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You are the Dragon Commander. Your mission it is to reunite a broken empire and become the new emperor. Success depends entirely on your ability to efficiently rule your empire, build invincible armies and lead them to victory.
Release Date: Aug 6, 2013
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Buy Dragon Commander

$39.99

Buy Divinity: Dragon Commander Imperial Edition

$44.99

Buy Divinity: Dragon Commander 4-Pack

$119.99

Reviews

"Colourful, fun and memorable, its elements mesh surprisingly well." - 85% - PC Gamer

"Delightful merger of role-playing, strategy, and action...Dragon Commander is a gem." - 8/10 - Gamespot

"Divinity: Dragon Commander came out of nowhere to become one of my favorite games of the year. Swift, brutal dragon combat paired with large RTS battles works way better than I ever expected it to." - 8/10 - Venturebeat

"Proper strategy, like mama used to make... its loveable nature and repertoire of charming tricks absolutely wins the day." - Rock Paper Shotgun

"Dragon Commander manages to combine all of its different gameplay elements and delivers one cohesive experience that's highly worth playing" - 4/5 - Gamesradar

"Larian has created a unique, engrossing combination of strategy, political choice and rapid battlefield command." - 8/10 - Incgamers

About the Game

You are the Dragon Commander. Your mission it is to reunite a broken empire and become the new emperor. Success depends entirely on your ability to efficiently rule your empire, build invincible armies and lead them to victory. Your secret weapons: your tactical insights, your leadership skills and your ability to turn yourself into a dragon.
Dragon Commander is not just any strategy game - it seamlessly blends real-time strategy gameplay with turn-based campaigning, role-playing an ascending emperor and controlling a formidable dragon.

Key Features

  • Real time strategy: Command your sea, land and air forces in real-time. Combined operations and knowing where and when to hit are crucial elements of any victory.
  • Dragon Combat: During real time strategy mode, you can turn into a dragon to support your troops in combat and obliterate the enemy using your formidable dragon powers.
  • Turn based campaign: Direct your conquest on the turn-based world map; plan several moves ahead, build formidable armies and invest in the right technology or magic upgrades.
  • Rule your empire: You are the emperor and you make the decisions! But beware, political balance is easily upset. Each game is different and you'll find that a Dragon Commander needs to make really tough decisions. Feel the effects of your decisions on the battlefield as the war progresses.
  • Single-player, multiplayer and co-op modes: Play the single player story-driven campaign or test your mettle against other Dragon Knights, online or local via LAN. Start your own multiplayer campaign with or against a friend. Or duke it out on a skirmish map.

System Requirements

    Minimum:
    • OS:Windows XP SP3
    • Processor:Intel Core2 Duo E6600 or equivalent
    • Memory:2 GB RAM
    • Graphics:NVIDIA® GeForce® 8800 GT (512 MB) or ATI™ Radeon™ HD 4850
    • DirectX®:9.0c
    • Hard Drive:15 GB HD space
    • Sound:DirectX9c compliant
    • Other Requirements:Broadband Internet connection
    Recommended:
    • OS:Windows 7 SP1
    • Processor:Intel i5 2400
    • Memory:4 GB RAM
    • Graphics:NVIDIA® GeForce® GTX 550 ti 1GB ram or or ATI™ Radeon™ HD 6XXX
    • DirectX®:9.0c
    • Hard Drive:30 GB HD space
    • Sound:DirectX9c compliant, 5.1 surround sound
    • Other Requirements:Broadband Internet connection
Helpful customer reviews
142 of 151 people (94%) found this review helpful
138 products in account
16 reviews
34.1 hrs on record
What do you expect from this game? Because if you are looking for a good RTS and turn based gameplay, Divinity Dragon Commander isn't the game that's going to scratch that itch for you, even though it employs those mechanics. But if you are looking for a conceptually interesting game, with emphasis on story, character and choices, then I dare say that Divinity Dragon Commander might be worth checking out, if and only if, you are willing to be patient with it and accept the shortcomings of the action phases, meaning the RTS battles.

Divinity Dragon Commander is divided in three parts of gameplay: story and political decisions, turn based Risk-like movement troops on a military map and real-time strategy confrontation during which you can control a dragon. The three phases of the game influence each other in a delightful way: the political decision you make have an impact on all the areas of the map, and the level of bonuses you get from them, depending on the faction to which each county belongs. For example, if you are popular with the elves, your elven controlled regions will grant you more money and will also be more easy to defend. At the same time, it will be harder for the enemy to hold on to those elvish districts. Obviously, should you be less popular, those bonus would become penalties, making the game actually very difficult, even in the RTS sequences of the game, where the number of recruits, and thus units you can build, is tied to your popularity.
But on that point, it needs to be said that the whole game is pretty difficult if you don't know its workings. The learning curve is all over the place. The game doesn't explain the consequence of your political decisions and the nefarious effects of a popularity of zero percent with one or more factions. Worse, going against the wishes of the undead faction, which is blessed by the gods, actually gives you a penalty during automatic battle resolutions, which is bound to happen sooner or later since you can only manage one battle per turn personally. This battle penalty can go pretty high as I found out, up to -26% apparently. I wouldn't necessarily recommend that particular experience. The RTS phases are a lot easier if you compromise you political stance and try to accommodate most of the factions, at least some of the time.

The problems during the battles do not only spring from what the game doesn't establish in mechanics, but also from balancing issues. At the start of the game, you can choose from three dragons, but the differences aren't obvious: the mage-like dragon has more health and better mobility but deals the least amount of damage, whereas the biggest, fastest dragon has the best damage output, but the less health and mobility. The starting skills of each dragon are also different, but since you can unlock every talent for every dragon, it's really a none issue. The problem is that the mage-dragon deals so little damage, that it takes ages to kill anything while the enemy has no problem pummelling that particular dragon to death. Sure, in multilayer, it might make a difference, but for the story campaign, I see no point in going down that road.
Also, on the turn based map, it is possible to build local improvements which in turn grant you cards that you can play before a battle to improve your odds of winning, or granting temporary bonuses to counties. But, from all the dozens and dozens of different cards it is possible to get, very clearly the tavern, which grants you mercenaries, is the best way to go. All of a sudden, you can attack an enemy, one unit against ten, and then just summon a whole army of mercenaries to take care of things.
Besides these balancing issues, there is also the fact that it is possible to carry over gold between acts. There are three acts in the game, and while you are limited in what you can take with you between act I and II, there is no limit between what it is possible to import to act III. While the game puts an emphasis on rushing down opponents, it is well worth waiting a dozen turns at the end of each act to maximise the treasure, the research trees and the cards, stacking up on mercenary ones. The worst part is, winning or, at least for me, enjoying the game, seems to require using these exploits to gain the upper hand against the IA and avoiding most of the dreadful RTS sequences.

Because there is no way around it, those sequences aren't well made. That they are functional is about the only good thing I can say about them. The RTS aspects of it are rather simplistic, and the tactics are seldom more developed than surviving, building a large army and dumping it on the enemy. The fact that it is possible to play as a dragon during those phases is refreshing, and it is nice to fly over the battlefield, helping you troops and raining down fire on your enemies. But this makes it almost impossible to control you troops, managing your army, buildings, etc. So it is constantly necessary to switch back and forth between dragon and RTS controls.
As a balancing issue, -again!-, the speed of the game is a huge problem. It is possible to determine how fast, or slow, the RTS portion of the game can run. This means that everything can happen either twice as fast, or only at fifty percent of the speed. Here is the kicker: the dragon you control isn't influence by the change in pace, meaning that he still moves and attacks at the same speed, regardless of the speed of the enemies. This is completely broken since it means that enemies can dish out twice as much damage to you on higher speed, but only fifty percent on the lowest speed, which makes it also much more easier to dodge. So turning the speed to “slowest” during the RTS section is almost a vital necessity.

But if, on paper, one third of the game is worth rushing through, the rest of it must be that much better, to compensate, right?

From the start, Divinity Dragon Commander pulled me in: the introduction sequence, and it's music, set a refreshing tone for me, as well as the first contact with the generals under your command. The personality, characterisation and style really shines through during those moment. It is the most polished part of the game and the effort shows.
The characters feel almost larger than life, straight out of a play, going through individual arcs with their quirks and personal demons, down one path or another, depending on your guidance. The voice acting is just perfect, I couldn't even think of one thing to improve on in that regard. It hits every mark! The dialogue made me think, it made me laugh, it completely mesmerized me. There is so much personality here, even in the background of the scenes where you make decision (like the amazing skeletal barmaid).
The opinion of the player is asked constantly over subject which are sometimes trivial and funny, or very serious. It is sad to only have two options as choices, no matter the subject, but it does make things more straightforward. Although, you would be surprised how often the obvious choice isn't always the right one. I liked it a lot, but I suppose it requires a certain interest in political issues, if only to catch the jokes, the nudges and the parodies represented here.
I was also very surprised by some of the different issues you get, depending on what you decided earlier. Turning down the imp faction looking to build a giant bomb will result in them coming back with a super soldier project, whereas agreeing in the first place, will only ask more and more of you in the search for the “biggest and badest explosion ever”. Each faction (of which there are five), each general (four in this case) and each queen (again, four) has one of these quests with a lot of multiple branching.

Still, although I enjoyed my time with Divinity Dragon Commander, I cannot justify its full price tag, for what content I liked amounted to not even half of what the game had to offer.
Posted: April 7th, 2014
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51 of 58 people (88%) found this review helpful
116 products in account
34 reviews
22.9 hrs on record
It's different, it's interesting, it's disappointing.

Fighting as a dragon is about as awesome as you might expect, and takes longer to get tired than you might think, especially if you set yourself a good range of skills. You have limited army control in this mode, so can at least fight with a thrash of units under you, radiant in the healing, damage-boosting auras you emit.

But you can basically forget trying to play the RTS as designed, because someone put this on top of a Starcraft-y set of units with lots of manually-triggered abilities. You might occasionally switch your artillery in and out of deployed mode, or tell your tanks to use their short-range sonic burst attack, but not much more unless you forego being a dragon. And then I have to ask why you are playing a game whose main defining feature is that you are a dragon.

One reason possibly being for the challenge (and inevitable achievement). The dragon is basically like spawning with a Supreme Commander Experimental right at the start. You can assert almost total control of any one point on the map. It's rare for an RTS battle to last more than a few minutes, and if you lose it's because you just got overwhelmed by the AI's ability to multitask harder, or bit off such a ridiculously one-sided starting position that you got rushed while the dragon was in its first-minute cooldown.

On the strategic layer, you can only fight personally once per turn, and the rest is up to autoresolves, possibly modified by generals and cards. There's some depth here, especially in picking which fight you want to be your certain win, but nothing to get ecstatic about. Units are almost too mobile, especially naval ones which loop around the map, for territorial control to mean much more than "keep units on every tile". An offensive force headed by your dragon self can steamroll forward so much more effectively than any other that there's limited utility to fighting on multiple fronts.

The diplomatic side is basically brilliant. Characters are well-written and well-voiced, although the fact that every choice is binary is oft irritating; there's quite often no room for moderation or nuance. You probably won't want to put up with the actual *war* part of the game long enough to play it through enough times to see everything, and savescumming a bit just to see branches not taken is confounded by several turns' worth of delays between action and consequences. Turns padded by war.

The ending is flat as a pancake, however. You capture the last key territory, everyone says well done in turn, title screen.

And the multiplayer side? Ridiculously crippled. Pick from one of three predefined dragon loadouts (despite loadout-building being a key fun part of the singleplayer), four players per map tops, no AI dragons, only armies. (It's not much of a spoiler to get the disappointment out of the way and say that nothing of the sort shows up to peturb the mix in the campaign, either. There is no climactic final battle here, just another identikit skirmish.)

Get it in a sale, enjoy the council going at each-other's throats, and divebombing down onto massed enemy forces to unleash a huge firestorm amongst them before swooping around to gather your own army and charging forward into the enemy base with a bellowing roar. The ambience is great. Just expect by the final chapter to be looking at the strategic map with a weary, tired eye that just wants to autoresolve but knows the Imperial Army will blow a 70% chance and get driven back, and occasionally wishing your conversations didn't feel so railroaded.
Posted: May 24th, 2014
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24 of 28 people (86%) found this review helpful
669 products in account
6 reviews
10.5 hrs on record
I can be a social justice warrior without tumblr? Yes
I can be a dragon? Yes
I can get married to a hot skeleton? Yes
I can sacrifice my wives to a demon? Yes

This game was fun, definitely get it when it's on sale.
Posted: July 16th, 2014
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21 of 27 people (78%) found this review helpful
194 products in account
17 reviews
71.5 hrs on record
(Updated due to lack of helpfulness)

It is really hard to say and I mean it REALLY is, but this may just be my favorite game of all time and I have played a LOT of games in my time on this Earth. Divinity Dragon Commander delivers a game with a certain charm about it. (Steampnuk Fantasy anyone?)

1. Let me start with the Music. It is simply Delicious!. It is real good and pleasent to listen to and also a great motivation in battle- least I thought so. I DID NOT buy the imperial edition for the golden jetpack and dragon and concept art, No, I got it for the frickin Delicious soundtrack. (It was only like $1 more for the imperial on a sale.) It was worth it, however it only included 11 soundtracks out of the 24 and it did not include my two most favorite songs. So if you want 13 more bombasticly awesome soundtracks from this game I hope you can do some .WEM file conversion!

2. Graphics are so pretty the only thought that comes to my head is that one fish from spongebob screaming "MY EYES!! MY EYES!!" (if you dunno what spongebob is then I can do nothing but shed a tear for you.)

3. Gameplay reminds me fondly of the Total War games but with like a fantasy twist!, but wait, whats that?? You can be in the battle yourself!? and as a frickin dragon!? Moving units on the map and taking over territory to expand your empire is a thriving desire burning inside me. Build Units, Earn Income, Obtain Research, and interestingly use strategy cards to put luck into your hands!

4. Decision Making. Always a plus in my book and while you can't really tell entirely how your decisions are affecting the world around you it's more or less the thought of it and if you really believe they are. Think of it as kind of reading a book. You have to immerse yourself into it. Into your imagination. IMAGINATION. (Spongebob reference) This may be personal but making these choices based on your point of view personally may just reflect on who you are...PERSONALLY.

5. The Story is long and good enough to keep my attention fully. It makes feel like I really want to be the best Emperor this world has ever seen. (I got to the point I valued my troops lives more then my dragon and would always take point and showering my units with Buffs and Regen to ensure thier survival and to put and end to a battle as quickly as possible.) More then anything though I loved how it made me feel like I really impacted millions of Fantasy Creatures lives as well as humans. That alone to me was worth fighting for.

I end this review with this parting message: We All Have To Face Our Demons.
Posted: June 26th, 2014
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10 of 11 people (91%) found this review helpful
300 products in account
50 reviews
16.5 hrs on record
Very fun game, you tell me a game where you can play a dragon while moving troops, attacking, using abilities all at the same time. When i beat the game, i returned just before i beated the final part, and farmed for about 20min for all the remaining politic achievements, which was around turn 130 >.<
Posted: July 23rd, 2014
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387 of 428 people (90%) found this review helpful
308 products in account
17 reviews
8.1 hrs on record
A good game... Just one that is so strong in one part... And so weak in another two.... I find it difficult to recommend.. I think some will really love this game, and others will bounce off it. I am somewhere inbetween... And after 8 hours, I just felt like I'd had my fill.

There are three parts to this game, the RTS battles where you can take the form a dragon to rain down fiery terror on your enemies while commanding your forces about and building a base... the strategy map where you move your forces around in a turn based environment, very much like the board game RISK.. and the part of the game that I call the Emperor simulator.

For me, the RTS part of the game is the weakest, and ultimately what made me run out of steam and stop playing. I spent most of my time in RTS battles and to be fair they are half decent. The graphics are competent, the AI is good on Normal difficulty and although the units all kinda look the same they are varied in their functions and what they can do. You have land, sea and air units and coupled with the ability to change into a Dragon to help out a crucial time or go on a daring raid to destroy a key building is fun! ....... For a while.

It just becomes stale, at least in my opinion. Granted, I am not an extreme RTS player so maybe I don't have the grizzled veteran stripes that would see me through, but I have finished a few in my time. World in Conflict, a few C&C games, Starcraft 2, Dawn of War.. and similar games... so I feel qualified enough to say that the RTS element of Dragon Commander stops being fun and ends up repetitive and at times... a grind.

Fighting so many similar battles, often on similar maps, repeating similar tactics over and over eventually erodes the fun for me and facing X amount more hours of it isn't something I relish. Most of the time selecting all your units and pointing them to the enemy base tends to work as a tactic, as long as you time it right.

The strategy map is half decent, knowing where to spend your turn by turn income and when to commit your forces is crucial to success... and that part is engaging. No real complaints .. or specific praise about the map. It is clean, functional.. and works. So.. good!

By far the best bit of the game however is playing Emperor. In between battles and troop deployments you will move around your command ship (a big airship powered by a demon) and speak with your generals, learn what makes them tick, settle disputes and do your best to people manage your commanders who are all very different and clearly have different ways of thinking and fighting. You'll also need to manage to needs of the people... in the form of approving or rejecting policies your council proposes.

Things like a national health service, conscription, gay marriage and censorship of the media. The choices you make have direct influences on the war, impacting finances, morale and available troops.

On top of that you also pick a princess to marry from one of the 5 races (I think) in the game, each have their own story arc, wants and needs and of course who you pick and what happens with them throughout the course of your game influence your standing with that particular race and how the others view you also.

It is well voice acted throughout, the characters are well written and they are animated to be full of life and colour. It was a real pleasant surprise!

I feel like I am just scratching the surface on this part of the game, but this facet of Dragon Commander is great... and for me..if they could of attached it to a more fulfilling game... like... well... I'm not sure.. .perhaps a fantasy kingdom manager in the mould of Anno 1404 or something? Rather than this repetitive RTS game... then I think this will have been a classic for me.

Thumbs up ... because it isn't a bad game... however whether you'll fall in love with it or not... is difficult to say.
Posted: November 25th, 2013
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