The Novelist asks one central question: can you achieve your dreams without pushing away the people you love? The game focuses on Dan Kaplan, a novelist struggling to write the most important book of his career while trying to be the best husband and father he can be.
Análisis de usuarios: Mayormente positivos (620 análisis)
Fecha de lanzamiento: 10 dic. 2013

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Recomendado por mentores

"Recommended for gamers who love tough choices and multiple endings."

Actualizaciones recientes Ver todos (10)

8 de mayo

The Novelist for $5 During the Humble Spring Sale!

Hey, everyone, just a quick note to let you know that the Humble Store is doing its Spring Sale for the next two weeks.

The Novelist is on sale there for a cool $5.09, and it comes with a Steam key so it's a great way to pick the game up for your Steam library. If you've already got it, tell your friends or gift it to them. :)

Have a good weekend!

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23 de febrero

Trading Cards Come to The Novelist! Plus 40% Off Sale!

Players have been requesting this for quite some time, so I’m very excited to announce that trading cards have been added to The Novelist! There are 6 cards, 3 profile backgrounds, 6 emoticons, and of course 6 badge levels.

It was really fun revisiting the game after a long time away from working on it, and while I’m not sure achievements will ever be the right fit (they might clash with the story content), I think trading cards are a nice addition to the experience.

To celebrate the new feature, I’m also putting the game on sale for 40% off ($8.99). So if you’re looking for some new cards to gather and trade, fire the game up and start collecting!

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Críticas

“The Novelist affected me, deeply and painfully ... I frequently cried at the outcomes of the decisions I made for the Kaplan family.”
Rock Paper Shotgun

“While it arrives on the heels of other notable non-combat, story-based games, it still manages to feel fresh and emotionally resonant. This is thanks to sincere, realistic writing and an inspired approach to player choice, which has you picking sides and making difficult compromises in the context of family conflicts.”
Polygon

“The Novelist is the most personal and beautiful game I have ever experienced. The creator, Kent Hudson, has quite plainly poured his heart and soul into this game, and the outcome is genuinely something to behold. Never before have I felt so emotionally involved in the characters, their situation and potential future, as in this truly player-driven story.”
10 out of 10 – GameGrin

Acerca de este juego

The Novelist asks one central question: can you achieve your dreams without pushing away the people you love? The game focuses on Dan Kaplan, a novelist struggling to write the most important book of his career while trying to be the best husband and father he can be. The Kaplans have come to a remote coastal home for the summer, unaware that they’re sharing the house with a mysterious ghostly presence: you.

Read the family’s thoughts. Explore their memories. Uncover their desires and intervene in their lives. But stay out of sight; you can’t help the Kaplans if they know there’s a ghost in the house. It’s up to you to decide how Dan’s career and family life will evolve, but choose carefully; there are no easy answers, and every choice has a cost.

Dan’s relationships – to his work, his wife, and his son – react and shift in response to your choices. With a different sequence of events in every playthrough, The Novelist gives life to a unique experience each time you play.

The decisions you make will define the Kaplans’ lives, but they may also tell you something about yourself.

Requisitos del sistema

Windows
Mac OS X
SteamOS + Linux
    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows XP SP2 or higher
    • Processor: 1.8 GHz
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: 256 MB VRAM video card
    • Hard Drive: 800 MB available space
    Recommended:
    • OS: Windows 7
    • Processor: 2 GHz
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: 512 MB VRAM video card
    Minimum:
    • OS: OS X Lion (10.7) or higher
    • Processor: 1.8 GHz
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: 256 MB VRAM video card
    • Hard Drive: 800 MB available space
    Recommended:
    • OS: OS X Mountain Lion (10.8)
    • Processor: 2 GHz
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: 512 MB VRAM video card
    Minimum:
    • Processor: 1.8 GHz
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: 256 MB VRAM video card
    • Hard Drive: 800 MB available space
    • Additional Notes: Built with Unity 4.3.4, tested in Ubuntu 12.04 and 13.10
    Recommended:
    • Processor: 2 GHz
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: 512 MB VRAM video card
Análisis útiles de usuarios
A 8 de 8 personas (100%) les ha sido útil este análisis
1 persona ha encontrado divertido este análisis
3.4 h registradas
Publicado: 3 de febrero
Acabo de terminar The Novelist.

Las mecánicas son simples y ajustadas como un reloj suizo para que la historia llegue sin obstáculos directamente al jugador. Desde el principio me sumergí de lleno y disfruté la experiencia de principio a fin. Creo que el hecho de que me sintiera tan identificado con los problemas de los personajes tuvo mucho que ver.

Como para resaltar la atmósfera emotiva, podría decir que a lo largo de este juego se me cayeron unas cuentas lagrimas. Pero no sería suficiente. Otros juegos te ponen un fondo azul, una melodía triste y matan a tu personaje favorito, y lo logran, pero son lagrimas artificiales. The Novelist simplemente expone cuestiones de lo mas cotidianas, y que a la larga son las mas importantes.

Al final, creo que logré un final feliz para toda la familia Kaplan. No siento curiosidad por ver qué otros destinos podría haber determinado para ellos, me hago cargo de mis elecciones. Pero el saber que las cosas podrían haber sido diferentes hace que me resulte todavía más asombrosa esta obra.
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A 1 de 1 personas (100%) les ha sido útil este análisis
3.2 h registradas
Publicado: 31 de mayo
No lo recomiendo principalmente por el precio. Me parece excesivo para lo que es el juego. Además, no me gusta la mecánica. Se acaba haciendo muy repetitiva, y aunque es rejugable, solo pensar en recorrerme la casa una y otra vez se me quitan las ganas.
La idea es original, la historia interesante, y las decisiones a tomar, aunque a veces parecen ridículas o no entiendes por qué tienen que ser eliminatorias, no es difícil abstraerse y pensar que realmente lo que estás escogiendo es una pauta para los siguientes días.
Pero el gameplay me ha cansado enseguida, la casa se me quedaba o muy pequeña, o demasiado grande, según se mire. Y se pilla demasiado rápido la mecánica del juego (el sistema de puntuación que está detrás). Tampoco conseguí que me importaran demasiado los personajes, se hacen bastante odiosos en ocasiones.
De oferta, por menos de 5 euros, podría considerar recomendar la compra, solo a fans del genero. Por el precio normal, en absoluto. Y aquí me voy a repetir: "sobre todo habiendo otros juegos de toma de decisiones mucho más trabajados, como Life is Strange".
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1 persona ha encontrado divertido este análisis
1.0 h registradas
Publicado: 18 de junio
Añadir logros podría resultar más trepidante.
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A 67 de 75 personas (89%) les ha sido útil este análisis
1 persona ha encontrado divertido este análisis
2.8 h registradas
Publicado: 4 de enero
I was briefly torn about whether or not to recommend the game, but after about five minutes of reflection, I can safely say that this game isn't worth buying. Despite having a great concept and being superficially well-made for an indie game, for the brief and predictable story, the asking price is extremely steep. The enticing story-and-gameplay concept is, sadly, completely and utterly wasted. This game could have been made between fifteen and twenty years ago as a college project and would be expected to be distributed for free.

Most of the critique of the game will be about the story, so a bit about the gameplay first. As far as point-and-click adventure games go, this is one of the most simplistic. I've seen -more- simplistic games that I did play, but I can't think of any right now. There are no puzzles, nothing to figure out. You just find all the stuff that glows when you mouse over it, then sneak up behind everyone to see what they're thinking. Playing in stealth mode is a joke, no challenge (even for the minimally competent) whatsoever. The graphics are acceptable for the style (and one might assume, budget). The sound and music are pretty good, but they don't really seem to fit the mood of the game very well. It's sort of like matching up Silent Hill's music and sound with Casper the Friendly Ghost.

The main part of the game is its story, and while I'm not opposed to a cliche setting or starting scenario, sadly the story does not really progress beyond the starting situation. Which is a shame, because the voice acting was pretty good. I played in stealth mode, looked at every interactable object, viewed every memory, unlocked every story option, and was never seen by any of the family members. Finished the game in 2.8 hours, got an ending I would consider 'good', and I have no desire to play it ever again.

Instead of really giving you choices that matter that actually branch out the storyline, the three maladjusted characters are put on a sacrificial altar and the player gets to decide who will get to act all pissy/mopey/whiney this chapter. Some of the 'choices' offered are split between propriety and a non-sequitur option. Not chosing the non-sequitur option has the same level of consequences for the affected character as failing to fulfill social/societal expectations. Additionally, the choices are made for an entire week at a time, but most of the life-altering 'choices' are things that might take anywhere between fifteen minutes and a couple of hours in most of the chapters, or wouldn't be mutually exclusive no matter how you looked at it.

Minor Spoilers: Hilariously, despite being myself in a somewhat similar life position as Dan, I could not find him interesting or identifiable. He's mopey and non-commital, and if I think of Tommy's reading troubles as hereditary, that would explain Dan's writer's block pretty well. I found it so hard not to disparage Linda as a selfish, whiny bellyacher, that I kind of just did. Tommy is a static and boring character, even for a kid. He exists in the story to be the sacrifical lamb whenever you decide talentless Dan should do his job or do apparently incapable Linda's work for her, however more often than he seems neglected, he seems more like a spoiled and undisciplined crybaby with more cognitive deficiencies than poor reading comprehension.

I have problems with the writing for the game, as the game's primary tension is the supposed marital problems between Dan and Linda, which are barely mentioned. The only problems I can see the two having are related to Linda being an implacable whiner who blames Dan for her lack of drive, focus, and ability for most of the game (for perspective, I still got what I would consider the best ending for their relationship). This is made worse by the half-hearted attempts to frame Linda's personality as creative and indepenent using her own words, which make her look hypocritical and even more selfish and listless. While this can be considered a negative personality trait written into the character, I can't help but feel the writer is tacitly implying that women expect their husbands to do everything for them. Personally, I can't stand her the way she is written.

There's never even an insinuation that Dan is writing the book to provide a living for his family, and given that zero of your decisions seem to change which or how the chapters play out, all the more reason for the player to never help him do it unless you think supporting his pride/hubris as a writer is important. The characters certainly never act like the book is at all important to their well-being. That said, Dan's choice is almost always about industriousness, the other two choices are usually about him satisfying the demands of his family, so it would make a lot of sense if you could 'lose' the game by failing to help him write a good book and meet deadlines. Several of the choices -seem- like they would be weighted to give you a better score with both the book and with the family, but that does not actually appear to be the case.

Finally, I did not feel any of the decisions were particularly hard or weighty, and I feel I would not ever have made different decisions at any point in the game. The fully linear chapters and extremely repetative gameplay made my stomach hurt with frustration as I wanted and tried to hurry up and finish. The ending (as with all of the chapter plots) was mundane and predictable. The character outcomes were clearly linked to a hidden score and had no relationship to any of the actual decisions made throughout the storyline.

If I didn't get this game with a bundle, I would be extremely upset about having paid any specific sum of money for the product.

And, there you have it, folks. A review that nearly took longer to write than the game took to finish.

Edit: Clarified the intro paragraph.
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A 11 de 14 personas (79%) les ha sido útil este análisis
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Publicado: 25 de febrero
The Novelist was an interesting concept. The idea that you are a ghost and you affect someone else's story in a good or bad way is really appealing. Unfortunately, for The Novelist, gameplay variety was lacking, the story (which is the main part of the game) was boring and predictable, and the voice acting was meh.

BASICALLY how the game plays out is this: there are three people in the house. The Father, the Wife, and the Son. The Son wants to do stuff with the Father. The Wife wants to pursue art and have more family time, and the Father must deal with that crap while also trying do his work. Every level, something each character desire changes a little bit, and it is your job to find out what everyone wants, and which two people will get what they want.

Also, you must never be seen by any of the residents or else you will not be able to make them happy. So you get to teleport from light fixture to light fixture. The problem is, you can almost get anywhere without going out of a safe-zone light. This makes the game TOO EASY. Though I wouldn't really expect it from a game like this, there is isn't any sort of progression for your ghostly character gameplay-wise, so your ghostly powers stay the same throughout the game.

The plot is boring and uninteresting as well. Half-way through the game, I realized I didn't care for the characters at all. Everyone is so unhappy all the time, and even if you fix all their dang problems, they're just sad in the next level with more problems to fix. It's honestly most fun to just "level up" the dad and make no one else happy. Then his after story makes him a world renouned author who drinks his nights away in misery because his Wife left him and took the Son. You can go through the game and try to make everyone happy by balancing out their wants, but the game part of it is dull, and the story is predictable.

And also, it doesn't look that great either. If for some reason, you are waffling between this and Dishonored, get Dishonored instead. It also has a predictable story where you can mildly affect the outcome, but the gamey side of it is just so much more fun and enjoyable.

Final rating: Meh/10
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