Congratulations. The October labor lottery is complete. Your name was pulled. For immediate placement, report to the Ministry of Admission at Grestin Border Checkpoint. An apartment will be provided for you and your family in East Grestin. Expect a Class-8 dwelling.
User reviews:
Recent:
Very Positive (450 reviews) - 93% of the 450 user reviews in the last 30 days are positive.
Overall:
Overwhelmingly Positive (15,789 reviews) - 96% of the 15,789 user reviews for this game are positive.
Release Date: Aug 8, 2013

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Buy Papers, Please

 

Reviews

“Buy, study, and share this game as an example of video games as true art.”
BUY – Ars Technica

“..it is absorbing, brilliantly written and causes you to question your every instinct and reaction - both in the game and in real life.”
9/10 – Eurogamer

“Papers Please is a fantastic idea, beautifully executed.”
8.7/10 – IGN

About This Game

Congratulations.
The October labor lottery is complete. Your name was pulled.
For immediate placement, report to the Ministry of Admission at Grestin Border Checkpoint.
An apartment will be provided for you and your family in East Grestin. Expect a Class-8 dwelling.
Glory to Arstotzka



The communist state of Arstotzka has just ended a 6-year war with neighboring Kolechia and reclaimed its rightful half of the border town, Grestin.

Your job as immigration inspector is to control the flow of people entering the Arstotzkan side of Grestin from Kolechia. Among the throngs of immigrants and visitors looking for work are hidden smugglers, spies, and terrorists.

Using only the documents provided by travelers and the Ministry of Admission's primitive inspect, search, and fingerprint systems you must decide who can enter Arstotzka and who will be turned away or arrested.

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
SteamOS + Linux
    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows XP or later
    • Processor: 1.5 GHz Core2Duo
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: OpenGL 1.4 or better
    • Storage: 100 MB available space
    • Additional Notes: Minimum 1280x720 screen resolution
    Minimum:
    • OS: OSX Mountain Lion (10.8)
    • Processor: 1.5 GHz Core2Duo
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: OpenGL 1.4 or better
    • Storage: 100 MB available space
    • Additional Notes: Minimum 1280x720 screen resolution
    Minimum:
    • Processor: 1.5 GHz Core2Duo
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Storage: 100 MB available space
    • Additional Notes: Minimum 1280x720 screen resolution
Customer reviews
Customer Review system updated! Learn more
Recent:
Very Positive (450 reviews)
Overall:
Overwhelmingly Positive (15,789 reviews)
Recently Posted
sunburnedslayer
( 18.2 hrs on record )
Posted: July 27
Glory to Arstotzka

pleasing campaign, very fine polish
hectic and rewarding time management
good memory helps
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Moonlight
( 7.0 hrs on record )
Posted: July 27
10/10, Would play Russian border simulator.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
MLG LITTEN
( 6.1 hrs on record )
Posted: July 27
GLORY TO ARSTOTZKA
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Dinosaur Sensei
( 13.5 hrs on record )
Posted: July 26
Greatest game ever made. You'll love the part with the papers, it will leave you in tears.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
chazajacobs
( 1.2 hrs on record )
Posted: July 26
great game highly recomend
Helpful? Yes No Funny
TheImperialDeticator
( 11.3 hrs on record )
Posted: July 26
Papers Please is a fantastic game that should be the top game on steam. I love how you can do down 20 different branches of endings and that you need to figure out things in a certain amount of time.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
mastermerrick
( 14.9 hrs on record )
Posted: July 26
I'll be honest, I thought this game would be boring due to it's premise: You are a border control officer in the fictional country of Arstotska, and have to approve or deny entrants to the country. The game sounds kinda dull, but with new mechanics every other in-game day or so, as well as the general storyline within the NPC interactions led Papers, Please to be a fun, engaging game. The only issue I have with it is it's short length. I was able to complete the game within 4 hours. However, being that this is a small game to begin with, and the inclusion of different challenge modes keep interest even after the campaign is long finished.

All in all, a good buy, and a quirky little game you could jump in and out of as you wish.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
keith
( 2.7 hrs on record )
Posted: July 26
I think Papers Please is worth the $10 its priced at.

Its an awesome puzzle/stratagey game set in a Communist country similar to the U.S.S.R.

My freinds thought the whole concept of stamping papers is stupid and I did too until I tried this game. It sucessfully shows people trying to survive in a country that pays next to nothing. At one point in the game this man's wife dosen't have an acceptable entry visa and you are forced to make the choice of letting her in or not. THis seems like a simple problem until you take in the fact that if you dont let her in the country, she will be shot.

Overall, Papers Please is worth the money.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Leon Trotsky ☦
( 0.6 hrs on record )
Posted: July 26
Papers, please.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Most Helpful Reviews  In the past 30 days
156 of 182 people (86%) found this review helpful
82 people found this review funny
63 of 73 people (86%) found this review helpful
63 people found this review funny
Recommended
317.4 hrs on record
Posted: June 27
Haven't played that long, good game though
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
42 of 46 people (91%) found this review helpful
28 people found this review funny
Recommended
9.2 hrs on record
Posted: July 4
Got screwed by twice in a row with a fake papers.
Third comrade comes in and prays that I let him pass for he has cancer and needs Arstozka's famous healthcare to fix him.
After preventing him to pass he offers me all his savings as a bribe.
I snatched his last pennies, denied his passport and commanded him to get back in the ♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥ he came from.

Felt both good and miserable at the same time afterwards... gg 10/10.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
96 of 136 people (71%) found this review helpful
89 people found this review funny
Recommended
13.7 hrs on record
Posted: June 28
I came here for trump jokes.
I got a post brexit UK sim.

10/10 still politicaly relevant
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
22 of 24 people (92%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
Recommended
4.2 hrs on record
Posted: July 13
It's amazing how much this game is deeper than it seems at first glance.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
17 of 22 people (77%) found this review helpful
20 people found this review funny
Recommended
30.6 hrs on record
Posted: July 15
☑ Nudity

Glory to Arstotzka
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
8 of 8 people (100%) found this review helpful
6 people found this review funny
Recommended
2.2 hrs on record
Posted: June 29
All of my family members died of disease.

I went to jail.

Glory to Arstotzka.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
9 of 11 people (82%) found this review helpful
9 people found this review funny
Recommended
1.3 hrs on record
Posted: July 15
DAN

DUN

DAN

DUN

DAN

DUN

DAN

DUN

DAN

DUN

DAN

DUN

Glory to Arztotska!
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
3 of 3 people (100%) found this review helpful
3 people found this review funny
3 of 3 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
5.8 hrs on record
Posted: June 30
Many people like to argue about how "fun" a game is, whenever they rate it. It is, in my opinion, a foolish concept of game criticism, as the "level of fun" a game has is purely determined by subjectivity.

However, I can definitely say that most people out there wouldn't find Papers, Please fun. And my response to that is... that isn't the point.

I know not everyone on Steam is an adult, but if you grew up with video games, I'd certainly hope your tastes have matured. I have some conversations with 30-year-old men who still can't stop gushing about how great Super Mario Bros. is, even thought it's simply just a fun game, and nothing more. It has nothing to say about humanity, it has no high artistic value, but it is still a fun game.

But fun isn't what makes a game. I love Spec Ops: The Line, and that game made me feel like I had swallowed gravel.

Papers, Please hasn't made me feel like I've swallowed any gravel, but it has made me walk away with a new perspective on the world around me and about how video games, as a whole, can be narrated.

On the surface, Papers, Please is a relatively simple game in concept: you work for a border, check travelers' passes, and either let them enter Arstotzka, or deny then entry depending on their documentation. But it's how the game continues to expand on this gameplay and on its simple story, that things start to get more... interesting, as the game goes on.

The game, as many critics have complained, is indeed monotonous at times. I know checing the details of someone's passport to see if it matches their access pass doesn't appeal to many people, but if you ever wanted to simulate the life of a border inspector, this is a regular thing they have to do. And it helps settle in that feeling of living in a lifeless country, where the only excitement you get it from the occaisional denial of entry.

I get the same satisfaction from playing Papers, Please that I get from my day job: a box office cashier. Sure, my job isn't as detailed as the one in Papers, Please, but after processing hundreds of people to see the same movie over and over and over again, I always get some maniacal joy from telling spoiled families, "Sorry, this showing is sold out." Deep down, I grin menacingly, as I watch the passive mother turn sour, and ask if I'm joking. Like I'd bloody joke about a showing being sold out, you whiny b****.

Dark, intimate feelings aside, Papers, Please also offers a healthy dose of self-reflection on your own morality, by posing a lofty question: what would you do at your job if _____? Think of anything to fill in there, and the game throws it at you. Lovers being separated by the border, vigilantes seeking the murderer of their children, and people physically bribing you to let them in. It constantly makes you wonder where your loyality truly lies. Do you find morality in yourself? Perhaps in altruism? Or is it to the government, who gives you your daily pay, from which your family would not survive?

See, you can't just pass over every person carelessly, or accept every pass, because you'll receive citations. The first two of the day are just warnings, but after three starts pay dock. And you earn money from each person you process, so inspection is key. I've heard some friends complain about how hard the game is, but I only had my pay docked twice. I'm a very thorough inspector.

The design of the game's screens even enforces this feeling of isolation and dull monotony. Every day, you see your nonexistent family, read the paper, and walk to the same screen of work. However, the color palette isn't limited to just grey and brown. There's still some color variation in the people themselves, which is a unique design choice, as a man who appreciates aesthetic design.

I'm sure you can tell I really enjoyed Papers, Please. For a long time, I hailed The Last of Us as the best game of 2013... but now I'm beginning to have second doubts. I certainly wouldn't recommend this to anyone who wants to have "fun" (whatever that is), but I do recommend it to anyone who wants to play something totally new. This is a fine addition to my new favorites list, and I'm giving Papers, Please a well-deserved 10/10.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny