A hack and slash action adventure, set in a fantasy pixel art environment. Play solo or co-op in this adventure from bottom to top of Castle Hammerwatch. Kill hordes of enemies with varied looks and features through four unique environments with traps, hidden secrets and puzzles.
User reviews:
Overall:
Very Positive (4,601 reviews) - 90% of the 4,601 user reviews for this game are positive.
Release Date: Aug 12, 2013

Sign in to add this item to your wishlist, follow it, or mark it as not interested

Buy Hammerwatch

Buy Hammerwatch 4-Pack

 

Recent updates View all (6)

April 1

Patch Notes for 1.32 (April 2016)

This is just a minor release with some bug fixes.

  • Starting game should no longer take a very long time when you're subscribed to many workshop items
  • Fixed multiple musics playing at the same time in custom games
  • Several crash fixes

14 comments Read more

Steam Greenlight

About This Game

A hack and slash action adventure, set in a fantasy pixel art environment. Play solo or co-op in this adventure from bottom to top of Castle Hammerwatch. Kill hordes of enemies with varied looks and features through four unique environments with traps, hidden secrets and puzzles.

Key Features

  • 6 different classes, with unique features and skills
  • Character development through unlocks and upgrades
  • Hard, medium and easy of course
  • Customize difficulty with several different modifiers
  • Controller support, supports various different gamepads
  • Multiplayer COOP, for up to four players, online, LAN and local
  • PC, MAC and Linux support
  • Mod and editing support, make your own levels and change other things to your liking

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
SteamOS + Linux
    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows XP / Vista / 7 / 8
    • Processor: 1.8 GHz
    • Memory: 1 GB RAM
    • Graphics: OpenGL 1.4 Compatible
    • Storage: 300 MB available space
    Recommended:
    • OS: Windows XP / Vista / 7 / 8
    • Processor: Any dual core
    • Memory: 1 GB RAM
    • Graphics: OpenGL 2.0 Compatible
    • Storage: 300 MB available space
    Minimum:
    • OS: 10.8
    • Processor: 1.8 GHz
    • Memory: 1 GB RAM
    • Graphics: OpenGL 1.4 Compatible
    • Storage: 300 MB available space
    Recommended:
    • OS: 10.8
    • Processor: Any dual core
    • Memory: 1 GB RAM
    • Graphics: OpenGL 2.0 Compatible
    • Storage: 300 MB available space
    Minimum:
    • Processor: 1.8 GHz
    • Memory: 1 GB RAM
    • Graphics: OpenGL 1.4 Compatible
    • Storage: 300 MB available space
    Recommended:
    • Processor: Any dual core
    • Memory: 1 GB RAM
    • Graphics: OpenGL 2.0 Compatible
    • Storage: 300 MB available space
Helpful customer reviews
58 of 64 people (91%) found this review helpful
3 people found this review funny
12.7 hrs on record
Posted: November 10, 2015
The story of Hammerwatch truly is a modern masterpiece in storytelling. As the campaign begins, the line "The small bridge broke behind you...there is probably no way out!" is displayed. And that's it. That's the plot. Hammerwatch isn't the type of game that really needs a plot, however. The fact that the bridge broke and there is probably no way out is actually a decent introduction to the game as a whole: a light-hearted, if not a bit shallow, romp. In addition to the campaign, there is also a wave-based defense mode and the inclusion of a level editor for creating custom levels.

oing its best to harken back to classic Gauntlet, Hammerwatch is a cooperative hack-and-slash action game. There are four classes to choose from: Paladin, Warlock, Ranger, and Wizard. Each class starts with a regular attack as well as a special attack that drains a certain amount of magic points. More special attacks are eventually unlocked, though it takes a bit too long to actually earn them. In my experience, nothing comes close to the effectiveness of a Ranger since their default attack pierces through enemies - continuing its trajectory to harm even more enemies - and their bomb special attack is perfect for kiting and killing large groups of enemies at a time.

t's also possible to strafe while moving, which is perhaps the most important thing to take away from this review if you buy Hammerwatch, as it’s not immediately apparent within the game. Mastering the strafe-and-attack is crucial for any class' survivability, since moving diagonally while attacking is so freaking useful.

There are a handful of secrets, puzzles, and obstacles that don't necessarily require fighting at all. Hidden rooms permeate each floor, and if the player keeps an eye out they should be able to find just about all of them. Puzzles are never too difficult, and in fact sometimes they are insultingly easy. These variants do a good job of breaking up the monotonous wave-clearing gameplay that makes up most of Hammerwatch.

Playing alone feels hollow, since a large part of the difficulty comes in the form of more and more of the same types of enemies being thrown at the player - a challenge that's far easier to enjoy when in the company of friends. Single-player reveals the game's shallow mechanics; movement and two attacks don't really make for the most compelling gameplay.

Progression comes from a variety of vendors throughout the levels. Early on it is a very linear progression since only certain vendors are available. The first upgrade is the ability to combo, which allows players who kill at least 10 enemies in a row very quickly to gain a temporary boost to their stats. Later upgrades will build off of this, making it easier to combo and giving better benefits for comboing. By the end of the second act, players will finally have access to more special moves as well as having a little more open-endedness to their character's build.

The problem is that the end of the second act is a decent chunk of game away -- especially for players going it alone. While the level design is very open-ended and non-linear, the character progression is the exact opposite and takes way too long to become interesting. It can feel like forever when slogging through the seemingly endless waves of enemies with the basic attacks, waiting for something cool or interesting to happen.

This is where the bosses come in. After a pretty easy time mowing down countless enemies, the first boss steps in and SMASHES YOUR FACE INTO THE GROUND. Seriously, the difficulty shift from regular enemies to boss fights is gigantic! The bosses are quite challenging, but don't cross the line into becoming unfair (though this can easily depend on the player's class). The bosses utilize genuinely interesting mechanics for the most part and are a real blast to play through cooperatively.

Besides adjusting the difficulty, there are a variety of modifications that players can include to make the game way harder or way easier, or both! Things like limiting all players to 1 HP per life, removing mana regeneration, and allowing no extra lives can make the game super difficult if that's what you're into. On the other hand, you can add infinite lives, HP regeneration, and double damage if you just want to breeze through the entire game and not worry about a thing. The amount of options, gameplay or otherwise, is really delightful and a beautiful sight to behold.

Playing cooperatively can be done locally or online, the latter of which doesn't require sharing the same screen. Playing online does tend to stutter a bit, but never so much that it affects the gameplay in any meaningful way. The worst thing that seemed to happen was that it would look like my buddy got hit by those spikes, but on his end he was just fine. Just be warned ahead of time: you may need to open router ports if you want to host a game.

The default controls for the keyboard are okay, but if you've got a controller you're going to want to use it. The keyboard uses WASD for movement and the arrow keys for attacks. However, the arrow keys don't attack in their respective direction; they just each perform a different attack in whichever direction the character is facing. So, the up arrow will always use the basic attack in front of the character. It can get confusing since naturally players will think that the up arrow attacks upwards, but I suspect that most people will get used to it easily enough. Plus, the controls can be remapped, so everyone can find something that works for them.

The game does look very nice, as the pixel art is some of the best I've seen. It's basic enough to allow me to reminisce about the old NES days while providing enough detail and animation to really look fluid and alive. The enemy design is generally nothing special, but I love that it is immediately apparent when a stronger version of a previous enemy arrives just by looking at it. The audio is likewise great, but there is no fading in and out of music tracks; one will end abruptly and another will begin, causing a very rough and noticeable transition.

The deciding factor for Hammerwatch depends on if you’re planning on playing it cooperatively. If you've got a buddy or two who would play through the game with you and you enjoy some mindless hacking and/or slashing, then it will not disappoint.

As a solo venture, the game can feel boring and tedious as it starts off way too slowly, despite throwing in some interesting boss fights later on. My recommendation is that you play it with friends, chat over some third-party voice program, and forget about your worries as you mindlessly slay hundreds upon hundreds of worms and skeletons and bugs and bats.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
30 of 31 people (97%) found this review helpful
96.1 hrs on record
Posted: March 9
Excellent game! Has that old school rpg look while incorporating smooth and responsive modern day controls. I'm sure this is a good game to play solo. Though I'd highly recommend playing it with a friend. As any shared experience is always the more fun one. And with this game dropped down to £1.74 on winter/summer sales. There really is no reason not to treat a friend to this game (Though you're really treating yourself to a more enjoyable experience).

Hammerwatch currently has six classes with ranged and/or close quarters attacks. With each having a magic spell or ability and other ones unlocking later in the game. Multiple upgrades including health, mana, armour, damage, and many more. Seven dungeons which include multiple layers and have seven challenging bosses to go with each. This game has all of the tell-tale qualities of classic dungeon crawler with a few secrets & Easter eggs thrown in there to.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
11 of 12 people (92%) found this review helpful
15.8 hrs on record
Posted: January 29
A straight-up homage to Gauntlet that scratches that co-op, top down, dungeon crawling, loot collecting itch.

A couple of observations:

1. This game is way better as online co-op than living room co-op. With multiplayer on the same screen, you're always forced to stick together, but online you can split up and join back together through the multitude of passages.

2. All loot collected is shared! Hooray! I don't have to hate my partners, a la Four Swords, for stealing all my treasure.

3. This game brings back the "bad end" from the days of Ghosts n' Goblins and Bubble Bobble, and is too repetitive to crawl through twice. It should be more upfront on the importance of a certain item.

3. Re-map the autofire trigger to your main attack button, so it is both attack and autofire simultaneously. Your cramped hands will thank you.

Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
9 of 10 people (90%) found this review helpful
62.9 hrs on record
Posted: February 22
While exploring a castle dungeon, the collapse of a bridge have left you (and a few friends) stranded on your own. With the main party lost without your presence they decide to wait for you to find your way back to them. So off you embark on a journey of fortune and glory as you travel deeper into the dungeons of Castle Hammerwatch.

Set in a beautiful pixel-art world, Hammerwatch provides a challenging hack and slash adventure offering a fun solo and local co-op experience with a nice selection of classes to choose from, each with different abilties and playstyles. With plenty of hidden secrets and Easter Eggs, there is plenty to explore. With an extended campaign to the Sun Temple as well as user-created campaigns with the workshop, Hammerwatch offers a fun, but challenging experience.

Pros:
+ Beautiful pixel artwork
+ 2 campaigns as well as workshop support
+ Several classes to choose, each with their own abilities
+ Character progression
+ Hidden secrets and Easter Eggs
+ Controller support for a great couch co-op experience
+ Different difficulty modes (as well as extra challenge/help settings)
+ An auto-attack toggle in the settings (I found out about this way too late)

Cons:
- The main campaign's level layout is always the same (can be considered good and bad)
- The Sunwatch Temple campaign has pretty unfair bosses that may cause some frustration (while soloing at least)
- Online co-op community is quite inactive
- The Millionaire and Genocide achievements can be quite grindy

My Score: 7.5/10
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
10 of 15 people (67%) found this review helpful
2 people found this review funny
3.0 hrs on record
Posted: November 7, 2015
Gauntlet II on the NES.

Yes, it's back.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny