From the creators of Amnesia: The Dark Descent and Dear Esther comes a new first-person horrorgame that will drag you to the depths of greed, power and madness. It will bury its snout into your ribs and it will eat your heart.
User reviews:
Overall:
Mixed (3,937 reviews) - 64% of the 3,937 user reviews for this game are positive.
Release Date: Sep 10, 2013

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Buy Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs

Packages that include this game

Buy Amnesia Collection

Includes 2 items: Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs, Amnesia: The Dark Descent

 

About This Game

This world is a Machine. A Machine for Pigs. Fit only for the slaughtering of Pigs.

From the creators of Amnesia: The Dark Descent and Dear Esther comes a new first-person horrorgame that will drag you to the depths of greed, power and madness. It will bury its snout into your ribs and it will eat your heart.

The year is 1899

Wealthy industrialist Oswald Mandus awakes in his bed, wracked with fever and haunted by dreams of a dark and hellish engine. Tortured by visions of a disastrous expedition to Mexico, broken on the failing dreams of an industrial utopia, wracked with guilt and tropical disease, he wakes into a nightmare. The house is silent, the ground beneath him shaking at the will of some infernal machine: all he knows is that his children are in grave peril, and it is up to him to save them.

Unique Selling Points

  • Fresh and new approach to the Amnesia world while staying true to its origins.
  • The darkest, most horrific tale ever told in a videogame.
  • Stunning soundtrack by award-winning composer Jessica Curry.

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
SteamOS + Linux
    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows Vista
    • Processor: High-range Intel Core i3 / AMD A6 CPU or equivalent.
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Mid-range NVIDIA GeForce 200 / AMD Radeon HD 5000. Integrated Intel HD Graphics should work but is not supported; problems are generally solved with a driver update.
    • Storage: 5 GB available space
    Recommended:
    • OS: Windows 7
    • Processor: High-range Intel Core i5 / AMD FX CPU or equivalent.
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: High-range NVIDIA GeForce 400 / AMD Radeon HD 6000. Integrated Intel HD Graphics should work but is not supported; problems are generally solved with a driver update.
    • Storage: 5 GB available space
    Minimum:
    • OS: OS X 10.6.8
    • Processor: High-range Intel Core i3 / AMD A6 CPU or equivalent.
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Mid-range NVIDIA GeForce 200 / AMD Radeon HD 5000. Integrated Intel HD Graphics should work but is not supported; problems are generally solved with a driver update.
    • Storage: 5 GB available space
    Recommended:
    • OS: OS X 10.7.5
    • Processor: High-range Intel Core i5 / AMD FX CPU or equivalent.
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: High-range NVIDIA GeForce 400 / AMD Radeon HD 6000. Integrated Intel HD Graphics should work but is not supported; problems are generally solved with a driver update.
    • Storage: 5 GB available space
    Minimum:
    • OS: Major Linux Distribution from 2010.
    • Processor: High-range Intel Core i3 / AMD A6 CPU or equivalent.
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Mid-range NVIDIA GeForce 200 / AMD Radeon HD 5000. Integrated Intel HD Graphics should work but is not supported; problems are generally solved with a driver update.
    • Storage: 5 GB available space
    Recommended:
    • OS: Major Linux Distribution from 2012
    • Processor: High-range Intel Core i5 / AMD FX CPU or equivalent.
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: High-range NVIDIA GeForce 400 / AMD Radeon HD 6000. Integrated Intel HD Graphics should work but is not supported; problems are generally solved with a driver update.
    • Storage: 5 GB available space
Helpful customer reviews
66 of 97 people (68%) found this review helpful
6 people found this review funny
5.7 hrs on record
Posted: November 1, 2015
A majority of the negative reviews are just people upset that the game isn't exactly the same as the first.

Don't expect something similar to the first, but do expect a game less focused on the gameplay and more on the story.

At first, I to was skeptical of this game due to it being made by thechineseroom, a group who made Dear Esther, a game I detest. However, the story in this game is actually a story and not just vague mutterings with barely any coherency, so this is actually worth playing.
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21 of 25 people (84%) found this review helpful
11.3 hrs on record
Posted: January 19
I don't understand all the hate directed at this game. People have bought this game in hopes that it would be as scary as its predecessor. Sure it's not as scary as Amnesia: The Dark Descend, but still, Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs is a brilliant game. First of all, it is story-rich and has an awesome plot, although the story might be a little difficult to understand if English isn't your first language.

Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs is a very enjoyable game that is both scary & story-rich. Sure, it's got its flaws like every other game such as being very boring in the beginning (Doing almost nothing for the first 1.5 hours) but Frictional Games, teamed up with the Chinese room have created a good game. However, the absence of the sanity mechanics somewhat makes this game "incomplete".

If you like really good stories, mixed in with some horror, then this game is for you.

I'd give it a solid 7.5/10

PS: "SPOILER" I wish we had the choice at the end of the game, of either destroying the machine, or let it do its job and "save" humanity.
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24 of 32 people (75%) found this review helpful
41 people found this review funny
9.6 hrs on record
Posted: November 10, 2015
Yall think pigs aren't scary but you aint try playing while being a muslim yet
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13 of 16 people (81%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
8.8 hrs on record
Posted: December 26, 2015
Honestly, I think people are too hard on this game.

Is it as scary as Amnesia: Dark Descent? Not necessarily, but then Dark Descent was such an unexpectedly delirious and exhilerating experience. It was a surprise. The difference with its sequel is that people have been expecting A Machine For Pigs for a while; based on those expectations, some were disappointed.

I was not. A Machine For Pigs doesn't need to be as scary as Dark Descent. Of course there are plenty of moments in that game which made my blood run cold, such as the infamous chase through the flooded Archives with a monster snapping at your heels, the damned Prison area which gave me plenty of mini heartattacks, and just the growl of those disgusting monsters. Yet I remember only a few moments from that game, which to me are not as important as the overall experience. What was the most scary for me was actually the story, and learning about Daniel. At the beginning, he's a man that drank the Amnesia potion to make himself forget the horrors the Baron had inflicted. But of course, as we descend deeper into Brennenberg, we realize the truth. Near the end, I wasn't even sure Daniel deserved to be saved (which is why the three different endings pleased me so much).

A Machine For Pigs has a story that is just as good, and in some respects, better than Dark Descent. It has its moments too, but A Machine For Pigs is all about how it leaves you feeling than the individual moments you can remember. The core element of discovering the story through notes, and the journal entries of Oswald, is still there. We learn he's a drunkard (wine is, after all, its own form of Amnesia). We learn he's a butcher. We learn he wants to be more effective at butchering through the use of technology. We learn his wife died in childbirth, which clearly has a bad affect on his sanity (like a true madman, he wants mmotality, and creates a machine to that effect). He apparently wants to save his children, and is guided by a vaguely familiar and sinister voice over the scattered telephones. His journal entries are distrubing enough, littered with contempt, hatred, anger, dispair, and revolting descriptions, all which offer a glimpse into his deranged mind.

You really need to appreciate the briliance of this, along with the other core elements that made Dark Descent amazing, which A Machine For Pigs definitely has: the sound, the constant oppressive and immersive atmosphere, the music, the voice acting, and the mystery. Despite the tension which keeps you constantly on edge, you want to keep exploring the machine. You feel compelled to descend further down, past the scraping metal, the wails of steam, the screams and groans of the machinery, the flickering lights, the thick, putrid smell as its often described, the pulsing of the engines-A Machine For Pigs does a fantastic job of creating the setting. The fact that I felt no relief when I was briefly outside is also a testament to that accomplishment. The rain slicked and gloomy London streets offered no breath of fresh air.

A Machine For Pigs is memorable for its hauntingly beautiful settings. Now, one of my complaints is that there is not really a sense of urgency. That's practically a requirement given the premise, but unlike the constant fear of having the Shadow chase you in Dark Descent, A Machine For Pigs takes its time delivering on the scares. To be sure, there are scares to be had, and there are a few jumpscares right from the very beginning. The urgency comes in bursts, mostly from being chased by the grotesque pig-men. The puzzles are mostly unnecessary (like the Sanity meter in Dark Descent, which did little more than blur the screen) and mostly frustrating.

Interestingly, while I was playing, I couldn't stop thinking of Pink Floyd's video for Another Brick In The Wall. That's totally a good thing! I also couldn't shake the eeriness, the dread. The disgust, eventually, because just as I felt ultimately repulsed by Daniel, Oswald proved to surpass even Daniel's selfishness and brutality. That's why A Machine For Pigs is so good, in my opinion: the sum of its parts is an experience worth your time and careful attention.

The blood splattered walls of the factory where the pigs are slaughtered take on an even more vile nature when you read Oswald's diary because his descriptions of people, often as "swine," sends chills down your spine. Pigs are closest to humans, biologically speaking. And Oswald's pursuit of fortune, and of leaving a legacy which survives flesh and bone is accomplished without scruples and through ruthlessness which makes Daniel seem like a saint. His creation is the machine, and the setting of Industrial Revolution era London, with all of its distinct British cruelty, child labour, capitalism, and new technology is simply perfect to tell a story that is fundamentally about greed. And the bloody path we carve to sate it.

And there are scares. Some require a bit more thinking and putting the pieces together, some require running away and hiding, some can make you yell and flinch away from the screen. It's good we don't have to gather oil for the lantern (it runs on electricity now, anyway) or that we need to gather an inventory because I think in this context, it would become tedious. Instead, we can focus on the atmosphere, story, and the scares. We can get lost in the growls and squeals, the heavy, incessant labours of the machine, and simply unravel the insanity within.

So is A Machine For Pigs scary, all in all? That depends on your definition of scary; it will scare you when and where it's supposed to, in a heart pounding, sweaty hands sort of way. Think of it as a rush, a wave of fear that crashes into you, whereas Dark Descent was a constant flood.

Yet instead of comparison, we should enjoy A Machine For Pigs rather as its own unique, interesting, and dark vision of human nature. So I think the real question should be: is A Machine For Pigs horrifying? And the answer is absolutely. That is the point, after all.


Truly, I am not a fan of horror. I was intrigued by Dark Descent because my friends wouldn't shut up about it, with good reason. Dark Descent became the game which urged me to consider some other ones, and Dark Descent quickly became my favourite horror game, with Outlast being a very close second. I've found that the genre is deeply rooted in all the sorts of sad, brutal, sick and twisted ways humans strip away their humanity (usually by trying to become more than what we are; most of the time, the sacrifices aren't worth it). This game is no exception.

A Machine For Pigs is certainly deserving of sharing the same panicked breath with Dark Descent.
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21 of 35 people (60%) found this review helpful
4 people found this review funny
2.4 hrs on record
Posted: January 5
Finished it in 2 hours. Good game, but 20$ for 2 hours of gameplay? Kinda steep.
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