Let's spend the next three real-time days together uncovering the mystery of what went horribly wrong on a derelict generation ship, with the help of a spunky/more-than-slightly-traumatized AI sidekick! A sequel to Analogue: A Hate Story that tells a whole new hate story of its own.
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Overall:
Veldig positive (424 anmeldelser) - 87% av 424 brukeranmeldelser for dette spillet er positive.
Utgivelsesdato: 19. aug, 2013

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Kjøp Hate Plus and Soundtrack Bundle

Inkluderer 2 objekter: Hate Plus, Hate Plus Original Soundtrack

Kjøp Hateful Days pair: Analogue and Hate Plus

Inkluderer 4 objekter: Analogue: A Hate Story, Analogue: A Hate Story Soundtrack, Hate Plus, Hate Plus Original Soundtrack

 

Om dette spillet

Let's spend the next three real-time days together uncovering the mystery of what went horribly wrong on a derelict generation ship, with the help of a spunky/more-than-slightly-traumatized AI sidekick!

A sequel to Analogue: A Hate Story that tells a whole new hate story of its own. Analogue players can pick up where their finished save files left off, and new players can start fresh in Hate Plus.

A dark visual novel about transhumanism, cosplay, cake-baking, and the slow patriarchal erosion of freedoms taken for granted.

The story so far...

I can't believe it! My mission was supposed to be routine data recovery on an old derelict generation ship, but instead, I ended up rescuing an adorable AI girl who grew up in a tremendously patriarchal Neo-Confucian society? And now she's discovered a bunch of messages left by the mysterious Old *Mute... and wants me to uncover with her the slow enactment of a regressive political program that caused her society to regress to Joseon Dynasty social mores?!

I wasn't expecting this at all! I thought the three day trip back to Earth would be peaceful and lonely and not at all filled with reading about tragedy!

And so began my hateful days...

Systemkrav

Windows
Mac OS X
SteamOS + Linux
    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows XP
    • Processor: 1.66 GHz
    • Minne: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: DirectX compatible card
    • DirectX: Version 9.0c
    Minimum:
    • OS: OS X version Leopard 10.5.8 or later
    • Processor: 1.66 GHz
    • Minne: 2 GB RAM
    Minimum:
    • OS: Ubuntu 12.04
    • Processor: 1.66 GHz
    • Minne: 2 GB RAM
Customer reviews
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Overall:
Veldig positive (424 anmeldelser)
Recently Posted
dada yaga
( 0.1 timer registrert )
Publisert: 15. mai
too much reading. i can't even read.
 
Helpful? Ja Nei Morsom
naYeeL.kr
( 680.3 timer registrert )
Publisert: 1. mai
Let's get the hell out of here.
 
Helpful? Ja Nei Morsom
Dr. Blutengott
( 11.1 timer registrert )
Publisert: 30. april
I actually made a cake. This is immersive gameplay.
 
Helpful? Ja Nei Morsom
Miyam Rucks
( 10.3 timer registrert )
Publisert: 30. april
Literally made me get up and bake a cake for a computer program in a computer program. 10/10, would reccomend.
 
Helpful? Ja Nei Morsom
🌾 Marcie 🌱
( 4.8 timer registrert )
Publisert: 29. april
*Kudos to the creator for shining light on LGBT!

I have to admit I really like this one a lot better than Analogue: A Hate Story. Not because Analogue was a bad game either, but because this one keeps the story flowing after you wanted so much more from Analogue and I appreciate the creator for resuming the story.

As for the gameplay, it's still a point and click, message reading and desiphering game. You can carry on your data from Analogue or start over with your own preferences on how you want the game to begin and who with. I carried mine over, so I can't say much about starting with *Mute or a new route.

The soundtrack is still subtle but very nice to drown out to, and the character development only grows from here. It's a game you will get engulfed in and completely forget your surroundings.

One thing I'm washy about is the real time effect (waiting 11 hours between intervals to resume the story) but it does stretch out gameplay a lot more and makes it more enjoyable to come back to a greeting from Hyun.

It's hard to review it in one light, because to each their own. I highly recommend Hate Plus and Analogue though. It's worth at least trying out to see if you like it.

As Hyun stresses, it's not just another anime harem simulation, but focuses more on the story while balancing your relationship with Hyun and/or Mute (which you can be nice, or a total a-hole to them both, though Mute will probably tell you off). It's funny and cute; what else can I say?

* My review on Analogue: A Hate Story.
 
Helpful? Ja Nei Morsom
Lyonesse
( 18.7 timer registrert )
Publisert: 20. april
This game is a sequel to "Analogue: A Hate Story" and for a better experience, I really recommend you to not play it before playin' it's prequel.

The "Hate Project" (Analogue + Hate Plus) is pretty different from the usual visual novel formula. It isn't focused in dating or romance, but it consists in a needed and mature cross-cultural reflection with elements of feminism all over the main plotline. It does a perfect criticism of the patriarchal system, which is a needed reflection since a lot of it's traces remain in our modern society - and we should eliminate them as soon as possible.

You will play as a space explorer who was hired to investigate the wreckage of a long lost space ship whose disappearance has been a mystery for ages. The ship is inhabited, it's crew is long dead. The only remnants of life are two AI programs called Hyun-ae and Mute. Together, you will dig through the archives, records and digital letters from old members of the crew trying to piece together where and why everything went wrong.

Hate Plus is another heartwarming and unique Visual Novel experience, as Analogue. If you're a fan of Visual Novels with deep plotlines, I definitely recommend you to give this dramatic masterpiece a try.

WARNING: Avoid this game if you don't like heavy reading, because this game is all about reading (and re-reading) tons of texts and try to put small pieces of plot together. Also, if you are an achievement hunter this game might be trouble for you, since it has one impossible to get achievement.
 
Helpful? Ja Nei Morsom
kristastrophy
( 1.9 timer registrert )
Publisert: 3. april
I can tell that this is one of those games that you just absolutely love and dream about away from game (one achievement is to bake a real-life cake), or a game that you don't understand why anyone likes.

I don't really fall into either category.

I like narrative based games--and this is, after all, a digital novel--but the narrative simply doesn't capture me. The mode of narration, the concept, and the executaion are all excellent. I appreciate the clear differences in voice and interesting action occuring in the various logs the player reads with the AI. It is also a original way to present a narrative--at once one the player is part of through the interactions with the AI and the log interface, while remaining completely isolated from the narrative being read. I see why it's a game frequently talked about.

In the end, PLAY IT because it's an interesting premise--even if you don't play much of it.
DON'T PLAY IT if you won't like to read a digital novel
 
Helpful? Ja Nei Morsom
Get-Laid Man
( 12.9 timer registrert )
Publisert: 30. mars
Extremely emotional, great characters, great story. Definitely worth the time and money.
A great visual novel and one of my favourites, matched only by the original; Analogue: A Hate Story.
 
Helpful? Ja Nei Morsom
SecretSarah
( 11.1 timer registrert )
Publisert: 20. mars
Like the previous game, the story is almost entirely kinetic but good, though not as good as the first game imo. Just as before, you need to play two endings in order to get all of the story pieces, which is tedious in a kinetic story.

A new "feature" of this game is that it limits you to a certain amount of content per real-world day. I would much rather choose the amount that I want to play in a day based on my real-world schedule and my mood. This was not optional and it ♥♥♥♥♥♥ me off.

I also had issues with the interface. The story panels did not respond to my scroll wheel or arrow keys so I had to manually slide the scroll bar with my track pad. This may seem like a minor complaint but there is a lot of scrolling involved and it was irritating.
 
Helpful? Ja Nei Morsom
specificinstance
( 2.0 timer registrert )
Publisert: 19. mars
Making gameplay dependent on time in the real world is cute, unless you have a day job and don't want to try and schedule game time around your real world schedule just to accomodate a designer's whims. It looked promising otherwise.
 
Helpful? Ja Nei Morsom
Techbane
( 4.0 timer registrert )
Publisert: 17. februar
No, I am not going to bake an actual real-life ♥♥♥♥♥♥♥ cake because my oversensitive anime tour guide's feelings are going to be horribly hurt if I don't. What's that? Most of the story is walled past this point? Well ♥♥♥♥ you too!
 
Helpful? Ja Nei Morsom
toontown tears
( 9.8 timer registrert )
Publisert: 13. februar
this is misogynistic why should a woman like me have to bake a cake? you're literally telling women to get back in the kitchen ugh. baked the cake anyway. this game made me feel like i was being ♥♥♥♥♥ because i felt actually sorta stressed to make the cake cause of the guilt trip and stuff... this is kinda like misogynistic men pressuring women into having sex and telling lies. thanks for the virtual ♥♥♥♥. disgusting dev.
 
Helpful? Ja Nei Morsom
[GoC] Col. Mustard
( 7.1 timer registrert )
Publisert: 9. februar
While the plot isn't always my cup of tea, Christine Love has to be given credit for actually improving on Hate Plus's predecessor in terms of the graphics and music. Not only that, it's probably one of the few games out there where it takes roleplaying to the next level, requiring you to patiently wait in real life in order to access a new batch of emails or while you bake a cake. For those without patience, having to wait before continuing with the game will seem like an infuriating gimmick; to the rest though, it's a brilliant way to further immerse the player into the world of Hate Plus.

http://www.choicestgames.com/2016/02/hate-plus-review.html
 
Helpful? Ja Nei Morsom
HAUHAU
( 11.7 timer registrert )
Publisert: 8. februar
Compared to_Analouge: A Hate Story
+Interface(not UI) (improved digital mood)
+Graphic visual (*Hyun-ae, *Mutes, Background Colors)
+BGM (makes delicate tension)

-Bonus content (logs, commentary, cliparts)
-Language (Korean translation)
-Achievement(*MUTE!!!)

...and yet this NOVEL is amazing 9/10
 
Helpful? Ja Nei Morsom
MindfulOcean
( 6.5 timer registrert )
Publisert: 17. januar
If you played Analogue: A Hate Story, you owe it to yourself to buy and play this one too. If you haven't played the first one, go and play that first because this is a direct sequel in every sense of the term. It's shorter than the first game but features multiple routes and some intriguing gameplay choices. Also, unless you are a monster and have no feelings, please be prepared to bake a cake while playing.
 
Helpful? Ja Nei Morsom
RisingSolarSoul
( 12.5 timer registrert )
Publisert: 15. januar
This is a really wonderful gem that everyone interested in visual novels would enjoy. Unlike in the first game, the developer threw a lot of rules out the window, and the game was better for it.

Pros: Beautiful storytelling, multiple choices that lead to multiple endings, very novel 4th wall bending design choices

Cons: Really does require a previous playthrough of the previous game in the series to fully enjoy. The game makes a lot of references that would go over newcomer's heads. There's also another ending which is impossible to get without the previous game as well.

Beautiful!
 
Helpful? Ja Nei Morsom
*****
( 10.3 timer registrert )
Publisert: 8. januar
TL;DR: Like its predecessor "Analogue: A Hate Story" but with a better UI and more to look at.

This is a visual novel/narrative experience game, set in a sci-fi setting with a lot of mystery, romance and politics. It picks up after the original "Analogue: A Hate Story" via some quick multiple-choice about the way you ended the previous game - however you don't need to have played the previous game to appreciate it, in fact that would probably work better from the mystery angle. There are two possible companions, *Mute who is extremely traditional and *Hyun-Ae who is more flexible and open; both serve just to comment on the text that you read and very occasionally ask questions for a bit of branching narrative. Most of the gameplay is picking which email to read next and then reading through it so that you can work out what actually happened in the central catastrophe which is the main subject of the game.

The game limits how many emails you can "extract" at once, and once you've reached a certain number it'll declare the day over (this kind of makes sense in-game), encouraging you to literally wait until the next day until playing further. It's conspicuously designed to be immersive, and the wait is an element of that. Each "day" takes probably about 1 to 1.5 hours to run through, so it has an extremely casual pace, and the game takes place across three "days".

The content includes convoluted politics, a surprising amount of homosexuality, and some mildly explicit content. The secondary characters - the authors of the emails - are pretty interesting, and the pictures make them fairly easy to remember.

You might reasonably assume that there are romance plots with the companion characters; that's true but they are optional and not very extensive.

So, it's a somewhat immersive mystery experience. Good if you like mysteries, not so good if you like a lot of interactivity.
 
Helpful? Ja Nei Morsom
Mr_SkiZZeX
( 17.3 timer registrert )
Publisert: 3. januar
...This is even deeper game than previous one. I'm speechless. If you feel like you want to cheat fate, join "Level Four Revive Materia Project" group on steam.
 
Helpful? Ja Nei Morsom
Pushing Gaywards
( 11.8 timer registrert )
Publisert: 26. desember, 2015
This series really is something special. This visual novel is a sequel to "Analogue: A Hate Story", and takes place moments after it. Gameplay remains similar while telling yet another story with dark and mature themes.

The story has you managing your remaining power on your 3-day trip back to earth, while you uncover the mystery of what happened "before year 0" onboard of the Mugungwha. The game lets you pick your wai-- I mean companion AI, and even how they act towards you (If you have a finished save file of Analogue you can load it and it will remember things, like how you acted and all). While the routes have you reading similar log files, their reactions and "break conversations" are unique and different, and you'll experience a different perspective of the story.

I'm being relaively vague in this review, as I don't want to spoil any possible surprises. Just know that this story tackles some themes you might not generally see in a visual novel, and you will probably find yourself conflicted and questioning things often.

It's a very unique story with many feels and laughs. It's definitely a series I've come to really enjoy, and hope there might be more at some point in the future. Highly recommended if you want a short, but very unique and interesting visual novel.
 
Helpful? Ja Nei Morsom
Posted up on frank block
( 3.1 timer registrert )
Publisert: 14. desember, 2015
I baked a cake to appease my waifu who is also only half real in the in game universe
 
Helpful? Ja Nei Morsom
Most Helpful Reviews  In the past 90 days
8 av 8 personer (100%) syntes denne anmeldelsen var hjelpsom
1 person syntes at denne anmeldelsen var morsom
Anbefalt
4.8 timer registrert
Publisert: 29. april
*Kudos to the creator for shining light on LGBT!

I have to admit I really like this one a lot better than Analogue: A Hate Story. Not because Analogue was a bad game either, but because this one keeps the story flowing after you wanted so much more from Analogue and I appreciate the creator for resuming the story.

As for the gameplay, it's still a point and click, message reading and desiphering game. You can carry on your data from Analogue or start over with your own preferences on how you want the game to begin and who with. I carried mine over, so I can't say much about starting with *Mute or a new route.

The soundtrack is still subtle but very nice to drown out to, and the character development only grows from here. It's a game you will get engulfed in and completely forget your surroundings.

One thing I'm washy about is the real time effect (waiting 11 hours between intervals to resume the story) but it does stretch out gameplay a lot more and makes it more enjoyable to come back to a greeting from Hyun.

It's hard to review it in one light, because to each their own. I highly recommend Hate Plus and Analogue though. It's worth at least trying out to see if you like it.

As Hyun stresses, it's not just another anime harem simulation, but focuses more on the story while balancing your relationship with Hyun and/or Mute (which you can be nice, or a total a-hole to them both, though Mute will probably tell you off). It's funny and cute; what else can I say?

* My review on Analogue: A Hate Story.
 
Var denne anmeldelsen til hjelp? Ja Nei Morsom
1 av 1 personer (100%) syntes denne anmeldelsen var hjelpsom
1 person syntes at denne anmeldelsen var morsom
Anbefalt
11.1 timer registrert
Publisert: 30. april
I actually made a cake. This is immersive gameplay.
 
Var denne anmeldelsen til hjelp? Ja Nei Morsom
1 av 1 personer (100%) syntes denne anmeldelsen var hjelpsom
3 personer syntes at denne anmeldelsen var morsom
Anbefalt
10.3 timer registrert
Publisert: 30. april
Literally made me get up and bake a cake for a computer program in a computer program. 10/10, would reccomend.
 
Var denne anmeldelsen til hjelp? Ja Nei Morsom
Most Helpful Reviews  In the past 180 days
8 av 9 personer (89%) syntes denne anmeldelsen var hjelpsom
Anbefalt
11.8 timer registrert
Publisert: 26. desember, 2015
This series really is something special. This visual novel is a sequel to "Analogue: A Hate Story", and takes place moments after it. Gameplay remains similar while telling yet another story with dark and mature themes.

The story has you managing your remaining power on your 3-day trip back to earth, while you uncover the mystery of what happened "before year 0" onboard of the Mugungwha. The game lets you pick your wai-- I mean companion AI, and even how they act towards you (If you have a finished save file of Analogue you can load it and it will remember things, like how you acted and all). While the routes have you reading similar log files, their reactions and "break conversations" are unique and different, and you'll experience a different perspective of the story.

I'm being relaively vague in this review, as I don't want to spoil any possible surprises. Just know that this story tackles some themes you might not generally see in a visual novel, and you will probably find yourself conflicted and questioning things often.

It's a very unique story with many feels and laughs. It's definitely a series I've come to really enjoy, and hope there might be more at some point in the future. Highly recommended if you want a short, but very unique and interesting visual novel.
 
Var denne anmeldelsen til hjelp? Ja Nei Morsom
3 av 3 personer (100%) syntes denne anmeldelsen var hjelpsom
Anbefalt
7.1 timer registrert
Publisert: 9. februar
While the plot isn't always my cup of tea, Christine Love has to be given credit for actually improving on Hate Plus's predecessor in terms of the graphics and music. Not only that, it's probably one of the few games out there where it takes roleplaying to the next level, requiring you to patiently wait in real life in order to access a new batch of emails or while you bake a cake. For those without patience, having to wait before continuing with the game will seem like an infuriating gimmick; to the rest though, it's a brilliant way to further immerse the player into the world of Hate Plus.

http://www.choicestgames.com/2016/02/hate-plus-review.html
 
Var denne anmeldelsen til hjelp? Ja Nei Morsom
Most Helpful Reviews  Overall
444 av 533 personer (83%) syntes denne anmeldelsen var hjelpsom
231 personer syntes at denne anmeldelsen var morsom
Anbefalt
4.0 timer registrert
Publisert: 6. desember, 2014
Remember to just have 1 waifu
-Getting more waifu will destroy your laifu.
 
Var denne anmeldelsen til hjelp? Ja Nei Morsom
98 av 105 personer (93%) syntes denne anmeldelsen var hjelpsom
Anbefalt
24.2 timer registrert
Publisert: 26. november, 2013
Hate Plus is a different kind of game, and that's not a bad thing if you are looking for something new to try. Instead of being a puzzle, adventure, or action title, it is literally an interactive novel. The only "puzzle," if you will, is attempting to piece together what happened to space vessle Mugunghwa before the events of the previous game, Analogue: A Hate Story. Because there are some concepts originally introduced in that game, it's helpful to have played it before diving into Hate Plus, but it's not essential.

If you completed Analogue, however, you have the choice of either importing data from your save files or starting clean. How the story progresses and the interaction with your on-screen sidekick is completely dependent on which of the two AIs from the previous game you are partnered with--or if you are partnered with both. *Hyun-Ae is an adorable and somewhat naive girl with a big heart and an extremely tortured history (see Analogue for the whole story); *Mute is a security AI who is much more abrasive and sometimes struggles to fit in but interesting in her own right.

The "game" aspects of Hate Plus are minimal, even more so than in Analogue. The only things you do are choose from a series of log files to read, address your AI when she wants your attention, and generally read along with your sidekick. I'm not a person who likes to read books anymore, but presented in this format, the reading is engaging and fun. But don't take this to suggest that this is a PG story for anyone to read as there are many mature themes and outright NSFW topics discussed within some of the logs.

But perhaps the most fun is with interacting with your chosen AI. She will ask you to click on her from time to time to ask a question or discuss something with you; often, you'll be presented with a wheel of possible responses. There's no right or wrong, but how you answer definitely can influence her perception of you. If *Hyun-Ae is your sidekick, you'll even have the opportunity to bake an actual CAKE for an achievement. (Unlike Portal, this cake is NOT a lie.) And if both *Hyun-Ae and *Mute are along for the ride, their banter together is really funny at times.

In a game like this, presentation is everything, and Hate Plus does not disappoint, with charming graphics for the two AI's, a nice, clean interface serving as the ship's computer console, and an excellent soundtrack by Isaac Schankler, who also composed the music for Analogue. My favorite song of the soundtrack is called "Vision," which is heavily played during the playthrough with *Hyun-Ae. It's a beautiful song, one I find myself listening to quite frequently OUTSIDE of the game. I've heard very few video game songs that I can listen to in that way (the theme "Icarus" from Deus Ex: Human Revolution being one of the only others). It's hard to imagine a better interface or a more listenable soundtrack for the content of the game.

I did find a few minor faults with the game, however. One is the fact that after you download so many logs, you have to save your progress and quit. This is a mechanism built into the game design; the number of logs you can pull is directly linked to the power remaining in your character's ship, and when it drops to 1%, you have to end the game, thus giving the batteries time to recharge for the next session. This takes 12 real-time hours; there IS a way to circumvent this if you want. It's an interesting mechanic and not entirely artificial as it's linked to the story, but it would be nice to not have to use what amounts to a cheat to bypass it if you want to spend more time reading through the story. Additionally, I found control non-responsive more than in Analogue; I'm not sure if this is a problem or if it's another mechanic linked to the whole low-power-on-the-ship aspect of the story, but it's a minor irritation, though not one that I would consider off-putting.

And then there's the possible red herring of an achievement: Level Four Revive Materia. To this day, it appears NOBODY has been able to unlock it based on Steam's global stats (I checked this again before writing this). I've researched this on-line along with a number of other players, and it appears this achievement is not actually possible. However, there has been no word from creator Christine Love about this that I am aware of. I don't consider myself an achievement snob, but for anyone who would like to 100% this game on an achievements level, this may be off-putting until a way to unlock it becomes more clear. In that regard, anyone who considers achievements to be an important part of the experience should approach with a degree of caution.

UPDATE AND SPOILER ALERT, 7-29-2014: A new article on Kotaku confirms that this achievement is 100% IMPOSSIBLE to obtain: http://kotaku.com/the-steam-achievement-that-nobody-unlocked-1610073943

Another possible turn-off for some is the straight story aspect of the game. Even Analogue presented one fairly frantic and involving puzzle around the middle of the game in which you used that game's console to enter a series of commands to stop a nuclear meltdown. Hate Plus does not include any true puzzles at all, with the possible exception of a sequence between you and the two AIs if both are accompanying you; I can't say more without revealing a MAJOR spoiler. But those looking even for minor brain-teasers or anything other than straight reading and interacting with your AI(s) may not enjoy Hate Plus as much.

But for anyone willing to approach with an open mind and take a chance on a relatively new gaming concept, there's a lot to love about Hate Plus. Put it this way: Analogue and Hate Plus are just about the ONLY games on Steam I have paid full price for without waiting for a sale, and the demo for Analogue hooked me on the idea almost immediately. Granted, the games are not expensive to start with, but the fact that I was willing to pay the release price is a testament to how much I like Love's ability to craft this type of video game. I'm looking forward to more such games from her in the future. Hate Plus is definitely a winner.

8.0 out of 10
 
Var denne anmeldelsen til hjelp? Ja Nei Morsom
107 av 120 personer (89%) syntes denne anmeldelsen var hjelpsom
22 personer syntes at denne anmeldelsen var morsom
Anbefalt
3.1 timer registrert
Publisert: 15. november, 2014
An ex-terminally-ill Korean AI girl from the distant future used this game to emotionally blackmail me into making an actual honest-to-god IRL cake. 10/10 would recommend.

(Basically, it's the Portal 2 to Analogue's Portal. If you like actual engaging characters (instead of flat VN stereotypes), moral ambiguity, tragedy, mostly fanservice-free lesbian and gay relationships, futuristic spaceship dystopias, political maneuvering, reading other people's letters, or cake, buy this game. You won't regret it.)
 
Var denne anmeldelsen til hjelp? Ja Nei Morsom
83 av 90 personer (92%) syntes denne anmeldelsen var hjelpsom
1 person syntes at denne anmeldelsen var morsom
Anbefalt
21.7 timer registrert
Publisert: 28. mai, 2014
Hate Plus is the only game I've ever played - the only piece of media I have ever consumed, actually - that has made me willingly wake up at 8:00 AM on a day off, shower, shave, get dressed, get in my car, drive to the supermarket, buy ingredients for a chocolate cake, drive home, bake the aforementioned cake, take a picture of me eating said cake with a digital 3000-year-old 640-year-old teenager, and email said picture to a Canadian woman with pink hair.

(By the by, playing Analogue first isn't necessary, but it helps.)
 
Var denne anmeldelsen til hjelp? Ja Nei Morsom
53 av 57 personer (93%) syntes denne anmeldelsen var hjelpsom
Anbefalt
12.4 timer registrert
Publisert: 2. mars, 2015
Most of us take it for granted that our society is getting ever more liberal. But if you look at various cultures throughout history, there are actually many instances of relatively egalitarian societies slowly morphing into socially stratified class systems, often drastically reducing the quality of life for a large segment of the population. Few people talk about the fact that this is something that can happen, and even fewer talk about why.

This is just one of the many uncomfortable questions that Hate Plus, the sequel to Analogue: A Hate Story, raises.

Originally planned as DLC before morphing into a half-sequel, half-standalone-expansion, the story of Hate Plus is deeply interwoven with the one of Analogue. It would make little sense to play this one before the first, and in fact, I would go as far as saying that you should play Analogue before you read this review for the best spoiler-free experience. I will also draw more comparisons than I would for most other sequels, so if you are unfamiliar with Analogue, much of this review might be useless to you. You can find my review for Analogue here.

The plot of Hate Plus picks up right where its predecessor ended, with you, the space investigator, having recovered the documents and one of the A.I.s from the Mugunghwa. You can either continue from an existing Analogue save file, or you can start a new game and decide right then which of the two A.I.s you brought with you, who will then accompany you on your three-day journey back to Earth. She offers to investigate with you the contents of some mysterious files. As it turns out, these files detail the fate of *Mute's previous instance from before the computer crash and the Mugunghwa's descent from a thriving postmodern society into a despotic and totalitarian implementation of Joseon-inspired principles. They cover several individual lives throughout the years as well as some of the changes in the political machinery and the intentions of the people pulling the strings into different directions, and of course, how their political actions lead to societal consequences. Your job is, once more, to find out the truth.

Compared to Analogue, this game makes a much stronger visual impression. Instead of the black-on-white look from before, it goes with a striking (if still largely monochromatic) color scheme, mostly using lighter text on dark tinted backgrounds. The character sprites have seen an expansion of their palette of poses and facial expressions, making them even more expressive. Long documents are no longer paginated, instead there is free-form scrolling. Texts are imbued with hyperlinks pointing you to "photos" of the important characters, which is certainly a big help in keeping track of the abundance of political actors. You no longer have to activate the A.I. after reading a document, instead she always accompanies you throughout the texts and comments as you go. Even though plot contrivances still prevent you from any bidirectional free-form chat, this change produces a more noticeable aura of companionship and teamwork from which the emotional investment strongly benefits. The soundtrack is unobtrusive but on point and comes with a wacky, ironically self-aware theme song.

The player freedom regarding the order in which the story is explored is so much bigger that it is almost impossible to overstate. If you felt artificially constrained by Analogue, you might be happy to hear that the game gives you almost no direction whatsoever. You just pick some files whose titles sound intriguing and hope that you can piece together the events and causalities after the fact. I would argue that the pendulum may have swung too far into the "player freedom" direction, as it is easy to ruin any dramatic arc and feel completely lost by choosing the wrong files early on or skipping some important ones for too long.

Your companion A.I. choice has a significant influence on the delivery of the story. Since the events documented in Hate Plus take place while the Pale Bride is still in cryogenic sleep, *Hyun-ae only has a very vague knowledge of the circumstances and a low personal investment, which manifests itself in a more easily distracted and less attentive demeanour. I would recommend *Hyun-ae's route if you are looking for a more playful and cute experience instead of a heavier emotional hit. If Analogue is *Hyun-ae's story, Hate Plus is *Mute's. The former security A.I. has a noticeably better (but still fallible) grasp of society before and after the crash, and she is more strongly invested because her previous instance is a main character in the story. Even if you were initially put off by *Mute's behavior in Analogue, I would recommend her route in Hate Plus if you really want to dive in and get the full experience.

One interesting mechanic that bears mentioning if only for its controversy is the real-time break enforcement. Since you are reading the files throughout your trip back to Earth, you are twice met with a mandatory break time of twelve real-world hours, to sleep and recharge the ship's batteries. From what I've seen, many people are understandably critical of this design choice. However, I personally believe that I benefitted from the extra time I had to let the details sink in. I also know myself well enough to say that I likely would have binge-played it if this mechanic had not been in place, and I would be remembering it with less clarity right now. I understand how it might feel weird to not be solely in charge of your game pace, but I would encourage you to simply go along with it.

With much of the game being rooted in plot exploration, there is little of the story that I would want to give away here. It is more or less like Analogue, but even more intense, detailed, and shocking. The stronger focus on political intrigue (which the Pale Bride was mostly shielded from in Analogue), the engine improvements detailed above (even if the scrolling often feels rather jerky), and the overall more competent writing leave me in a position where I have to conclude that I liked Hate Plus even more than Analogue. Both titles have strong character writing and a compelling mixture of moods, but the sequel stands out thanks to the extra effort that went into it. Don't play it before Analogue, but if you liked that one, I can't imagine you being disappointed by Hate Plus.
 
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Publisert: 27. august, 2013
Cake Baking for Waifu Simulator 4989
 
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Publisert: 1. november, 2013
Hate Plus is the sequel to "Analogue: A Hate Story" from 2012, continuing the story between you and your computer wife, or just a friend side investigator. After loving the previous game, can the sequel step up to the plate and be just as good? Or even better?! Perhaps...

Story: The story is focused on the events after Analogue, with you traveling with your selected A.I. partner to Earth and finally finish your mission, however it's 3 days long and the dialogue option is messed up just like last time. Luckily, your A.I. friend finds some logs about the history of the Mugunghwa before the Pale Bride (events of the first game). The game still has *Hyun-ae and *Mute, luckily not having to complete half the game this time to pick your character to playthrough with like last game. The logs in the game are even better than the last, it focuses on the previous events before the Pale Bride incident and has Old *Mute involved, a previous A.I. security version of *Mute, and your job is to find out what happened exactly to Old *Mute and the ship before the Pale Bride. Just as the previous game, the title sticks through the entire game. Hate Plus. It's a game that you'll find to be sickening with certain events, and it has many hateful characters and moments (In a good way!).
Same as Analogue, Christine Love shows us how superb she is at writing as the logs you sift through have an emotional punch to them all, and tells a little tale for each of the characters you read about, as some logs are just diary pages or even council meetings. Many logs are hard to read for either hateful reasons, or pure sadness; which Analogue did do, however, I feel that Hate Plus delivers an even more emotional tale with *Mute's side of the story, never before have I had such twisted emotions in a game and long after completing, I was still thinking about the events that occurred in the logs, along with the events that were happening with me and my A.I. wife.

However I feel as though *Hyun-ae's side is a bit too...cheery, or off topic. *Mute's side is figuring out what was going on with her old self, and how she's going to cope with the events from the past, however *Hyun-ae consists of cake baking, chatting, and just being lovey to each other. I suppose it's expected since *Hyun-ae was the focus in the previous game, however even *Mute in the previous game was more focused on the story as well. That's the only issue I have with the story here, but with *Mute's side, it's just perfect.

Gameplay: Surprisingly, the gameplay here in a visual novel style game, has improved quite well. Unlike the previous game, your A.I. partner reads with you with each log and gives you their thoughts on certain things in the logs while reading it. It gives more realism since in the previous game you would just talk to them after and didn't know if they were reading it with you, or they already read it beforehand...

There is one other major change than in the previous game. You have a certain amount of energy to download logs each day, ones you've downloaded all you can in one day and read them all, you have to power down and it's a literal 12 hour waiting process. For some, it was a bad choice, taking away the reading from the player for nearly the rest of the day. However I feel like it was a sensible choice and I was able to think things through more, just to focus on one day instead of trying to cram all the info of the entire game in one play session.

Whereas most gamers this year are picking The Last of Us, BioShock Infinite, GTA V for their GOTY. I'd have to safely say, no other game this year has been as amazing as Hate Plus in my eyes. No other game has twisted my emotions this much or had such an impact on me. While Analogue is an amazing game, Hate Plus is just a few steps away from being a perfect title. If you haven't played either, I suggest picking both up. I guarantee you'll be loving every second of it....and hating every minute.

9.5/10
 
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Publisert: 20. november, 2014
God damn it, *Mute.

A word of warning: If you're easily depressed or heartbroken, DO NOT play this game on *Mute's route. To everyone else, enjoy, but be warned it'll be a pretty disturbing journey. I rarely recommend games, but this one is definitely worth it.

...damn it, *Mute...
 
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Publisert: 19. august, 2014
This is a pretty good little conspiracy and if followed sequentially you get a taste of what's coming in day 1, get a glimpse of the end in day 2, and in day 3 you see it from the conspiracy side. It's a sad little tale where really, no one is happy and the "heroes" lose. I liked that there's not really a big event that's the cause; wheels were in motion before the logs you start reading, and you feel those wheel get a little oiling during the course of events, then turn some more. There's no magic gas or anything behind it all.

The problem is it's less of a game than Analogue. You have enough power over the three days for every log, every single one. So why make me pick? It's completely pointless, you may as well just have fed them to me in a set order. In the original you had a log percentage and you felt like you were investigating, unlocking new avenues as you passed logs to your AI companion. There's none of that there, you unlock the next six logs, read them, then repeat with the next six and so on until you run out of power. There's no reason not to read them in sequential order.

There's also a lack of variety. You had the terminal in Analogue to mix things up a little, plus the bit with the reactor added a little drama to the proceedings. Here it's just so... bland. You read logs, then shut down. Repeat for three days.

There isn't a climax to the story either. You just run out of logs. Contrast that to Analogue where you find out why the Pale Bride doesn't speak, or why everyone on the ship is dead.

It isn't helped that Hyun-ae's route is so unchallenging. There's no conflict, no drama, no tension. How can a relationship survive between someone in a screen and someone in the physical world? Won't the investigator eventually leave her? ♥♥♥♥ that, here's a message about AI bodies to completely dissolve any potential for dramatic tension. The opportunity is also completely missed to draw parallels between your relationship and that of Mute and her security lieutenants, the way she had seen them come and go. What happened when you died and Hyun-ae lived on? Nope, nothing. What about charges against her for her actions on the ship? Nope, answered, no tension. What about her being part of the contract and thus taken from you? Ignored.

Hyun-ae and the story are just completely disconnected from one another, and the new log format doesn't help. She doesn't make any substantive contributions to the narrative, just little one liners here and there, generally along the lines of "harsh" or some such.

I even felt the music wasn't as good this time around.

I hope and pray that when I do it with Mute further down the line that it will be better, because there's someone with a more personal investment in events. There's also that achievement for reading all the logs again on day 3 with her, which would suggest she reviews them in a new light.

I should be interested in the replay, but I can't get enthused. In Analogue I didn't need to re-read logs I still remembered, I could pass them straight to the AI to get the new content. You can't do that here, and I'm not sure I can face the idea of slowly... scrolling... through... every... log... again. It's a game designed to be replayed which isn't designed to be replayed. Or played at all really.

The game really only does one thing better and that's that it ties the side characters more tightly into the story. In Analogue you could know nothing about the Smiths and it wouldn't change a thing, but here all those people provide a window into how society was changing, and the impact it had on people.

I come out the end of this really disappointed. There's a good story underneath it all, but it misses every opportunity to be more.
 
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Publisert: 11. januar, 2015
Forced to bake chocolate cake with AI waifu 10/10

Play Analogue: A Hate Story before playing this however, as this is a direct sequel to it.
A very engaging visual novel, I wanted to keep playing until the end so I can get my happy ending. The only problem I have with this though is how real life time dictates when you can play the game on the "next day" again. I guess to add a level of realism to it.

10/10 would bake chocolate cake again.
 
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Publisert: 7. september, 2013
Hate Plus picks up where Analogue: A Hate Story left off and continues expanding on the backstories and society of AIs *Hyun-ae and *Mute that may not have been so clear in the original game.

First and foremost, Christine Love's writing has improved leaps and bounds from the original game. There's a much sharper focus on fleshing out both characters and how the changes in the world directly and indirectly impacted their existences. Navigating through logs and the myriad of often confusing Korean names is made much easier thanks to a cleaner interface that features cross-linked profiles and portraits of the key players in the story.

There's no reason not to grab Hate Plus if you enjoyed Analogue. It's a much richer and fulfilling experience, and all the loose ends come together as they should.
 
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Publisert: 22. juni, 2014
Plot is not quite as good as the first one but it has a lot of cool extra stuff. I highly recommend playing Hate Story before this, even your save gets imported to Hate Plus.
 
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Publisert: 19. september, 2014
Oh, *Hyun-ae, let's solve mysteries together forever~

Hate Plus is a fantastic... something between a visual novel and a kinetic novel. Both this game and it's predecessor, Analogue, aren't a tangled spiderweb mess of routes, choices, decisions, Good and Bad Ends. There aren't many branching decision points in these games (Hate Plus doesn't even really have any), which kind of removes a lot of their "gaminess." That's okay with me; the visual/kinetic novel genre exists somewhere in the digital melting pot between traditional literature, comic books and video games. That's pretty great, in my opinion.

I won't go into the story because it would be rife with spoilers, but I'll talk some about the game itself. Hate Plus is even more linear than Analogue, which is okay. The bulk of the "gameplay" is spent reading over recovered logs from the derelict generation ship Mugunghwa. You've got the assistance of whichever AI you either choose or carry over from your Analogue clear data. Depending on the choices made in Analogue or when starting a new game, you may have a different relationship with either *Hyun-ae or *Mute.

The meat of the game's story is told through the logs and the AI's commentary on the logs. Because your ship was damaged somehow, you have a limited amount of data you can sift through every 12 hours, which forces the game to be played over a period of at least 39-ish real-time hours (though you can circumvent this, but the author will call you a "jerkface"). Every time you read through six logs or read a log that's very significant to the plot, your AI partner will want to discuss something with you. Depending on your progress, this could either be a discussion about your relationship or about the mystery of the Mugunghwa's reversion to a primitive Neo-Joseon culture. Occasionally you'll receive a message from your employer or other people, usually while you are extracting new data from the encrypted logs.

And that's pretty much the extent of the gameplay. There really isn't much "game" here; it's entirely about the narrative. And that's okay. The narrative is excellent; Christine Love is a fantastic writer. As a writer myself, she makes me jealous. The logs and your progress through them are carefully metered so you're slowly drip-fed the main story while seemingly being distracted by random bits and pieces that don't seem relevant. They become very relevant later.

The plot itself, like its predecessor, is seriously messed up stuff interspersed with little rejuvenating isles of humor and heartwarming. While I was going through the game (I was playing *Hyun-ae's route; I intend to finish *Mute's route eventually) there were many points where I desperately welcomed *Hyun-ae's insistence that we stop and chat. Some of the stories you read in the logs are soul-crushingly sad. Spending time "talking" with *Hyun-ae and her generally ridiculous levels of adorable sweetness balanced out the intense tragedy of the story from the past. I haven't completely finished *Mute's route, but her "breather episodes" seem to largely be composed of humor (and that's great, too). As the plot progressed further and further, the hopelessness of many past characters' situations started to press heavily upon me, drawing me deeper and deeper into the self-contained world and its terrible drama.

That isn't to say Hate Plus doesn't have problems. It has problems. The "real-life" time limit is my biggest personal gripe, even though you can circumvent it. As a general rule I hate it when games try to control the rate at which I play them. I can't stand turn limits, limited numbers of saves, save points, diminishing returns on experience points gain (I especially hate daily quests in MMOs, but that's a rant for another day). My second-biggest problem was the UI seemed to be very sluggish in responding to my mouse commands. Scrolling through the logs seemed to take far more "spins" of my mouse wheel than I would need to execute to scroll a web page in Chrome, for example. I was spinning the mouse wheel so much my index finger started to get a little numb! I tried lots of keyboard keys in an attempt to find some other way to scroll, but nothing seemed to work. Trying to grab the slider didn't work, either. Occasionally clicks on UI elements wouldn't register. I don't think these issues were part of the "interface screw" from the ship's low power and damage.

A lot of people seem to have another major gripe: the infamous "cake" sequence in *Hyun-ae's route. To be honest, I actually loved this part. Partly because I really did find it completely, adorably cute, and partly because it gave me a brief respite from the soul-crushingly depressing things I was reading. I happened to be playing at 3AM, but I still went in the kitchen and made a cake (it was pretty tasty, so it worked out). I understand why the developer chose to add this, and I can understand and appreciate why people would be annoyed by it, but I really loved the fact that it was in the game.

Hate Plus is a fantastic visual novel and I'd recommend it to almost anyone, especially fans of science fiction. The plot will make very little sense if you haven't played Analogue, however, so I recommend buying them both and playing them both. Don't let the poor "hours of play per dollar" ratio scare you off; there's some really great story here!

I will warn you though that if you suffer from massive testosterone poisoning, you will probably find both games to be very uncomfortable. Both can be aggressively girly, especially on *Hyun-ae's routes. For me, that's a big win. The gaming industry as a whole is completely dominated by titles that are aggressively hypermasculine. It's nice to have something that more caters to my side of things.
 
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Publisert: 4. januar, 2014
Sequel to Analogue: A Hate Story
Your waifu is now capable of reading things for you if you're that lazy.
What will it cost you? Well you'll have to bake a cake for your waifu.
No, I'm not kidding, you better be good at baking things.
Well, there's still things to investigate, but don't forget to bake a cake. Seriously. Don't.
 
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11.9 timer registrert
Publisert: 9. november, 2015
Awesome Game. Just one thing:

GIVE ME ALREADY THAT IMPOSSIBLE ACHIEVMENT DAMMIT!
 
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