This world is a Machine. A Machine for Pigs. Fit only for the slaughtering of Pigs. From the creators of Amnesia: The Dark Descent and Dear Esther comes a new first-person horrorgame that will drag you to the depths of greed, power and madness. It will bury its snout into your ribs and it will eat your heart.
User reviews: Mixed (2,761 reviews)
Release Date: Sep 10, 2013

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Includes 2 items: Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs, Amnesia: The Dark Descent

 

Recommended By Curators

"A Machine For Pigs is a very different game than The Dark Descent. But it is not lacking in quality."

About This Game

This world is a Machine. A Machine for Pigs. Fit only for the slaughtering of Pigs.

From the creators of Amnesia: The Dark Descent and Dear Esther comes a new first-person horrorgame that will drag you to the depths of greed, power and madness. It will bury its snout into your ribs and it will eat your heart.

The year is 1899

Wealthy industrialist Oswald Mandus awakes in his bed, wracked with fever and haunted by dreams of a dark and hellish engine. Tortured by visions of a disastrous expedition to Mexico, broken on the failing dreams of an industrial utopia, wracked with guilt and tropical disease, he wakes into a nightmare. The house is silent, the ground beneath him shaking at the will of some infernal machine: all he knows is that his children are in grave peril, and it is up to him to save them.

Unique Selling Points

  • Fresh and new approach to the Amnesia world while staying true to its origins.
  • The darkest, most horrific tale ever told in a videogame.
  • Stunning soundtrack by award-winning composer Jessica Curry.

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
SteamOS + Linux
    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows Vista
    • Processor: High-range Intel Core i3 / AMD A6 CPU or equivalent.
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Mid-range NVIDIA GeForce 200 / AMD Radeon HD 5000. Integrated Intel HD Graphics should work but is not supported; problems are generally solved with a driver update.
    • Hard Drive: 5 GB available space
    Recommended:
    • OS: Windows 7
    • Processor: High-range Intel Core i5 / AMD FX CPU or equivalent.
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: High-range NVIDIA GeForce 400 / AMD Radeon HD 6000. Integrated Intel HD Graphics should work but is not supported; problems are generally solved with a driver update.
    • Hard Drive: 5 GB available space
    Minimum:
    • OS: OS X 10.6.8
    • Processor: High-range Intel Core i3 / AMD A6 CPU or equivalent.
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Mid-range NVIDIA GeForce 200 / AMD Radeon HD 5000. Integrated Intel HD Graphics should work but is not supported; problems are generally solved with a driver update.
    • Hard Drive: 5 GB available space
    Recommended:
    • OS: OS X 10.7.5
    • Processor: High-range Intel Core i5 / AMD FX CPU or equivalent.
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: High-range NVIDIA GeForce 400 / AMD Radeon HD 6000. Integrated Intel HD Graphics should work but is not supported; problems are generally solved with a driver update.
    • Hard Drive: 5 GB available space
    Minimum:
    • OS: Major Linux Distribution from 2010.
    • Processor: High-range Intel Core i3 / AMD A6 CPU or equivalent.
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Mid-range NVIDIA GeForce 200 / AMD Radeon HD 5000. Integrated Intel HD Graphics should work but is not supported; problems are generally solved with a driver update.
    • Hard Drive: 5 GB available space
    Recommended:
    • OS: Major Linux Distribution from 2012
    • Processor: High-range Intel Core i5 / AMD FX CPU or equivalent.
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: High-range NVIDIA GeForce 400 / AMD Radeon HD 6000. Integrated Intel HD Graphics should work but is not supported; problems are generally solved with a driver update.
    • Hard Drive: 5 GB available space
Helpful customer reviews
75 of 83 people (90%) found this review helpful
4.7 hrs on record
Posted: November 6
-
Click for Gameplay Trailer - Review
-
Graphics:
+ detailed scenes
+ nice but not realistic light atmosphere
- simple architecture
- blurred textures

Balance:
+ notebook
+ fair checkpoints
- ridiculous tasks/puzzles

Sound:
+ good surround effects
+ impressive voice acting
+ disturbing music and unsettling sound effects

Atmosphere:
+ tense situations
+ panic and helplessness
+ some shock moments

Game Size:
+ different rooms
+ brilliantly written script
- not replayable
- short playtime
- drags over the last hour or so with repetition and story padding

Part of the reason why Amnesia: The Dark Descent is scary is because it often leaves you feeling vulnerable and lost in a foreboding world.
Its twisted narrative, creepy visuals, and disturbing enemies intensify these feelings and turn it into an enjoyable and intriguing journey into darkness. The sequel of Amnesia: The Dark Descent takes horror-movie tropes and stirs them into a meditation on the meaning of life, love, war, religion, madness, and the impact of industrialism on 19th-century England.
Put all of this into an incredibly creepy adventure that takes place almost entirely in the pitch dark, toss in some pig-men, and you have one supremely unnerving adventure that is impossible to put down.
Machine for Pigs follows the hazy journey of a wealthy industrialist named Oswald Mandus, who wakes up suffering from amnesia wondering where his children are.
Following in the original’s footsteps, you uncover more about his memories and past actions listening in on conversations he remembers throughout the game and finding diary entries that help build a mysterious backstory.

The story here is by far the strongest aspect of the game, in so much as it stands above everything else like an Olympic weight lifter competing with a classroom of eight year old children without hands (the latter of which sounds like something The Chinese Room would work into one of their games if they could).
It is so well written and genuinely interesting that it kept pulling me along through the game, despite all the nervous flutterings in my stomach that were telling me to turn the game off and go play something more fitting to my bravery level.

Gone is your item inventory and resource management, replaced with a newfound emphasis on environment exploration. Your trusty lantern no longer requires a constant supply of oil, though having it lit will still attract the various beasts which roam the world.
And I’m saddened by the absence of the signature sanity meter, one of the original Amnesia's most memorable elements. A Machine for Pigs delivers a tighter and arguably more interesting horror experience than its predecessor. Honestly, stripping down A Machine for Pigs to its bare essentials makes it a much less physically taxing game. You won't be hiding in closets, flicking your light on and off to regain your sanity, or scouring the environment for extra oil and tinderboxes.
But while it demands less of you through its mechanics, in return it asks much more in terms of unraveling its macabre, savagely poignant story.

The gameplay itself isn't quite as fraught with tension as the plot that you follow, although it comes close. There are no logic puzzles, no inventories full of junk to accumulate, no combat, or anything else that would get between you and the story.
You mostly follow a linear path through the game's many levels, figuring out how to open locked doors, spin various dials and wheels, and so forth.
There isn't a single problem to be solved that requires more than a little bit of exploration and observation.

Through the use of enigmatic diaries, wonderfully creepy audio logs, and a great sense of environmental storytelling, A Machine for Pigs makes Mandus' narrative arc a fantastic trip that culminates in one of the most satisfying final acts of 2013. It marries a deeply tragic and personal story with a terrifying look back at the dark side of the rise of technology. I'm being vague for a reason, because much of Amnesia's power lies in a series of great story reveals. Sadly, you'll have to trudge through a lot of underwhelming puzzles to extract it.

Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs may be a different kind of horror than fans are expecting, but it's an interesting and welcome experiment in gaming terror. Between the obligatory puzzles is a game that delivers a painfully personal story and some superb psychological horror.

Score: 73 / 100


Sorry for my bad english. This is my review account, because the low playtime.
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Was this review helpful? Yes No
65 of 90 people (72%) found this review helpful
2.4 hrs on record
Posted: October 30
Oh man. This game is such a dissapointment.
If ''The Chinese Room'' didnt get involved this could've been so much better.
They didnt try to make Amnesia 2, they tried to make a sequel to Dear Esther.

I loved the story in TDD, it had the perfect balance between gameplay and story. This one is more focused on the story but I couldn't really get into it because it's so effin boring. There was not a single scary moment in this game and the 'monsters' you'll face later on are no threat to you and you can just casually walk past them. Your character is never in any actual danger. You couldn't check your sanity; tinderboxes and oil didn't exist. You don't have an inventory so don't even bother exploring. But why mention it? You can't do that anyway since every door in this game is locked unless you have to actually go through it. If you loved grabbing random ♥♥♥♥ in TDD and throwing it at the enemy or just against a wall - you can't do it in this one cause everything is locked in place.
The nerve wrecking atmosphere from TDD is completey lost, you don't have to worry about oil for your lantern cause it is unlimited.

I quit the game 3 times but I kept giving it a chance because I WANTED it to be good but there is really no hope for this. A Machine for Pigs is a complete let down to every The Dark Descent fan.
The fact that this game is 3-5 hours long is a joke.
So I will say this: This is one of the worst Horror Games I've ever played in my entire life.
It's not even worth a 1 out of 10 so I won't bother rating it.
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22 of 30 people (73%) found this review helpful
5.0 hrs on record
Posted: October 29
Play for the story and the creepy atmosphere. No horror game excels Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs in those regards.

Note to anyone who has played Amnesia: The Dark Descent:

Please do not take this game as a sequel to Amnesia: The Dark Descent. What many people do wrong with this game is that they go with the mindset of the previous Amnesia - going for the horror.

Now, I'm not saying it's wrong to play horror games for the horror in them, and it definitely is not a surprise why people think of this as a sequel, what with the blaring "Amnesia" in the name. However, while the game does make an occasional reference to the original, it's significantly better to think of this as a stand-alone game.

Amnesia: The Dark Descent was made by Frictional Games. They have made a name for themselves by bringing back the horror in the horror genre. Their games have that creeping atmosphere that you can never be rid of. From Penumbra: Black Plague onwards, they took a theme of defenselessness, which definitely has been a big asset.

Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs was made by The Chinese Room. When Frictional Games thought about making a sequel to the Amnesia series, they decided to have an other company make it instead. Being impressed by Dear Esther, they approached The Chinese Room for sharing similar mindsets in their game development. Frictional Games did not want The Chinese Room to make a game that is similar to the original, they wanted them to make a game in their own way.

Two different companies make a game of the same world, with the same theme. It's obvious there'll be differences.

From Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs, you'll get to experience a creepy, gross, horrifying story of a mad man trying to redeem himself.
From Amnesia: The Dark Descent, you'll get a full-blown horror blast in your face. Scrreeeaaaam.
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6 of 8 people (75%) found this review helpful
4.6 hrs on record
Posted: November 2
I like it.

I do not like many games. I am ridiculously picky, but this game was good enough to get me to write a review.

It has an excellent story (read the notes you find dammit), creepy atmosphere, and keeps a good pace. It is a short, but worthwhile game to play through.
Was this review helpful? Yes No
13 of 22 people (59%) found this review helpful
4.1 hrs on record
Posted: November 1
Certainly feels like I am playing another "The Chinese Room" game. To me, it feels like Dear Esther but with the "Amnesia" name slapped on it. You have very little to no interaction with your environment. No inventory. You spend the whole time just walking. Atleast in the first Amnesia you had puzzles to complete and had to manage your lantern. The times when you would come into contact with the monster were predictable. I never really felt scared to search an area because anytime I would see the monster it would come in the form of a mini jump scare for its reveal.

Here, it is nothing like that and the AI is horrid. There is one part where you need to go down a hallway and the exit is to the right. But to the left it branches off a to a small path with which the monster does laps of. You could sneak past. OR do what I did and just run past and as soon as you go through the door the monster doesnt follow because invisible walls they can't past. It was honestly the stupidoust thing I've ever seen. It was an encounter that was absolutely pointless. I made a little picture to show below. But anyone that played it long enough and got to this part would know how stupid it was.

Excuse the horrible picture I attempted to make.

###################################
#....................................................................EXIT
#.................... ==>
#......../\.....#######
#.......| |.....#..........#.........| |...........########
#.......| |.....#..........#.........| |..........#
#...............#######.........\/..........#
#...................................................#
#...........<== MONSTER.................#
#################.................#
..................................#.................#
..................................#.................#
..................................#.................#
..................................#...YOU......#
Was this review helpful? Yes No
3 of 3 people (100%) found this review helpful
4.2 hrs on record
Posted: November 24
I think Machine for Pigs is a failure. But it is such an interesting, artful failure that it's nearly a success. I'm not sure how much I'd recommend it to horror fans, but I think it's a must-play for anyone interested in developing horror games. First, because it tells one of the most intelligent stories in horror gaming, and second, because it provides so many great examples of how not to make a narrative-focused horror game. Some of which aren't immediately obvious. I personally didn't realize before how important environmental interaction in a narrative-focused game was until I played A Machine for Pigs and saw how detrimental static environments could be to immersion.

Read more here
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4 of 5 people (80%) found this review helpful
14.1 hrs on record
Posted: November 9
It's not exactly like The Dark Descent, for sure. But too many people evaluate A Machine for Pigs on the standard of how similar it is to its predecessor, too afraid to look at it on its own merits. Indeed, there are fewer gameplay elements, such as an infinite lamp duration, easier/fewer puzzles, and an overall lower danger level. But what AMFP has, it does spectacularly. The Chinese Room took a more story-heavy approach and crafted the world around how it's told, and it's a tale well worth hearing. The environments are beautifully constructed, the voicework fits the characters perfectly, and Jessica Curry's music is spectacular. It's like a roller coaster: just because you're not pushing the carts yourself doesn't mean it's not a enjoyable, thrilling ride.

People looking for a game that will leave them petrified with fear will be more at home with The Dark Descent. But if you enjoyed the story of The Dark Descent and want to lose yourself in a tale just as gripping and harrowing, definitely give A Machine for Pigs a shot!
Was this review helpful? Yes No
3 of 4 people (75%) found this review helpful
0.5 hrs on record
Posted: November 9
Not quite sure how I feel about this game. I mean, it's scary and all, but I don't think it's as scary as TDD. And I believe the problem lays in the fact that it was not developed by Frictional Games, but was made instead by the Chinese Room. A company that's only well known title is "Dear Esther" and very lack luster 'Adventure' game. http://youtu.be/Iekm59q6TYo
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3 of 4 people (75%) found this review helpful
2.6 hrs on record
Posted: November 20
List of things that were good in Amnesia The Dark Descent:
- you could light candles with limited supplies of matches
- you had a lantern that could go low on fuel
- you had to manage madness : stay stealthy in the dark and become mad, or get low on resources and be spotted by enemies by lighting stuff but remaining sane. It was smart and a balanced system
- enemies were threatening AND frightening, and hard to outrun

This is also the list of things that have been removed in A Machine For Pigs.
It is closer to Dear Esther than Amnesia. Don't buy if you're looking for a horror game.

Didn't finish it, I was just bored playing it. Not frightening, not involving, not entertaining. And I've seen too many valves.
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4 of 6 people (67%) found this review helpful
3.1 hrs on record
Posted: November 8
dissapointing to the point not worth playing. would rather play the dark descent a second time than use money on this.
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4 of 6 people (67%) found this review helpful
4.4 hrs on record
Posted: November 17
A really great story within a mediocre game. They removed most of what made the first Amnesia enjoyable. The manpigs are a joke of an "enemy", if you could call it that. They're mostly there just to scream and damage your ears. Aside from that, it has a bunch of technical bugs, like draw distance problems and low framerate sectors.

It is also really, really short. I completed it around 4 hours, but I explored just about every corner, expecting to find something interesting but you'll only end up with an extra note or two. You could probably finish it in 2 hours or less.
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5 of 8 people (63%) found this review helpful
3.3 hrs on record
Posted: November 13
About as scary as a five foot and senile man, in his late seventies, attempting to rob you with a blunt fork, in broad daylight.
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1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
4.2 hrs on record
Posted: November 19
I went into this game assuming it had nothing to do with The Dark Descent, and was basically a spiritual successor. However, it played pretty similarly to The Dark Descent, and even had a somewhat related story.

It's about half as long, but just as good in my opinion. There is no puzzle-solving to speak of, and you likely won't have a problem with the enemies. The draw of this game is the sense of unease, and concise storytelling--I think I had more consistent fun playing A Machine for Pigs.

If you like horror or The Dark Descent, I recommend sticking this on your wishlist and maybe waiting for a sale. It's not as perfect as The Dark Descent, but it's still great.

8/10, forever stuck in The Dark Descent's shadow
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2 of 3 people (67%) found this review helpful
4.2 hrs on record
Posted: November 13
Don't be fooled by the name. This game is nothing like Amnesia: TDD. The puzzle-solving sucks (way too easy) and the gameplay is incredibly linear and short (4 hours playthrough). A few good jump scares and audio cues are not enough to justify buying this game.
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2 of 3 people (67%) found this review helpful
4.8 hrs on record
Posted: November 23
I haven't seen this many door locks since Silent Hill.

Also, get your Dear Esther out of my Amnesia!

"NO, YOU GET YOUR CHOCOLATE OUT OF MY PEANUT BUTTER!"

Er.

It looks like they dulled it down for the console folk- or something, because the inventory screen is non-existent, besides the journal screen.

Well at least it's technically more realistic when it comes to hauling stuff around, and not, you know..

Stuffing 5 televisions down your trousers or something equally ridiculous like in Silent Hill: Origins.

But you know, VIDEO GAME INVENTORYS! (Still better than Sir Inventoryless British Regenerating Health Mcgee here)

So you have unlimited flashlight, you never lose sanity, bla bla bla. Where the hell is my incentive of being terrified or intimidated, besides the ear ♥♥♥♥ jump scares Which *barely* work.

At one point, the physics went absolutely ape♥♥♥♥ when I loaded a game, and that legitimately was the scariest part of the game for me, I even made a video of that happening.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1WWhNf2heNU


You can't go backwards to previous levels whatsoever.

Stealth is, more or less, nonexistent, and KIND OF used in like 2 parts. The games like, "Don't have your light pointed at MONSTARS!" and I'm like "Okay, crate room thing, here's a MONSTAR!, my lights been off a while and I'm clearly crouching and stealthing through here slow and smooth..."

(5 seconds later)

"♥♥♥♥ THAT ♥♥♥♥, IT DOESN'T WORK! RUN BRITISH REGENERATING HEALTH MAN, RUN!"


I'm not saying this is a terrible game, it's just an inferior sequel. Chances are, if you liked the first game, you probably won't like the second very much.

This is definitely more focused on story and ear shattering jumpscares, and it's all like "WHAT THE ♥♥♥♥ IS A SURVIVAL HORROR?!" whilst snorting cocaine.

I give this 6 out of 10 cocaine snorting pigs. Would physics glitch heartattack again.
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3 of 5 people (60%) found this review helpful
3.2 hrs on record
Posted: November 8
Rather than trying to repeat the success of "Amnesia," Frictional hired The Chinese Room to make “A Machine for Pigs;" a weird, little, "Halloween 3" style game that tells a complete story all its own, yet has nothing to do with the original. To their credit, this was probably smart. "Amnesia" was a brilliant game, but its scares were already wearing thin toward the end, so serving up a sequel that is nothing but more of the same wouldn't have gone over well.

Unfortunately, "A Machine for Pigs" isn't even a fraction of the game that "Amnesia" was. It doesn’t really bother trying to be a horror game, for starters. The monsters are always well lit and kind of silly looking (I kept thinking of the pig sidekick from "Beyond Good and Evil" every time I saw them), and what's more, are barely in the game at all. The lack of horror would be fine if it succeeded in some other area, but unfortunately it doesn't. There are some puzzles, but it's not really an adventure game either. "Amnesia" had very few puzzles, but made great use of its physics engine in the puzzles that it did have. In contrast, the majority of AMfP's puzzles are of the "find 3 different switches to progress" variety, with next to no use of the game’s excellent physics engine.

Given the limited scares, gameplay, and interactivity, AMfP ultimately plays more like a sequel to the Chinese Room's earlier game, "Dear Esther," rather than "Amnesia." The ending deals with some interesting ideas about the horrors of the 20th century, but much like "Dear Esther," the developers never find a compelling means of expressing those ideas via gameplay. So you are left with an odd tech demo type experience that is part adventure game, part horror game, and part interactive movie, but that never commits fully enough to any of these elements to do them properly. The result, much like “Dear Esther,” reaches far, but ultimately collapses under the weight of its own pretensions, ending up playing a bit like an amateurish “Amnesia” mod awkwardly mashed up with a freshman creative writing project.

A huge disappointment.
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4 of 7 people (57%) found this review helpful
9.5 hrs on record
Posted: October 30
The game feels like a fan contribution to the original Amnesia - similar theme but with none of the style. Jump-scares are substituted in place of tension and carefully layered atmosphere, The world feels less interactive and explorable, and the whole expereince feels like the subtlety has been stripped out, when compared to the original.



Machine for Pigs almost exclusively tries to startle you rather than firghten you. The problem with this is that being startled is a physical reaction, being frightened is an emotional one: and I think most would agree a more satisfying one in a horror game.



The only situation I think someone would prefer this game to the first one is if they are unfamiliar with computer games in general and find it distracting to have to manage lantern oil, inventory, sanity etc. All of these have been removed form the game.



I picked this up from Humble Bundle and so I hardly spent anything to buy it, I would not recommend this if you are paying full price.
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4 of 7 people (57%) found this review helpful
1.7 hrs on record
Posted: November 8
Its basically a scary walking simulator with some puzzles. I'm not kidding, I just told you all of the gameplay mechanics.

Yes, you can hide but you can't die nor die of sanity.
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4 of 7 people (57%) found this review helpful
4.0 hrs on record
Posted: November 10
I believe Bioshock Infinite made more sense than this. Now excuse me while I go get something to eat, I'm craving bacon for some reason.
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6 of 12 people (50%) found this review helpful
4.9 hrs on record
Posted: November 2
Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs maintains the core mechanics and gameplay from Amnesia: The Dark Descent so prepare to experience an intense and scary game. The game starts off very strong, but then does fall off in terms of horror mid-way through the game. The game is also shorter than the original and a lot of the "danger" elements have been removed so you are not constantly dying but experiencing the story. Recommended if you enjoyed The Dark Descent and want another pass for a horror game.
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