveco sin ser molestado. Es la elección menos “jugable”, frente a una primera opción que hace de The Novelist una aventura desafiante: la familia puede vernos y tenemos que ocultarnos poseyendo lámparas y saltando entre ellas para cubrir más distancia, pudiendo jugar con las luces para distraer a los habitantes. Para los que se acerquen a él deseando una experiencia más convencional recomendaría este modo, mientras que a los que les dé igual el grado de interactividad les diría que optaran por centrarse en la historia y en tomar decisiones.


Aunque nuestra primera partida (de unas 2-3 horas) será la que más nos llegue a las entrañas, The Novelist se deja repetir y explorar varias veces más. Ayuda que la sucesión de capítulos sea aleatoria, que de una escena a otra podamos ver los frutos de nuestros actos y una banda sonora de piano que actúa de manera procedural, generando melodías distintas con cada partida. Pero que no os lleve a engaño, no lo hagáis para intentar sacar el final secreto perfecto, porque, al igual que en la vida, no existe.

Al final la decisión es vuestra, pero dejadme que os lo diga con más claridad: éste no es un videojuego cualquiera. Es algo hermoso, un tour de force emocional, una llamada a pensar en nuestras propias decisiones y errores, una masterclass en empatía y madurez. Quizá sea yo, que me identifico con el escritor y mis propias fobias a la hora de sentarme ante una hoja en blanco, pero estoy convencido de que no. De que su esencia está en hablar de la vida cotidiana y sus desafíos, una parcela que todavía está muy verde en el sector. Y lo hace tan bien, emociona tanto, que me veo obligado a pediros que os zambulláis en él. Jugadlo, pero hacedlo con precaución. Quién sabe qué sensaciones os va a recordar.
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A 6 de 9 personas (67%) les ha sido útil este análisis
No recomendado
3.2 h registradas
Publicado el 20 de diciembre de 2013
Si fuese más barato, lo recomendaría como una nueva experiencia, pero lamentablemente, se queda a medio camino. Es una experiencia muy irregular que el jugador muy difícilmente va a disfrutar al 100%, a pesar de que la idea parezca original, todo se hace muy repetitivo.
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