Betrayer is a first person action adventure game that takes you to the New World at the turn of the 17th century. The year is 1604. You sailed from England expecting to join a struggling colony on the coast of Virginia. Instead, you find only ghosts and mysteries. What catastrophe blighted the land and drained it of color and life?
User reviews: Very Positive (753 reviews)
Release Date: Mar 24, 2014

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Recommended By Curators

"It's odd, it's visually striking, and its one of those "janky but weirdly enjoyable" type of things!"
Read the full review here.

Recent updates View all (16)

November 30

German Translation Added!

A very special thanks goes to Berserkr for all of his generous hard work to make this happen.

Also thanks for everyone's patience as we add more languages - we are not exactly sure when, but the next ones will be Russian and Spanish!

21 comments Read more

October 28

Update v1.7

New Features:

  • Italian translation has been added thanks to the generous help of MarcoCav!
  • Improved gamepad support:
    • Analog movement and strafe.
    • Sensitivity sliders added in Options > Controls for Look and Turn.
    • Map screen can be navigated with the D-Pad - no more tossing explosives
    • when trying to navigate. :)
    • Jump is properly bound to the A button.
  • Store and Inventory slight upgrade - pictures and icons added to make it easier to select what you want.

21 comments Read more

Reviews

“this is absolutely a project worth supporting if you appreciate atmospheric first-person games.”
PC Gamer

“PAX Prime 2013 Awards: Up and Comer Award. Now for the Up and Comer award, our rising star, I'm going to have to give it to a game that dazzled me.”
FPS Guru

About This Game

Betrayer is a first person action adventure game that takes you to the New World at the turn of the 17th century.

The year is 1604. You sailed from England expecting to join a struggling colony on the coast of Virginia. Instead, you find only ghosts and mysteries. What catastrophe blighted the land and drained it of color and life? Where are the settlers and tribes who lived here?

Clue by clue, you must piece together the story of what befell this doomed settlement and find a way to set things right. You will be hunted by corrupted Conquistadors and ravening shadows as you explore an expansive wilderness in order to trace the brief, tragic history of the colony and search for survivors.

Key Features

  • Explore large, open environments teeming with danger and discovery. Chart your own course in search of clues and treasures.
  • Switch between two distinct worlds featuring different enemies, obstacles, and threats.
  • Wield early 17th century weaponry including muskets, bows, crossbows, and tomahawks. Upgrade your arsenal by purchasing or finding faster, deadlier, longer-ranged weapons.
  • Charge headlong into battle with guns blazing or pick enemies off quietly. A novel, movement-based stealth system lets you hide in plain sight or use the wind to mask your footsteps.
  • Equip ability-enhancing Charms to complement your play style, granting anything from extra health to faster movement to improved stealth.
  • Play with the default visual style for maximum eeriness and tension or customize the color and contrast settings to suit your tastes.

About Blackpowder Games

Our ongoing mission is to create first person action experiences that are distinctive, compelling, and memorable regardless of scope or platform. Most of the founders began this quest together over 15 years ago at Monolith Productions and have continued to refine and improve our craft as a team ever since. We expect to continue on this righteous path for centuries to come now that the Singularity is just around the corner.

System Requirements

    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows Vista 64-bit
    • Processor: 3.0 GHz dual core or better
    • Memory: 3 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Graphics: DirectX 9 compatible with 1GB video RAM or better (NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460/AMD Radeon HD 6850)
    • DirectX: Version 9.0c
    • Hard Drive: 4 GB available space
    • Sound Card: Windows compatible stereo sound card
    Recommended:
    • OS: Windows Vista 64-bit / Windows 7 64-bit/ Windows 8 64-bit
    • Processor: 2.4 GHz quad core or better (enhanced for multi-core processors)
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Graphics: DirectX 9 compatible with 2GB video RAM or better (NVIDIA GeForce GTX 560 Ti/AMD Radeon HD 6870)
    • DirectX: Version 9.0c
    • Hard Drive: 4 GB available space
    • Sound Card: Windows compatible stereo sound card
Helpful customer reviews
187 of 194 people (96%) found this review helpful
22.0 hrs on record
Posted: October 14
Betrayer is pretty unique in terms of gaming experience. In fact, I'm not entirely sure it can even be categorised as a 'game' per se... I shall try to explain.

You begin shipwrecked on a beach in 1604; all you know is that you sailed from England to join a colony in the Americas. You are met with an eerie, black-and-white landscape, devoid of colour and, apparently, life. You make your way up the beach, and from there you must begin to explore your environment in order to work out where you are, and what has happened here. Things are clearly wrong in this unsettling place. Your only ally is a mysterious woman in red who doesn't know her own name. Your enemies vary from Spanish Conquistadors with demonic red eyes to bow-wielding natives who utter unearthly howls as they stalk you through forests and grasslands; you barely see them coming before they are upon you, attacking and darting away before you can return fire. When you find and ring the fort's bell, the world around you shifts; just when you thought the daylight was scary enough, the night-world is ever more terrifying with skeletons and ghosts to be found all around you, shrieking in the darkness.

So, scene set, let's start with the basics. The monochromatic graphics are brave and striking; the rendering is gorgeous and you soon get used to looking at this greyscale world, as items of interest are vividly marked in red. But don't be fooled, this doesn't make anything easy to see coming, as realistic wind effects keep the trees and grasses shifting, fooling the eye into seeing movement where there is none, or covering the stealthy approach of a foe. The wind is both your enemy and your ally; you freeze when it blows, for fear that you've seen or heard something moving, or you can dash through the gusts, knowing the sound and movement of the wind will disguise the noise of your approach.

As if this didn't make things tense enough, sound is extremely important. There is no background music and no vocal acting; all you will hear is the wind, and the sounds around you - some enemies can be detected by the clanking of their armour, distincive howls, or gutteral roars. Early on you gain the ability to listen, using your HUD to follow sounds to be led to clues, locations and lost souls in need of rescue. Ring a bell to enter into the night-world and the sounds are amplified; the dull clanging of the bell, the screaming of wraiths, and having to use your listening ability to pinpoint the next clue... Seriously, play this game at night, alone, with the lights off and no other background noise, and you will discover a whole new level of immersion in this terrifying world. It will probably give you nightmares. And PTSD. Especially if there's a sudden noise in the house while you're immersed... honestly, last night, my cat sneezed while I was creeping up on a heavily-garrisoned fort area, and I had three kinds of heart attack all at once.

One of the hardest concepts to grasp in this game is that for pretty much all of the time you will not have a single clue what you are supposed to be doing - or even if you are supposed to be doing anything. Think about it - most games you play will have clear cut objectives, quests and story lines to follow. Betrayer doesn't give you any of that, and to be honest, why should it? It's realism at its finest - in real life, a stranger doesn't approach you in the street and tell you that the answer to all you seek is in the next town, here's a map, speak to so-and-so and report back to me so I can tell you what to do next... Betrayer expects you to behave as you might if you really did wash up on a beach in 1604. Figure it out for yourself! Take a walk - look around - collect clues - piece it together - find scraps of paper - talk to the friendly folk - kill the ones that try to kill you - trial and error; you'll get there in the end. Hopefully...

...Which is why this game gets mixed reviews, it seems. Betrayer will frustrate you as often as it rewards you, because when you're missing a clue and you don't know where to look, then it's hours of map-trawling to try to work out what you've overlooked. There is no handholding here; once you get used to that and start to work things out for yourself you can really start to enjoy it, but this game probably loses a lot of players early on who don't like that style of play. However, the rewards for perseverance are exceptional; intense, involving play; clever use of stealth and strategy; incredible characters and a deeply shocking storyline that keeps you guessing until the end.

So when I said at the beginning that it can't be characterised as a "game", it is because of the incredible amount of realism involved, despite the supernatural themes. It is a media form in its own right; a cross between a game, a movie and a real-life action adventure where you have to work everything out for yourself. Betrayer will not even ask you the questions, let alone tell you the answers - you will literally have to suss everything out for yourself. The beautiful thing is that you will be vey pleased with yourself when you do!

One of my favourite elements of this game was in not knowing where the true evil was; in the deeds of the settlers you learn about, or in the shadowy realm of ghosts and monsters. The irredeemable acts that people do to each other in their own selfish interests and the ways in which those deeds come back to haunt them are intriguing, horrifying and tragic all in one go.

Betrayer is, essentially, a simple game that can be incredibly difficult at the same time. For example, the combat is apparently straightforward in a point-and-shoot manner, but the nature of the weapons and the environment makes tactics important. Stealth is essential in many cases and reload times for muskets, pistols and crossbows have to be taken into account. You can only carry a realistic amount of ammunition so being able to recover spent arrows from fallen enemies is a nice touch and saves your precious resources. You quickly learn the best weapons to use against each enemy, and there is a grim satisfaction to be had in being able to "stealth kill" an enemy silently from a distance using your trusty longbow (my personal favourite weapon in the game) or by sneaking up and throwing a tomahawk at them.

In fact, it is hard to pick fault with Betrayer. Any frustration at not knowing what to do is negated by the fact that it is simply part of the point of the game; you just have to keep searching until you find something that takes you forwards. If you don't like the greyscale graphics, you can adjust the settings of the game so that it is in full colour; personally, I enjoyed the atmospherics much more without any additional colours. If you don't like the eerie silence of the game, you can ruin it with your own background music or something.

My only real nitpick is that it would have been nice to have some voice acting - if the Lady in Red and other "characters" could talk directly rather than using text boxes, then it would have made the game feel even more realistic. The text boxes were, for me, a jarring interruption to an otherwise flawless experience; even the HUD has been carefully considered to be as unobtrusive as possible, and can be turned off for ultra-realistic feel.

Otherwise, I thoroughly recommend this game. This is definitely one for those with patience and tenancity who are looking for a real challenge. It is not something to be played through quickly or for light relief. If you invest some real time in working through Betrayer and give it - and yourself - a chance, then you will not be disappointed.
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74 of 78 people (95%) found this review helpful
15.5 hrs on record
Posted: October 5
Betrayer is a first-person game, where you you awake on a small beach after your ship wrecked.
You are thrown into the game, without any explanation or a real goal first, so you'll start exploring.

Controls are basically like any other first-person game. you can jump, crouch, use your weapons and interact with objects.
So, until here, everything is quite the usual.

What makes it so interesting and unique in my opinion, is the visuals.
Yes, having a game being black and white and only highlight enemies and objects with the color red was a great move. It adds a lot(!) to the atmosphere (you can however play with the contrast, and color saturation yourself to make it colorful again, though i wouldn't recommend it).

After you have made your first steps, you encounter quite mysterious happenings.
Enemies appear and will try to shoot you on sight, but they don't seem particularly human.
After finding and entering your first settlement, you'll find burned corpses and try to find out what happened to these poor souls and then, there is also that mysterious maiden in red, which appears out of nowhere and then there is also, what i call, the "ghost realm" (after ringing the bell ina settlement, everything darkens and you'll end up fighting skeletons and talking to souls, which mostly got murdered).

Together with the visuals, the great sound and the spooky atmosphere it makes a quite good game.
The world itself is divided into larger hubs, where you can roam and explore freely, though, there isn't that much to find (graves, some clues and diary-entries which will give you a bit of backstory and few settlements or smaller places of interest).
You will find (or buy) different weapons throughout the game, like bows, crossbows, pistols and muskets to fight of the enemies (which you should do stealthy in most cases, as you can't take much damage).

The middle part feels a bit stretched and sometimes, it can be a bit frustrating, not knowing exactly what to do and where to go, but if you like exploring and a rather stealthy first-person mystery game which doesn't take you by the hand, then i would definitely recommend this one!
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65 of 75 people (87%) found this review helpful
10.7 hrs on record
Posted: November 5
You begin Betrayer washed up on the shore of the New World, a country rendered in stark monochrome. A linear path leads you inland, acting as a tutorial along the way, but it's once you reach the abandoned Fort Henry that you really begin to grasp what awaits you.Or rather, you don't. Betrayer is the sort of game that delights in keeping you on the edge, never entirely sure what's happened to rid the land of human life or what you're supposed to do about it. It's a game with no missions, no quest markers, no breadcrumb trails. Blackpowder Games, largely made up of former Monolith developers, has dipped into some obvious influences for this stark and striking horror adventure. The Elder Scrolls is one, with an open map through which you navigate by icons on the compass. You'll also sense strong echoes of Far Cry 3. Corrupted, animalistic Conquistadors patrol the wilderness, and since your only defences are crude bows, old-fashioned muskets and a throwing tomahawk, you'll spend a lot of time skulking through long grass, masking your movements in time with gusts of wind and thinning their numbers as stealthily as possible.Should you fall in battle - and you will, since these Conquistadors hit hard and are relentless once they have your scent - you'll respawn back at the fort, leaving all the valuables you found at the site of your death. If you die again before reclaiming them, whatever you found or earned is gone forever.But Betrayer is also an adventure game, of sorts, and one that is driven by mystery and puzzles. Not the crude block-sliding, lever-pulling puzzles that games so often fall back on, but deeper, more abstract problems. In terms of tone and mood it reminds me, more than anything, of the hallucinatory and terrifying climax of 2009 metaphysical viking movie, Valhalla Rising. It's a game that presents exploration as cloying terror and colonisation as a creeping cancer. It's scary, not in the cheap sense, but at a more primal level. You're compelled to explore this land - area by area - but it never feels comfortable or empowering.While Betrayer succeeds in atmosphere, it fares less well in pure gameplay terms. The lack of direction is thrilling, but becomes problematic when the game only marks specific locations on the map.Combat is, sadly, where the game is weakest. The enemies are fairly crude creations, wandering back and forth in fixed, meaningless patterns, and their AI doesn't stretch much further than simply charging at you once roused.Once you've got their attention, they'll follow you across the whole map, displaying only the most rudimentary of tactics - at a distance, they'll use ranged attacks, and up close they'll batter you senseless. Betrayer is rougher around the edges than its stylish exterior may suggest, but it's never less than fascinating.The whole game is a question, intriguingly posed and offering no easy answers.
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54 of 66 people (82%) found this review helpful
8.9 hrs on record
Posted: August 23
I really wish I could recommend this because some aspects of this game are excellent, however there are also negative aspects which really drag down the experience as a whole and make it just mediocre.

The atmosphere and setting are pretty interesting, this being a horror adventure game set in a 17th century colonized America. You will solve mysteries about murdered colonies by finding clues and talking to lost souls in some other dimension, while fighting conquistadors and otherworldly creatures with 17th century weaponry as you do so.

Visually it's also a very pleasing game and it gives you the option to customize how bright and saturated the colours are. So you could play in a completely gray scale world, or make it overly saturated so it looks unrealistic but beautiful, or just go for something realistic in between those.

But how beautiful the scenery in this world might be, its stunning aesthetics are literally all it has. There is only some minor exploration involved in this world, which makes the gameplay feel really bland. It felt like the world of Skyrim, but after having taken out all of the dungeons, sidequests and other interesting things and just replaced them with a few empty colony bases and some things for you to find, which you pretty much are obligated to do to progress in the game. You basically end up doing fetch quests and constantly running around to talk to this lost soul or go find this clue, which becomes a massive drag and will make most people lose interest in the game around halfway in.

I understand the plot reasons for the bases to be empty, and you would imagine everyone being dead to make you feel lonely, but it didn't because there were still plenty of enemies to break that solitary feeling. And if you would actually do different things in all of these bases it would be a lot easier to tolerate, but unfortunately it's just doing the same thing time and time again.

This is all such a shame because everything about it looked so unique and promising, but it really ended up lacking variety in the gameplay and quests to an extreme extent.
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46 of 64 people (72%) found this review helpful
28.2 hrs on record
Posted: July 10
[See the English version below]

Персональный рейтинг - 7 из 10

Есть игры настолько необычные в своей подаче и форме, что даже не знаешь с чего начать. Вот лишь несколько основных тезисов, на которых держится общий сеттинг и атмосфера: эпоха колонизации Америки, испанцы-зомби, души умерших, эффектный графический прием с использованием красного фильтра, девушка в ярко-красном капюшоне... Стоит ли говорить, что Betrayer всегда была для меня "темной лошадкой", которая имела все шансы стать как инди-хитом, так и провалом. Что же получилось?

Формально события развиваются в двух измерениях - обычном мире и в некоей иной реальности, в самой игре именуемой Otherworld, где обитают духи умерших и прочая потусторонняя живность. Способ восприятия этого загадочного мира зависит от вас - разрешается выкрутить яркость цветов на максимум и наслаждаться сочной картинкой, либо продолжать играть, используя монохромную гамму. Признаюсь, от мира цвета полосатой зебры у меня довольно быстро устали глаза, кроме того, двухцветная картинка сильно влияет на видимость, невольно превращая в пиксельную кашу все, что дальше 50 метров. Наигравшись с цветофильтром, я включил режим полной яркости и в дальнейшем ему не изменял.

К слову о графике. Картинка выглядит отлично, сочно и очень ярко. Необъятный лес, в котором герой проведет 90% игрового времени выглядит потрясающе. Он словно живой... порыв ветра, прижимающий окрестную траву к земле, огромные лапы сосен и елей-великанов, качающихся в разные стороны. На местном озере (которое из-за своих крохотных размеров больше похоже на лужу...) сильный ветер заставляет поверхность воды идти мелкой рябью. К сожалению, тут же кроется главный недостаток - однообразие...

Очень жаль, но как бы ни был красив местный лесной массив, но это все что есть в игре. Ни гор и холмов на горизонте, ни смены антуража и времени суток, даже мелкого ручейка - и того нет. Лес, ярко палящее солнце над головой и несколько фортов-поселений без единой души. Впрочем, тут я оговорился. Души там как раз-таки есть и с ними нам предстоит очень тесно контактировать.

Добравшись до специального колокола, мы можем перенестись в упомянутый выше альтернативный мир, где яркие краски отмирают, словно опавшие осенние листья и уступают место темному, жуткому и мрачному миру, где в роли врагов выступают скелеты и прочая нежить. Там же мы общаемся с духами умерших, которые готовы поделиться с нами своими темными историями. Фактически, разбор грехов усопших является вторым столпом на котором держится геймплей. И поверьте мне, истории призраков явно не для детских ушей... Групповые изнасилования, предательство, убийство мужьями собственных жен, смерть детей, сожжение заживо - от местных рассказов кровь стынет в жилах. Впрочем, от местного интерфейса волосы поначалу тоже встают дыбом (и не только на голове) - настолько он ужасен и неудобен...

Я не сказал о сложной боевой системе, об оружии начала 17го века... Боюсь, мне придется закончить на этом... Не хочу вас предавать.
__________

Personal rating - 7 out of 10

There are always games that look so odd and awkward that give you a hard time describing it. Here's a list of key words for better understanding: America's colonization period, zombie-spaniards, souls of departed people, stylish black-white-red effect, maiden in red hood...

Ingame's events unfold in two dimensions - in a normal world and some sort of alternate reality, which the game itself refers to as "Otherworld", where spirits of the dead only linger. The way you perceive the normal world depends on you though. You can stick to overhyped "red filter" mode or turn the colors on and enjoy the bright colorful picture. In my case, monochromic visuals didn't light my fire despite of good stylish looking, so I chose to let the rainbow fill the room and was totally okay with that decision.

Speaking of visuals, they do look great. A bit "soapy", but bright, vibrant and saturated. Huge forest area seems like being alive! Gusts of wind, pressing the grass down to the ground, massive branches of pines and firs, surface of water breaking into dimples. Alas, but this is where Betrayer's most serious drawback lies.

No matter where you go - it's the same. Forest is beautiful, but this is basically all what can be seen in the entire game. No mountains on the horizon, no rivers or even tiny streams, no different landscapes, no day-night circle. Only forest, ever-shining sun and a few forts with no living people inside. Well... people can be found there. Or their souls, to be precise. Once you have reached a special bell you're allowed to ring it and thus migrate into Otherworld, where bright colors and sun die just as fallen leaves die in autumn, giving room to darkness, gloom and dread. We roam the lifeless, cursed lands, fighting ghosts and speaking to spirits who seem to have stuck in this dark world, asking for help. Conducting investigations is truly a second big pillar that holds the gameplay. Listening to spirits and their sorrowful stories ain't easy, that's for sure... Sexual assaults, betrayals, death of children, murder, acts of people being burned alive... The same goes to interface. It's so unhandy, so using it turns into a torture sometimes.

Add harsh fighting system based upon XVII century weaponry to what has been said above and you got yourself a picture of the game. Sorry, can't talk much. Don't want to betray you...
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23 of 25 people (92%) found this review helpful
14.5 hrs on record
Posted: October 1
Betrayer caught me by surprise. I heard good praises about it without querying for details. After completing the game, those praises are definitely warranted. The initial setting of being washed ashore with no knowledge of who or where you are shrouds the player in a mist of mystery. The black & white graphics provide a unique atmosphere. I actually didn't realize you could play the game in color until I was almost finished with the game, but after trying both settings the black & white graphics really adds a sense of creepiness that you don't get with color.

Stumbling upon the first fort location, armored figures can be seen pacing back and forth, standing guard. At first it's really unclear how to approach the situation. Are they friendly? While trying to be sneaky, I was quickly spotted by one who alerted the whole platoon and 12 enemies quickly descended upon me. Goose bumps filled my skin from head to toe as I just turned and ran, my heart pounding as I occasionally looked back only to catch a glimpse of the blood red eyes of my pursuers.

It soon became clear that I could not escape and one-by-one I drew my makeshift bow, adrenaline swelling, and aimed squarely for their heads. One down...then another. Soon, after what felt like an eternity of running and shooting, they all fell before my feet, their red outlines lingering. My heart was able to catch a much needed rest.

And this was only daybreak. More sinister lurkings are waiting in the night...

Betrayer is really a spectacular game, for the first 3 or 4 areas. Then it starts to feel repetitious because all the adrenaline expended killing your first squad starts to become routine after about the 4th instance. So while there is plenty of gameplay, its appeal is lost somewhat quickly. And while there is a grander story coupled with all the action, it gets lost in all the noise (until the end of course).

Overall, it is a fantastic game, although it could have been a lot better had there been more to explore.
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29 of 36 people (81%) found this review helpful
10.4 hrs on record
Posted: November 10
Betrayer is a bag of mixed emotions. Appealingly presented in beautful monochrome and undeniably atmospheric, it's a falling star that will mesmerize you for a moment before its light disippates into night sky.
What do i mean by this ? Well, give me a moment to explain.

Year is 1604 and you just woke up on the beach of the New World among the debris of a marooned ship carrying nothing but your knife. World around you is presented in stylish monochrome with pleasant sounds of splashing waves and schreeching seagulls. It could almost be idyllic if it weren't for the fact that you barely escaped watery grave. With only the vaguest idea of where you are and what to do next, you scrounge up what you can from boxes that are strewn around the shore and head up inland. It doesn' take too long until you stumble on a first sign of life in a form of a warning arrow, shot by a person clad in red. A friendly advice on a piece of paper will introduce you with a opportunistic merchant who provides you with your first weapon and hope of future, mutually beneficial relationship. Wepon in hand, but caution in mind, you'll proceed to face whatever dangers stalk the tall grass of this newly colonized country.
Incidentaly, stalking is the best approach to combat. Your crude longbow won't do you much good in a straight on fight and breasplate worn by your enemies will deflect most arrows. Stealthy approach is very much encouraged - hiding in tall grass and utilizing shadows and gusts of wind to mask your footsteps before you can close in for one deadly strike. However, if you cross their direct line of sight they will spot you and charge to your location which creates a lot of intense encounters, at least in the beginning until you size them up and get better equipment. Like in Dark Souls, you lose all your loot when you die; (an option which can be turned off in gameplay menu), so you want to choose your fights carefully. There is a modest variety of weapons, appropriate for that era. Powerful, but slow-loading muskets and flintlock pistols for your short range, fire-and-forget needs with weaker short/longbows and crossbows doing a nice job at long range sniping. There are also quick-throw explosives and tomahawks when enemies get too close.
Exploration will reveal small bits and pieces of information - page scraps provide lore and insight into past events, puzzling clues an evidence into violent misdeeds, graves engraved with names and causes of death - these are constant reminders that something has gone terribly wrong. Immersion is an overused buzzword, but it's really appropriate here. All this culminates when you reach your first settlement; a small fort mysteriously deserted, showing signs of struggle. Here you'll be introduced to another gameplay mechanic, where you need to collect a bell, hang it from a beam and ring it, whereupon you'll be transported to a darker version of normal world. Dark world is populated by skeletons and floating shades; your vision is limited, and you have to orientate yourself by "listening" and/or following small appearing pointers on the screen. These will lead you to lost souls, remaining echoes of colonists who will explain the significance of certain clues and slowly unravel their mysterious fate and events that led to their untimely, violent deaths.

In these first few hours it looks like Betrayer will settle into a nice rythm, providing a good balance between atmospheric, nearly horror experience, exploration and combat, but it never quite comes to that. New areas you discover feel and look pretty much the same - they're mostly empty and while collectibles offer a decent incentive to explore, it will inevitably become tedious. Enemies that seemed dangerous and sinister before will show all limitations of their AI when you realize there's nothing more to their tactics than relentlessly charging to your location. Most of the combat challenge will come from limited 17- century weapons, and finding more powerful ones is crucial to your survival. These are mostly found on dead enemies or in chests, but really powerful unique, weapons are buried beneath piles of rock that can only be accessed once you find a spade much later in the game. Unfortunately they use exactly the same models as regular ones so it lacks that feeling of finding something really special. Backtracking isn't a problem since there's a fast travel system, but your character is shown as area circle on the map, instead of the usual arrow, which creates confusion when you're trying to find your way, so I'd recommend turning on compass. Ghostly investigations you have to do will reveal very interesting albeit mostly tragic stories, but ultimately amount to nothing more than running from one location to the next, picking up mementos and presenting them to appropriate shade. It's gets very formulaic and repetitive very soon - get to the new area, retake the settlment from enemies, find the bell, go to the dark world, play the courier for ghosts, rinse and repeat. It approaches greatness but never reaches it and that's what's most frustrating of all.


Tenative recommendation. If you approach it from purely gameplay standpoint, you will ultimately be disappointed, but if you take in all the atmosphere and look past its objective flaws, you'll find an enthralling experience. Not really a scary one, but one with uncomfortable sense of unfamiliarty and uknown.
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21 of 25 people (84%) found this review helpful
1.8 hrs on record
Posted: October 8
A friend gifted me this game. What looked to me like yet another pretentious indie game turned out to be an enchanting, eerily captivating experience. For anyone scared of the monochrome look, there's a slider and you can play in color right off the bat.

Combat is a little clunky but manages to still feel intense. The environments, enemies and sound effects make for a blend that is as captivating as it is creepy, even if it's all a little underproduced. The 'listen' mechanic which guides you to the nearest important location in the game will probably give me nightmares for the next month but I think it was worth it.
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22 of 28 people (79%) found this review helpful
8.5 hrs on record
Posted: November 2
Betrayer is an action-adventure game set in 17th century America. Once ashore you reach your very first settlement but find it completely abandoned apart from some human-sized ash figures. The only friend you have is a girl wearing a red cloak. She is looking for her sister and asks for your aid.

While wandering in the forest you encounter conquistadors who attack you immediately. Stealth is very important - especially at the beginning of the game - as you can quietly dispose of your enemies without having to fire your weapon. Initially, you have a bow but soon you'll be able to obtain a crossbow and also a pistol and a musket. These - as the game takes place centuries ago - require quite some time to be reloaded.

I like the atmosphere of the game. I am not sure why the creators went with the monochrome (black and white) art style but it certainly suits the game's atmosphere. In fact, only some key elements show up in red colour such as the things you can interact with and the enemies. Wind blows heavily from time to time which completely conceals the sound of your footsteps. Both the art style and the sound effects deserve a high five!

While the map shows small settlements and roads you can go elsewhere in the forest to find many secrets as it does not reveal everything. There are hidden chests, graves, clues and even unique weapons scattered throughout the land. Later in the game you obtain a shovel with which you can dig at certain places.

Oh, the clues! Every map has a central settlement where you can install a bell. Once rung the game changes your surroundings completely. Everything becomes dark and creepy and instead of conquistadors you fight skeletons and evil spirits. You find good spirits who will always tell you a story. A story of a murder, betrayal, vengeance or something sinister that resulted in the death of the townsfolk. You can then find other ghosts and clues (items) to reveal the background of these killings.

While not necessarily a long game and repetitive at times, Betrayer offers a refreshing experience in the FPS genre with its unique art style and excellent sound effects.

The game never tells you where to go but you are able to "listen". By pressing X you hear a sound effect that is stronger if you are close to your objective and also if you face the right direction. This is a creative way to make you navigate and the creepy sound effect greatly accompanies the haunting atmosphere of the Otherworld.

Highly recommended and do keep the monochrome colouring style as intended!
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17 of 21 people (81%) found this review helpful
13.6 hrs on record
Posted: November 1
It's fairly easy to knock about Betrayer if you approach the game like F.E.A.R or another 'ctrl+C, ctrl+V' shooter, but that is totally on you - not the developers. Rather, this should be played like a point and click game in many respects, with an appreciation for the art style Blackpowder has adopted.

Let's start with that. The aesthetic of the game is obviously fairly distinct and this can be a great detractor for some people. Though there is a colour saturation option (that's right, you can play in colour), it is really not recommended as you lose a great deal of the art style that ultimately shapes the atmosphere of the game. However, I found that bumping up colour to 0.1 was beneficial in many cases as it allows for small amounts of extra detail to be resolved, adding a bit more depth otherwise lacking from homogenous blacks that at times were hard to wrap your head around. Overall it's quite gorgeous, and Blackpowder have clearly optimised the look to suit black and white with a little wiggle room for very minimal colouring.

Weapons are by in large period faithful. Crossbows, short bows, long bows, muskets, tomahawks (no, not the exploding kind), flintlocks and rudimentry grenades make up your arsenal. I read elsewhere someone complaining about a lack of automatic weapons - which reflects more upon their own retardation than a fault of the devs. Each weapon feels distinct, and you'll be conciously cycling between certain ones based on the context of the battle at hand, with things like muskets woeful for close combat with multiple enemies but an absolute cannon for longer ranges. Though the mechanics are overall quite simplistic, the hierachy of weapons and their upgrades mean that you'll rarely be dependent on just a single one until quite late in the game.

Other things to note are the actual quests and storyline. All follow a theme (if you can't guess it, log off and finish off your homework of reciting the alphabet) that can at times be a bit "geee I really didn't see that coming," but remain distinct enough so that if you're genuinely interested in playing the game, you'll recall who-is-who and what-is-what. It may not be the strongest storyline, but it is entertaining enough to see the game through to completion with a twist or two.

Finally, the game follows an open world structure most similar to that seen in S.T.A.L.K.E.R games - with open regions to explore that may be left by only a single route in either direction. Though you can teleport anywhere on the discovered map, I find that it actually is inhibitory to your progress as you miss things like chests, buried charms, quest items and unique weapons that you probably overlooked in the early games. These can actually play a pretty big part in how you finish the game, so keep that in mind.


There are plenty of other things I could mention - like the charms, enemies, stealth mechanics, great soundwork or the otherwordly realm; but those are probably best left a bit hush-hush so you can enjoy them yourself. This is a great game that has been well produced but may at times suffer from acute cases of cliche or confusion. If you approach it not like a shooter, but like a point-and-click adventure, you'll enjoy yourself.
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18 of 23 people (78%) found this review helpful
31.6 hrs on record
Posted: September 26
'Not the stealth game you deserved, but the one you needed'

There is a lot to say about Betrayer. I will be extremely brief and say it's one of the more memorable game experiences I've had, and even playing during daytime, knowing exactly what to expect, this game literally sent chills up my spine and had me in goosebumps during the dark scenes.
And in the day part of the game, it turned out to be one of the simplest and most true to life stealth experiences ever.

I recommend playing with no compass, and using the tiny dot crosshair (it's pretty hard to aim without one). I also preferred turning off the ammo / hp hud most of the time and just went to the menu when I needed it. I wish there was a hotkey to toggle it. Highly recommend you play for a while with the default black/white color until you absorb the feel of the game, then go to color and see how beautifully the world has been rendered. I haven't played all the latest stuff, bu thtis is probably the best looking natural environment I've seen in a game to date.

Highly recommended.
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14 of 19 people (74%) found this review helpful
12.3 hrs on record
Posted: October 30
With a visually striking art style, a genuinely unnerving atmosphere and satisfying combat; I highly recommend this very enjoyable, if slightly repetitive title!
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7 of 7 people (100%) found this review helpful
12.8 hrs on record
Posted: December 1
The short version – Paranormal investigator extrodiaire meets Far Cry.

You appear on a shore, behind you a ship. Likely the vessel that brought you here. A land devoid of color stay for an unpretencious amount of red.

This game is not just visually strking, its stunning. You are given the option to play in shades of grey or blast the color saturation up to see lush forests and gated strongholds.

The actual gameplay mechanics more or less revolve around two things. Exploration and killing things. Through your exploration you are likely to discover chests with goodies, pages with exposition that give insight into the goings on, gravestones among other things. Bascially, it's a completionists absolute dream or worst nightmare. The main draw though is to gain insight into the investigations. About the ghosts.. I didn't mention the ghosts?!

There are two worlds/dimensions to explore, though the same clues and collectables can be found in either. The dark world, the world in perpetual night where hostile undead things will spring forth from underground to ward you off the investigation. Where items must be "cleasned of corruption" before preceeding. And the light or daytime world. Hostile baddies still are here but their purpose seems less warding and more left over neural pathways of repeated and ingrained behavior from their time in life. Very real since of LIMBO here.

Character progression is not necessarily "gated" but there is a very real MetroidVania -esk feel to upgrading your characters weapons from damage, speed of reloading, noise levels, amount of ammo held, amount of water (health packs) and charms that aid in movement speed, reload speed, and enemy detection.

The sound design is absolutely phenominal. Listening to the wind to find your direction. The wind insisting its innocent. Audio cues to detect the natives who are virtually undetectable otherwise. I should mention the wind I speak about is more a button to listen to the wind as the actual wind is used as a stealth mechanic to hinder your noise and detection level. The beasties make crazy scary noises, very distinct ones. To the point of knowing what enemy is behind the bush. The screams are unnerving, you don't really get used to to ambiance, comfortable perhaps, its always slightly disqueiting. Even at the end when I was fully confident in my ability to survive I was still nervous to face enemies to some degree. My only caveat remains that enemies don't react to your shots until their health is completely depleted and become victims to the physics. I just wish you could interupt their attack to some degree.

Overall, one of the most memorable and unique games I've played in awhile.
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9 of 11 people (82%) found this review helpful
14.1 hrs on record
Posted: August 5
Betrayer is a curious game. It's a horror game, with a semi-open world to explore. It's a shooter, but it encourages stealth. It even shuffles some RPG elements in there for good measure. The end result is an experience that's quite unlike anything I've ever played.

The game starts off with you washing up on a beach in 16th-century Virginia. As you make your way inland, you discover the nearest colony has been overtaken by a mysterious force: one that turned the local populace into ashes and changed a Spanish invasion force into feral beasts. You meet the enigmatic Maiden in Red, whose past is tied to this place in ways she cannot yet remember. As you venture through the forests you uncover more abandoned settlements, each with their own history and ghosts left behind to tell it. You'll face a multitude of strange creatures, brought forth by the plague ravishing the Frontier. The combat can get a bit clunky, but the novelty of shooting monsters with muskets and crossbows makes up for that. Exploration can get a bit dull, since the world mostly looks the same. I had to resort to using an online map for each of the game's segments in order to get the full experience.

Each map of the game world is strewn with collectables. These range from journal pages left by the people to graves and clues you find in the wilderness. Speaking with wraiths can give you valuable insight into the tragedies that occured here, even before the world went to hell. There's some interesting stories to be found, and they all receive a form of closure. The way you handle them can also have an impact on the ending of the game, but don't expect the effect to be too great. The ending itself is also strange, and leaves a lot open to interpretation (and the inevitable sequel), but the game's climax is satisfying enough to overlook that.

Betrayer is definitely not easy. The enemies pack quite a punch, even on the lowest difficulty setting. There's not a lot of guides on there online, either, so you'll have to find your own way through the intricate maze of Colonial history the developers have crafted. Figuring it out is immensely satisfying, though, and I'd definitely recommend everyone to play this game.
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6 of 6 people (100%) found this review helpful
8.4 hrs on record
Posted: October 2
Visually rich, mystery/horror game, with an engaging story and highly demanding combat system.
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8 of 10 people (80%) found this review helpful
3.8 hrs on record
Posted: September 26
Spooky Scary Skeletons The Game
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11 of 16 people (69%) found this review helpful
18.2 hrs on record
Posted: November 13
I had my eyes on this game since its very release, back in March. Watching its updates, reading further reviews about its content and gameplay, I saw quite a fair amount of both appraisals and negative criticism. I was sceptical for a while, but the months reinvigorated my interest as I witnessed some clever updates addressing a few issues that were hindering its potential. Then I recently bought it and, about only one week and a half afterwards, I've finished it.

Betrayer is a fantastic indie enterprise, like few I've seen. It combines visual astonishment (directly affecting the atmosphere of ethereal mysteries) with no-nonsense combat, enhanced by the evolution of enemy hordes and also of the player's arsenal and fighting techniques. Running about with musket and bow has never been so much about timing each one's shot and adapting them for the precise circumstances. Missing *your* shot might very easily mean taking the enemy's back at you, since their aiming is relentless, and your health bar, friable.

The theme is reasonably innovative, and the game's approach is downright unique. The year is 1606, and you land on Virginian soil, only to find a very primitive colonial process that has crumbled under inner conflicts and treason. On the other side, Native Americans are hunted, violated and burnt, as the names of their ancestors slowly fade away throughout the narrative process. The several notes found in the game tell (in fairly neat writing) of leaders from both sides being conspired against, sons and daughters being slain or assimilated. The player is then left with a visual that matches the storyline: ghosts float about the dense woods without remembrance of their actual lives, and beg for closure for their sins and/or misfortunes. The player may or may not remind them of who they were and what they did, bringing them either peace or torment. Amidst all this otherworldly saga, the true game's nemeses are embodied by steel-armoured bears (the colonisers) or burnt owls (the natives), which can be interpreted by their roaring or hooting beyond their human silhouettes.

Play this game bearing in mind that it is a heavy experience. Being able to adjust colour saturation and contrast is also a nice feature for atmosphere adaption. If I were to point out a mistake, it may have been the walking and searching necessary to locate clues, letters, chests, and weapons. These are vast forested lands that are excellent for territorial combat, but a bit tedious for repetitive treasure hunt. Apart from that issue, a game that is well worth the cash and is beautiful to explore.
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5 of 5 people (100%) found this review helpful
1.3 hrs on record
Posted: October 17
In the first 10 minutes of the game i found an eyeball, tounge and an ear.

I didnt pay full price for the game however well worth the £4.82 i had paid for it

PROS -
Pretty simple and easy to understand mechanics to the game.
Easy to use combat system much easier if you use sneak attacks than full blow warefare.
Lovely graphics to the game aswell.
A different "waypoint" than most games, you use sound and some graphics on the compass to find your way.
A decent story and side story, the game is very story based, reading new notes you have found ect.

CONS-
The only con i found was with the Controller support jump wasnt asigned to the controller, however it isnt fully supported so we can let them off with that ;-)

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5 of 5 people (100%) found this review helpful
38.3 hrs on record
Posted: October 19
Kinda spooky in the wierd supernatural mode.
Otherwise, this was a cool game the way it was mostly black and white with hints of red here and there.
The unique graphics, however, seem to be pretty much the only thing making this game stand out. It is fun to play, though, and it does have a few interesting mechanics.
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8 of 12 people (67%) found this review helpful
4.0 hrs on record
Posted: November 26
Betrayer is a first person action adventure game that takes you to the New World at the turn of the 17th century. Clue by clue, you must piece together the story of what befell this doomed settlement and find a way to set things right. You will be hunted by corrupted Conquistadors and ravening shadows as you explore an expansive wilderness in order to trace the brief, tragic history of the colony and search for survivors.

9/10
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