Divekick est le premier jeu mondial de combat à deux boutons. Il dégage l’essence de ce genre de jeu de combat simplement avec deux boutons sans l’utilisation de la croix directionnelle (d-pad). Inclut la mise à jour de Fencer et Johnny Gat !
Évaluations des utilisateurs :
Globales :
très positives (1,448 évaluation(s)) - 85% des 1,448 évaluations des utilisateurs pour ce jeu sont positives.
Date de parution : 20 août 2013

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24 novembre 2015

Fencer Content Update and Price Reduction!

Fencer from Nidhogg has been added as a player character via a free content update for Divekick owners!

Divekick’s price has been reduced in half to USD $4.99!

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Articles

“If you were afraid that the idea of a fighter that's controlled with just two buttons was a joke that would get old quickly, then you clearly haven't played much Divekick!.”
9 / 10 – Destructoid

“Simply put, Divekick is a fighting game that you can — and should! — play even if you're not usually good at fighting games.”
A- – Gaming Age

“It has captured everything we love about fighting games in a mere two buttons. Simply put, it’s genius. This is no joke.”
8 / 10 – Cheat Code Central

À propos de ce jeu

Divekick est le premier jeu mondial de combat à deux boutons. Il dégage l’essence de ce genre de jeu de combat simplement avec deux boutons sans l’utilisation de la croix directionnelle (d-pad). L’accent du jeu de Divekick démontre la profondeur qu’un simple mouvement comporte et introduit (ou renforce) les habiletés fondamentales de ce genre: jeux psychologiques, l’espace, synchronisation et réaction rapide.

Chez Iron Galaxy nous aimons les jeux de combat. Pour la majorité des admirateurs, ce qui rend ces jeux amusants se cache surtout derrière une série de combinaisons d'entrées sans fin qu’ils ont à mémoriser. C’est pourquoi Divekick a seulement deux boutons: "plonger" (en l’air) fait sauter votre personnage vers le haut. "Coup de pied" fait sauter votre personnage les pieds d’abord dans un angle descendant. En utilisant ces mouvements, le premier coup réussi fera gagner le tour et le premier joueur à gagner cinq tours remporte le jeu. Adrénaline pure et sensibilisation assurées! Déjouer vos ennemis.

Caractéristiques fondamentales

  • 14+ personnages complètement uniques et originaux, chacun ayant son propre style de combat et techniques spéciales. Ce qui totalise 91 combinaisons uniques à jouer et apprendre.
  • Inclut la mise à jour de Fencer et Johnny Gat !
  • Une histoire pour chaque personnage incluant une introduction, finale et batailles. Vous en aurez les larmes aux yeux!
  • Jeu en ligne propulsé par GGPO, avec classement ou sans classement. GGPO étant le netcode le plus fiable dans les jeux de combat. Un tableau de classement pour chaque personnage ou de l’ensemble est inclus.
  • Match local VS pour deux joueurs avec reconfiguration rapide et facile des boutons pour qu’une pièce puisse accueillir une multitude de personnalités uniques.
  • Intégration complète de Steamworks, incluant Big Picture Mode.

Couverture Mediatique

  • "How a two-button fighter became the toast of PAX East" Penny Arcade
  • "Divekick is living the dream of diving and kicking. Yes, it is real." Kill Screen
  • "Divekick: The best (and only) two-button fighter." Shack News
  • "Divekick is the Smartest, Most Absurd Two-Button Fighting Game I've Ever Played" Kotaku
  • "Divekick and Sportsfriends turns friends and strangers into rivals." Venture Beat

Configuration requise

    Minimum:
    • Système d'exploitation : Vista or later
    • Processeur : Intel or AMD Dual Core Processor
    • Mémoire vive : 2 GB de mémoire
    • Graphiques : DirectX 10 / DirectX 11 compliant video card
    • DirectX : Version 10
    • Réseau : Connexion internet haut débit
    • Espace disque : 2 GB d'espace disque disponible
    • Carte son : DirectX 10 compliant
    • Notes supplémentaires : OS needs to be updated to have the DirectX 11 Runtime libraries
Évaluations intéressantes des utilisateurs
1 personne(s) sur 1 (100%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
8.7 heures en tout
Posté le : 16 décembre 2015
Divekick
un des meilleures jeu de combat
simple et compliqué a la fois ce jeu melange le style arcade et nouveau
c'est juste delirant fun et on y passe du bon temp alors si vous avait 5€ et que vous ne savez pas quoi en faire acheter ce jeu qui est génial !
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
82 personne(s) sur 113 (73%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
63 personnes ont trouvé cette évaluation amusante
1.9 heures en tout
Posté le : 6 novembre 2015
Dive.

Or kick.

Either way you're going to choke, you colossal fraud.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
29 personne(s) sur 34 (85%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
6 personnes ont trouvé cette évaluation amusante
5.0 heures en tout
Posté le : 12 décembre 2015
I have only ever observed the competitive fighting genre community from orbit. Things like Evo Moment 37 and MAHVEL BAYBEE have been ingrained into Internet culture through osmosis, and while I've never been super into, let alone GOOD at them, I have always admired the passion that the players put into their game(s) of choice.

Divekick is a perfect embodiment of all that energy fans put behind the fighting game scene. The brilliant Kickstartervideos, the silly convention floor demos, the giant two button fight sticks made specifically for the game, and even the game itself all carry that thrill of the fight. Many of the characters and a good portion of the dialog for the various storylines all reference fighting game culture. There are characters based on trolls, players, developers, and even canceled characters from other major fighting game franchises. The game even buys into the whole "guest character" feature ala Soul Calibur and Smash (and probably like 10 other franchises, but remember, I'm not big on fighting games!). Johnny Gat of Saints Row fits right in with the absurdity of Divekick universe, and the new character trailer for Nidhogg's "The Fencer" is a Smash Bros character intro in everything but name.

Speaking of the Divekick universe, Iron Galaxy has built such a silly, lulzy lore to tie this whole concept together. Fighting in this world revolves around combinations of kicking and diving (like, literally their legs are so powerful they can push themselves off the planet and up into the air). Mechanically, there are only two buttons, the gameplay is super simplified but still carries with it quite the meta. Characters are diversified through different angles of attack for diving and kicking, and select characters have additional moves like changing angle in flight, usually at the cost of a movement penalty or something to that effect. The game also employs gems you can set before playing to boost your diving/kicking/meter and some other gameplay modifiers.

The two button mechanic is so basic, but the stakes are just as high as any round of Tekken I've ever played. If you share a love for fighting games, or just want some really silly writing with really silly characters (there's a guy who wears boots on his hands so he can "kick" with his hists), you'd be kicking yourself for not taking a dive into your wallet to buy this game.

Puns.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
24 personne(s) sur 27 (89%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
2 personnes ont trouvé cette évaluation amusante
13.1 heures en tout
Posté le : 22 janvier
It’s all about that one moment. Everyone who’s ever played or watched a fighting game knows it. It’s the final round, both players have a slither of health left and the next move is pivotal; the difference between success and failure, win or lose. Whether it’s playing against a friend, competing in an online ranked match or watching one of the many tournament streams of the fighting game community, everyone knows that one moment. It’s the veritable height of tension, excitement, elation and anguish. Divekick is that one moment distilled into an entire game. Each round of every single fight captures the thrill of those final few seconds in a tightly-contested bout; the moment that entices newcomers to the genre and sends diehard fans into mass hysteria. And it’s all accomplished with only two buttons.

What started out as a simple concept featuring two near-mechanically identical characters and a staple move of 2D fighting games, has now evolved to feature a roster of thirteen that surprises with its hidden depth. It’s odd to say that a game with only two buttons has any intricacy, but therein lies Divekick’s beauty. With one button to jump and one to kick it’s easily accessible for newcomers to the genre. Rounds are a quick twenty seconds and each fight’s nine possible rounds will end after one single hit. It’s the fighting game condensed to its purest form, sans any barrier to entry and welcoming to those dumbfounded and put off by the commitment required to learn the inner workings of the genres best. It’s a test of reads and reactions, of tactically positioning yourself based on your character’s idiosyncrasies and those of your opponent.

You simply jump and divekick, launching through the air to knock your opponent down in their stride.The characters of Dive and Kick showcase this concept at its base level, adopting the roles of Ken and Ryu (even if they are parodies of Yun and Yang) in Divekick’s outlandish universe with the most easy-to-grasp attacks. Positioning is determined by how high you jump and the angle of your kick. Press the kick button when your feet are on the ground and you hop backwards; kick enough and your super meter fills, how you use it depends on your fighter selection. These are simple systems and mechanics that welcome the uninitiated, removing the need to mesmerise button combos. Anyone can pick up Divekick and immediately start having fun, and it’s certainly at its best when played with friends, either locally or online.

However, there is an ever present complexity underpinning this apparent simplicity. Venture away from Dive and Kick and you’ll encounter characters with variations on the simple divekick. The Baz, for example, doesn’t defeat his opponents with his kick but with a trail of lightning that follows it. He can also pause mid-air and alter the angle of his kick, making him very effective if you can adjust to the peculiar way he deals damage. Other characters, like Jefailey, change from round to round. With each win his head begins to grow as his ego inflates, allowing you to jump higher while subsequently increasing the likelihood of suffering a critical headshot that leaves you concussed in the next round, drastically reducing the height of your jumps and the speed of your kicks. Dr Shoals, on the other hand, can perform a trajectory altering kick during her initial attack.

Each of Divekick’s thirteen characters adopt their own unique move lists, terrifically setting them apart from one another. That philosophy continues as you begin to experiment with each fighter’s singular special moves. As you build up the super meter via kicking you can either exert it by using Kick Factor (a parody of Marvel vs Capcom 3’s X-Factor that speeds up your character for a limited time) or by using your special moves. Each character has a ground move and an air move that can be activated by pressing both buttons at once provided you have enough meter. These range from the ability to temporarily float in the air to avoid dangerous situations or to set-up divekicks of your own, to a shoryuken-style Upkick and a handy duck. Though each character shares the same two buttons it quickly becomes apparent how diverse they each are, drawing an improbable amount of depth out of its simple control scheme.

Of course, this welcome complexity does contradict the notion that Divekick is incredibly easy to pick-up-and-play for newcomers to the fighting genre. There’s certainly an amount of explanation required whenever someone new picks a different character and wants to learn their many quirks, but Divekick handily subsides this somewhat with a story mode for each fighter. The AI is a tad on the easy side but these fights offer up a way to learn each character’s move list whilst unearthing their back stories via a handful of short motion comics.

Once you begin to play competitively against other people Divekick’s appeal is at its most discernible. Whether you’re playing locally with friends for a laugh or displaying your high-level skills in a ranked match, Divekick’s mechanics and use of basic fighting game concepts translate well to any environment. Some may write it off because of its simplistic control scheme and visual style but they would be missing the point. It may have slightly deviated from its original design to welcome the uninitiated to the genre – the many, many knowing references reveal a game that’s meant for the fighting game community more than anyone else – but the added depth proves welcome, even if it requires a little more understanding. Divekick is still all about that one moment, there’s just a little more nuance along the way.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante
32 personne(s) sur 42 (76%) ont trouvé cette évaluation utile
3 personnes ont trouvé cette évaluation amusante
2.3 heures en tout
Posté le : 11 novembre 2015
The entire game is controlled with 2 buttons, you can choose these buttons, they can even be ona controller.

The game is simple yet challenging. Great fun with friends.
Cette évaluation vous a-t-elle été utile ? Oui Non Amusante