Prepare to experience the original man-on-the-run thriller in a completely new way. This is a digital adaptation of John Buchan's incredible book (inspiration to Ian Fleming's James Bond!). Be transported back to 1914 London, where Richard Hannay finds himself framed for a murder he didn't commit.
User reviews:
Recent:
Very Positive (18 reviews) - 100% of the 18 user reviews in the last 30 days are positive.
Overall:
Mostly Positive (802 reviews) - 77% of the 802 user reviews for this game are positive.
Release Date: Apr 25, 2013

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December 15, 2015

Steam Trading Cards Now Available!

We are pleased to announce that The 39 Steps now features Steam Trading Cards. The set brings 5 cards, 3 backgrounds, and 5 emoticons. We hope you enjoy them. Thanks for your continued support.

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About This Game

Prepare to experience the original man-on-the-run thriller in a completely new way. This is a digital adaptation of John Buchan's incredible book (inspiration to Ian Fleming's James Bond!). Be transported back to 1914 London, where Richard Hannay finds himself framed for a murder he didn't commit. Now he must escape the Capital and stay alive long enough to solve the riddle of The Thirty-Nine Steps. There are secrets to be discovered, locations to be explored and - above all - an incredible tale to be told in this ground-breaking interactive novel.

Key Features:

  • A new form of entertainment, merging the worlds of literature, gaming and film into one visually stunning storyline.
  • Faithfully constructed using the original - and best-selling - John Buchan text, first published in 1915.
  • Hundreds of hand-painted digital environments, and authentic materials from 1910s Britain.
  • 8 different storytelling mechanics, 25 collectible items and 16 awards to be unlocked.
  • An original soundtrack by Si Begg and theatrical voice performances, including Ian Hanmore, Greg Hemphill and Benny Young
  • Created in Unity4, with a playtime of 5-8 hours.

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
    Minimum:
    • OS:Windows XP
    • Processor:2GHz Processor
    • Memory:2 GB RAM
    • Graphics:DirectX 9 512MB card
    • Hard Drive:2 GB HD space
    • Other Requirements:Broadband Internet connection
    Minimum:
    • OS:OSX
    • Processor:2.2GHz dual core processor
    • Memory:2 GB RAM
    • Graphics:GPU 128MB+
    • Hard Drive:2 GB HD space
    • Other Requirements:Broadband Internet connection
Customer reviews
Customer Review system updated! Learn more
Recent:
Very Positive (18 reviews)
Overall:
Mostly Positive (802 reviews)
Recently Posted
Syndicate XVII
( 6.9 hrs on record )
Posted: May 17
Nice Plot 9/10
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Craigspaz
( 0.3 hrs on record )
Posted: May 15
I would recomend this if you like digital novels.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Unpageable
( 9.9 hrs on record )
Posted: May 13
Product received for free
This title is an interactive novel that has the trappings of a Point-&-Click game, but mostly a linear affair bound by its adaptation of an existing work. No need to fret however, since there is much to praise over its graphics, music and most importantly – plot that would hold you on suspense for its entire duration.

While I avoid spoiling the story for you, I can safely say The 39 Steps revolved around a conspiracy, set in a turbulent era just prior to World War One. As Richard Hannay, you’ll have to negotiate a passage through treacherous terrain, along with an equally treacherous world of espionage to uncover the truth. Since this was written by John Buchan and not some contemporary hack, I have yet to find someone who thought the plot was boring.

This adaptation however, held an odd twist, a bigger conspiracy hidden. I believe the developers had laden this game liberally with subliminal messages, telling me to eat and drink excessively at every given chance. I did not place this accusation lightly and I’ll list out my observations as evidence. Throughout the game’s duration, the protagonist would: -

Palate the many palettes of fine whiskey.
Cure a hangover with full English breakfast.
Discuss the merits of brandy while travelling light on train.
Savour fresh organic produce in an idyllic farm.
Sample various Scottish cuisines by a road side inn.
Show a fierce steak no quarters in a noble’s hunting lodge.
Devour a traditional sandwich upon the Scottish highlands.
Scoff down ginger biscuits under a star-lit sky.
Valiantly vanquish a pork pie while fooling the main villain.
Learn that muffins go well with marmalade.
Puff up to cloud nine over an assortment of cigars and pipes.
And that it is always a good sport to interrupt your enemy's dinner.

The pace of Richard Hannay was literally set by meals and the man will eat at every opportunity available. While the game can be strangely patriotic in British culture at times, I was taught first hand to never mess with a Scotsman on a full stomach. Seriously, playing this game made me hungry more than anything.

Jokes aside, I was very impressed by the level of art presented in each scene, of which all seemed to be drawn by hand and occasionally animated too. It was definitely a higher standard than what I was used to in other visual novels. Same goes for the music, which is just as suspenseful as the story itself, the two complimented each other very well.

If you are looking for a good distraction that will last around six hours, you should look at this underrated gem. As for me, I enjoyed every minute of it. I will recommend you to play this with a full stomach however, or you’ll end up depleting your stock of snacks as precariously as I did.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
greyatnight
( 4.6 hrs on record )
Posted: May 12
This is a beauiful production -- but it's difficult to classify it as a game. Basically, it walks you through a dramatization of John Buchan's book, "The 39 Steps". As stated on the store page, this is a precursor of a great amount of more recent spy fiction, and I'd both read the book and seen a movie production (Hitchcock, as I recall) before buying this one. This notwithstanding, I finished it because seeing how the developers fleshed it out was addictive in itself. The game aspect (such as it is) comes from ensuring that you pick up all the "point and clicks" -- although the disclaimer says correctly that it not point and click oriented. A few comments more: first, there is very little video per se, and the sequences, while well done, are flat and cartoonish. Second, you will never see the characters except as semi-transparent, "ghost" images, and in well-done protraits that appear on a few screens. Third, there are are a number of "follow the pattern on the screen" instances that on my system called for me to hold down the mouse button and crudely mimic the pattern, which really add nothing to the experience. In summary, I DO recommend the production, but describing it as a game will, in my view, raise expectations that won't be fulfilled in many gamers.

By the way, Buchan wrote a sequel named "Greenmantle" featuring the hero of the reviewed work, and I encourage the developers to look at it for their next effort if they aren't already doing it (which I'm almost certain they are.)
Helpful? Yes No Funny
SenTrax
( 5.3 hrs on record )
Posted: May 2
It took a bit to get used to the style of presentation, however after that I definitely found it entertaining. Not much more to say. If the sound of an audio book combined with a visual novel sounds appealing to you, give this a shot. If that's not your type of thing, you're probably not going to like it.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
The Mendozer
( 5.3 hrs on record )
Posted: May 2
A wonderful blend of visual novel storytelling and interactive playability is The 39 Steps. Travel back in time with me, as we make passage into the early 1900's London as you the player must free his good name from corruption and conspiracy as a framed man for the murder of an intel spy. Move from the comforts of one's London flat into the spacious hills of Scottland in hopes of avoiding the police units and hired muscle of the black stone crew.

With achievements and badge progression this title is progressive on profiles and the story is quite interesting. Can be completed in a single playthrough why not pass the buck for this gem. Id recommend this peek for anyone.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
JacquesLeSauve
( 6.8 hrs on record )
Posted: May 1
Come, sit with me by the fire a moment, you smart, youthful, effervescent, irresistably attractive gamer you. I'd like to have a chat with you about modern life, if I may. There's a really good point to all this, I promise.

There's way too much content out there right now. And no matter what it is you're in to, you'll never be able to get through everything you want. Whether you're a TV show enthusiast or a movie lover, you're high on sound or big on gaming, an avid fan of all the latest comic books or works of highbrow literature, or just a dedicated follower of the art scene or certain, ummm... specialist videos found throughout the internet, whatever's your bag, there's more going on than any mere mortal would ever be able to keep up with. And that's even if you're only into one of these things. If you're into a few then, well... yeah, you're basically boned.

There's more content to consume now than ever before, and that statement will only ever continue to be more and more true as time goes on. There used to be a time when content creation was something reserved for the elites, for people with access to the proper equipment and money needed to produce something then distribute it to the masses, and we pretty much had to be content with whatever scraps we were given. But now, the doors have been blown wide open for just about everyone. No longer do you need a big expensive studio to make music or record film. Even amazing games can be created in a bedroom then reach a global audience more easily than ever. All you need is a microphone or a camera and a computer with internet access and you already have the basics to get started for so many things. I don't know about you, but I think that's pretty bloody mind-blowing.

The great thing about that? We're now spoiled for choice for how we want to pass the time and entertain ourselves. The bad thing? We now have to be incredibly fussy about what we consume and time now becomes one of our most valuable commodities as we have less of it to decide whether something is worth sticking with or if we want to move on to the next thing. And that's before even in factoring real life into the equation. We might have family or relationship stuff to deal with, or work or education matters to attend to. There's a lot going on for everyone. The result is that we now have to decide pretty damn quickly if we want to spend time on something. If it doesn't grab us immediately, then there's a million and one other things all screaming for our attention. Personally, I've never read a comic book in my life because the sheer volume of history there has essentially made that medium impenetrable for me at this stage. I used to play music but those days are far behind me now. Even TV and movies are fast dwindling in my life. I've made my bed with videogames, and now I'm lying in it. So, "Just what in the name of Jiminy Christmas does this have to do with The 39 Steps?", I hear you ask. Well, I don't read books either. But his made me realise gaming is the perfect gateway into so many other things.

More visual novel than game, The 39 Steps is based on the book of the same name, a tale about a prospector and war veteran who leaves his African adventuring behind in the early 1900s and returns to his original home of England for the quiet life, only to soon find himself embroiled in an international conspiracy set to plunge nations into war with each other. What unfolds is a spy thriller as the hero, Richard Hannay, must avoid the clutches of the conspirators whilst also trying to gather proof to expose them and clear his name of a crime they have set him up as the perpetrator of. And so he goes, on a merry chase across the highlands of Scotland, meeting a colourful cast of characters along the way, as he tries to outwit his pursuers and do his best to stay one move ahead along the way.

The presentation is beautiful, as an array of backgrounds are presented to us throughout every scene, and ambient audio sets the mood for us, along with the occasional splattering of music and voice acting. The art style can vary depending on the scene, cleverly introducing us to the tone of a particular character or scenario, before then returning to the more traditional, realistic, painted look for the rest of the story. There are occasional moments of interaction beyond clicking a button to read the next piece of text, such as examining the setting in a room or flipping through newspapers or assembling items that progress the story, but for the most part it's a pretty passive affair as you'll largely be reading your way from one part to the next.

While it wasn't perfect, and some parts of the story felt like they were either meandering or getting repetitive in parts (I swear some of it felt like it was just an advertisement from the Scottish Tourism Board, dwelling on how stunning the scenery was or basking in the charm and generosity of the locals) overall I really enjoyed reading this - and that's what I found so amazing about it. Were this simply some pages and ink, or some text on a screen, I don't think I would have been nearly as involved as I was. But add some nice art and production values to it, gamify it a little and throw in some achievements for me to get, and I'll play the hell out of it. It made me realise this could be the way to get gamers into so many other things, a Trojan horse of sorts to expose us to more great literature or art or to be used as a tool for learning.

There's so much that could be done to exploit the medium of gaming to branch it out and reach wider audiences than so many things might by themselves. I mean, of the people who played/read this, how many would have actually sat down with the novel of their own volition otherwise? Provided it was based on the right source material, and handled with as much reverence and style as it with this, then they really could be onto something here. So, while this shines as a great example and starting point for what could be done with other pieces of media outside gaming, it's also a really great experience in its own right. I'm really glad I took the chance on it (and hope lots of others do, too) and look forward even more to seeing what else I'll be introduced to in future.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
@geewonii
( 3.8 hrs on record )
Posted: May 1
“I believe everything out of the common. The only thing to distrust is the normal.” ― John Buchan, The 39 Steps
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Night_Wing
( 7.6 hrs on record )
Posted: April 27
I believe this game come from some kind of novel with the same title. I don't the story but I personally enjoy this game through every sequences. Starting when you framed as a murderer and you ran away to find the culprit and reveal their secrets. No options to be made in this game, but you need to find some items and clue to lead you to do the next plan.

The graphic is good even though there no clear image of person on the entire game (just a white shadow). The sound, definitely can't be ignored because the strength of the story can reach beyond my expectation because it's sound.

For collector, This game has trading cards and also easy 100% achievement.

Helpful? Yes No Funny
Sepp
( 4.4 hrs on record )
Posted: April 21
I enjoyed it...
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Lord Izotop the NekroCleric
( 4.6 hrs on record )
Posted: April 20
Do i recommend this title???
YES!
YES!
YES!

But.......
You must know one thing about this product. THIS IS NOT A GAME!!!!
This is a novel with a little interaction.
You don't have any decision making events. just something to entertain you while you read and listen to it.

So basically if you didn't read book and you want taste of something different from book reading then this is a title for you.
If you want interactive novel or a game.... look for something different.

I love it.
It is a nice espionage thriller with beautiful, hand painted graphics.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Overlord Jr.
( 5.2 hrs on record )
Posted: April 18
Very cool linear visual novel with no interactive choices, beautiful artwork, music and great presentation. Thrilling yet relaxing experience
Helpful? Yes No Funny
rhiannon_3r45mu5
( 5.8 hrs on record )
Posted: April 10
Interesting attempt to work a new way to tell a story, yet, in my opinion, was a let down. Maybe is the interaction, or the lack thereof. Perhaps the original story isnt just that good.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Acerayl
( 7.0 hrs on record )
Posted: April 8
This is a step up from an audio book. The voice acting is wonderful and the visuals help those who have never been around that environment before. Some of the characters are silhouette so it still leaves your imagination to run while playing/listening to the game. This would be a good next step above an audio book format and wish other classics were available like this. I read the book before, and this just made the experience better, since much of the scenery in my mind was different than what is portrayed here, and this visual experience made the story much better.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Norman Bates
( 3.9 hrs on record )
Posted: April 8
I read on the discussion boards that this game is classified as an "interactive book". I'd agree with that.

I was very impressed with this game. I played at night, in a dark room for a full submersive effect. For 5 hours I was lost in the world of Richard Hannay, a witty and resilient Brit who must evade capture across the UK as he attempts to prove his innocence and foil an international assassination plot directly preceding WWI. Fans of early 20th century European History and Black Hand enthusiasts would definitely want to take a look at this.

If you are looking for a way to escape this hellish joke that we call a "life", The 39 Steps is what you're looking for.

I hope to see this genre boom, especially as VR tech becomes more commonplace.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
N@stюша
( 1.8 hrs on record )
Posted: March 25
Совсем не то, что ожидала. Игра получилась ну очень необычной. Точнее - необычно скучной.
Во-первых, очень много текстов (которые не всегда легко читаются) при малом количестве действий.
Во-вторых, интерьеры нарисованы замечательно, вот только наблюдать за белыми пятнами вместо героев во время диалогов совсем неинтересно.
И третье, очень много графических багов, здесь и проблемы с расширением экрана при загрузке, и просто непонятные черные полосы, и прочее.
Итог: не хватило терпения даже на 3 эпизода этой тягомотины. Единственное спасибо разработчикам - за карточки:)
Helpful? Yes No Funny
nikisss69
( 6.2 hrs on record )
Posted: March 23
Very nice. vould not pay over $8, as I can play it only once
Helpful? Yes No Funny
CLaSH
( 8.1 hrs on record )
Posted: March 18
Not unless you're into historical events and visual novels, this is one of the more "interactive" visual novels you can read or listen to as for the "game" itself provides rather impressive audio and visuals.

Although I myself haven't seen the movie adaptation nor read the book, this was definitely a one-of-a-kind experience. Even with the majority of the game consisting of still images it still felt somewhat of a movie to me as each change in events involved a cinematic transition. But again, it's still technically just an E-book. Don't get too excited kiddies, although I stated that this game's interactivity is higher than other novels, it still has as much interactivity as a vending machine. :P

Helpful? Yes No Funny
Whilyam
( 5.5 hrs on record )
Posted: March 15
TL:DR: This is an interactive storybook. It's not bad.

In almost every way this is the same a picture book being read to you. This should be the mindset you go in with. If you're a fan of that, I think it does a pretty good job of telling the story and making exploration of the screen rewarding. It is also point and click. If you demand your digital people run around and do digital people things, this is not your game.

The major issue with this game is its interface. As I gather, this is/was a test for adapting novels into video games. Admirable, but you might want to try and hire someone who can make the interface easier to use. Buttons sometimes take a while to register as clicked, keyboard functions are unintuitive, and if you hit Esc at the title screen, you just exit the game, which is pretty generally accepted these days to be a lazy way of quitting a game.

There's also achievements and picture cards of different characters that, while I enjoy the cards, the achievements are really bad in that they never show you your progress through them. I was lucky to have clicked everything to qualify for one of them.

Overall, this game is a pretty good gift for someone into point and click adventures and narrative storytelling
Verdict: Get this game on sale >50% off
Helpful? Yes No Funny
chiken
( 0.1 hrs on record )
Posted: March 6
ITS SUCKS SO MUH DIK U WEL DI F U PLY IT
M8
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Most Helpful Reviews  In the past 30 days
8 of 8 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
6.8 hrs on record
Posted: May 1
Come, sit with me by the fire a moment, you smart, youthful, effervescent, irresistably attractive gamer you. I'd like to have a chat with you about modern life, if I may. There's a really good point to all this, I promise.

There's way too much content out there right now. And no matter what it is you're in to, you'll never be able to get through everything you want. Whether you're a TV show enthusiast or a movie lover, you're high on sound or big on gaming, an avid fan of all the latest comic books or works of highbrow literature, or just a dedicated follower of the art scene or certain, ummm... specialist videos found throughout the internet, whatever's your bag, there's more going on than any mere mortal would ever be able to keep up with. And that's even if you're only into one of these things. If you're into a few then, well... yeah, you're basically boned.

There's more content to consume now than ever before, and that statement will only ever continue to be more and more true as time goes on. There used to be a time when content creation was something reserved for the elites, for people with access to the proper equipment and money needed to produce something then distribute it to the masses, and we pretty much had to be content with whatever scraps we were given. But now, the doors have been blown wide open for just about everyone. No longer do you need a big expensive studio to make music or record film. Even amazing games can be created in a bedroom then reach a global audience more easily than ever. All you need is a microphone or a camera and a computer with internet access and you already have the basics to get started for so many things. I don't know about you, but I think that's pretty bloody mind-blowing.

The great thing about that? We're now spoiled for choice for how we want to pass the time and entertain ourselves. The bad thing? We now have to be incredibly fussy about what we consume and time now becomes one of our most valuable commodities as we have less of it to decide whether something is worth sticking with or if we want to move on to the next thing. And that's before even in factoring real life into the equation. We might have family or relationship stuff to deal with, or work or education matters to attend to. There's a lot going on for everyone. The result is that we now have to decide pretty damn quickly if we want to spend time on something. If it doesn't grab us immediately, then there's a million and one other things all screaming for our attention. Personally, I've never read a comic book in my life because the sheer volume of history there has essentially made that medium impenetrable for me at this stage. I used to play music but those days are far behind me now. Even TV and movies are fast dwindling in my life. I've made my bed with videogames, and now I'm lying in it. So, "Just what in the name of Jiminy Christmas does this have to do with The 39 Steps?", I hear you ask. Well, I don't read books either. But his made me realise gaming is the perfect gateway into so many other things.

More visual novel than game, The 39 Steps is based on the book of the same name, a tale about a prospector and war veteran who leaves his African adventuring behind in the early 1900s and returns to his original home of England for the quiet life, only to soon find himself embroiled in an international conspiracy set to plunge nations into war with each other. What unfolds is a spy thriller as the hero, Richard Hannay, must avoid the clutches of the conspirators whilst also trying to gather proof to expose them and clear his name of a crime they have set him up as the perpetrator of. And so he goes, on a merry chase across the highlands of Scotland, meeting a colourful cast of characters along the way, as he tries to outwit his pursuers and do his best to stay one move ahead along the way.

The presentation is beautiful, as an array of backgrounds are presented to us throughout every scene, and ambient audio sets the mood for us, along with the occasional splattering of music and voice acting. The art style can vary depending on the scene, cleverly introducing us to the tone of a particular character or scenario, before then returning to the more traditional, realistic, painted look for the rest of the story. There are occasional moments of interaction beyond clicking a button to read the next piece of text, such as examining the setting in a room or flipping through newspapers or assembling items that progress the story, but for the most part it's a pretty passive affair as you'll largely be reading your way from one part to the next.

While it wasn't perfect, and some parts of the story felt like they were either meandering or getting repetitive in parts (I swear some of it felt like it was just an advertisement from the Scottish Tourism Board, dwelling on how stunning the scenery was or basking in the charm and generosity of the locals) overall I really enjoyed reading this - and that's what I found so amazing about it. Were this simply some pages and ink, or some text on a screen, I don't think I would have been nearly as involved as I was. But add some nice art and production values to it, gamify it a little and throw in some achievements for me to get, and I'll play the hell out of it. It made me realise this could be the way to get gamers into so many other things, a Trojan horse of sorts to expose us to more great literature or art or to be used as a tool for learning.

There's so much that could be done to exploit the medium of gaming to branch it out and reach wider audiences than so many things might by themselves. I mean, of the people who played/read this, how many would have actually sat down with the novel of their own volition otherwise? Provided it was based on the right source material, and handled with as much reverence and style as it with this, then they really could be onto something here. So, while this shines as a great example and starting point for what could be done with other pieces of media outside gaming, it's also a really great experience in its own right. I'm really glad I took the chance on it (and hope lots of others do, too) and look forward even more to seeing what else I'll be introduced to in future.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
4 of 4 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
5.3 hrs on record
Posted: May 2
A wonderful blend of visual novel storytelling and interactive playability is The 39 Steps. Travel back in time with me, as we make passage into the early 1900's London as you the player must free his good name from corruption and conspiracy as a framed man for the murder of an intel spy. Move from the comforts of one's London flat into the spacious hills of Scottland in hopes of avoiding the police units and hired muscle of the black stone crew.

With achievements and badge progression this title is progressive on profiles and the story is quite interesting. Can be completed in a single playthrough why not pass the buck for this gem. Id recommend this peek for anyone.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
3 of 3 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
9.9 hrs on record
Posted: May 13
Product received for free
This title is an interactive novel that has the trappings of a Point-&-Click game, but mostly a linear affair bound by its adaptation of an existing work. No need to fret however, since there is much to praise over its graphics, music and most importantly – plot that would hold you on suspense for its entire duration.

While I avoid spoiling the story for you, I can safely say The 39 Steps revolved around a conspiracy, set in a turbulent era just prior to World War One. As Richard Hannay, you’ll have to negotiate a passage through treacherous terrain, along with an equally treacherous world of espionage to uncover the truth. Since this was written by John Buchan and not some contemporary hack, I have yet to find someone who thought the plot was boring.

This adaptation however, held an odd twist, a bigger conspiracy hidden. I believe the developers had laden this game liberally with subliminal messages, telling me to eat and drink excessively at every given chance. I did not place this accusation lightly and I’ll list out my observations as evidence. Throughout the game’s duration, the protagonist would: -

Palate the many palettes of fine whiskey.
Cure a hangover with full English breakfast.
Discuss the merits of brandy while travelling light on train.
Savour fresh organic produce in an idyllic farm.
Sample various Scottish cuisines by a road side inn.
Show a fierce steak no quarters in a noble’s hunting lodge.
Devour a traditional sandwich upon the Scottish highlands.
Scoff down ginger biscuits under a star-lit sky.
Valiantly vanquish a pork pie while fooling the main villain.
Learn that muffins go well with marmalade.
Puff up to cloud nine over an assortment of cigars and pipes.
And that it is always a good sport to interrupt your enemy's dinner.

The pace of Richard Hannay was literally set by meals and the man will eat at every opportunity available. While the game can be strangely patriotic in British culture at times, I was taught first hand to never mess with a Scotsman on a full stomach. Seriously, playing this game made me hungry more than anything.

Jokes aside, I was very impressed by the level of art presented in each scene, of which all seemed to be drawn by hand and occasionally animated too. It was definitely a higher standard than what I was used to in other visual novels. Same goes for the music, which is just as suspenseful as the story itself, the two complimented each other very well.

If you are looking for a good distraction that will last around six hours, you should look at this underrated gem. As for me, I enjoyed every minute of it. I will recommend you to play this with a full stomach however, or you’ll end up depleting your stock of snacks as precariously as I did.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
1 of 2 people (50%) found this review helpful
Recommended
7.6 hrs on record
Posted: April 27
I believe this game come from some kind of novel with the same title. I don't the story but I personally enjoy this game through every sequences. Starting when you framed as a murderer and you ran away to find the culprit and reveal their secrets. No options to be made in this game, but you need to find some items and clue to lead you to do the next plan.

The graphic is good even though there no clear image of person on the entire game (just a white shadow). The sound, definitely can't be ignored because the strength of the story can reach beyond my expectation because it's sound.

For collector, This game has trading cards and also easy 100% achievement.

Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
Most Helpful Reviews  In the past 90 days
1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
5.2 hrs on record
Posted: April 18
Very cool linear visual novel with no interactive choices, beautiful artwork, music and great presentation. Thrilling yet relaxing experience
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
7.0 hrs on record
Posted: April 8
This is a step up from an audio book. The voice acting is wonderful and the visuals help those who have never been around that environment before. Some of the characters are silhouette so it still leaves your imagination to run while playing/listening to the game. This would be a good next step above an audio book format and wish other classics were available like this. I read the book before, and this just made the experience better, since much of the scenery in my mind was different than what is portrayed here, and this visual experience made the story much better.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
2 of 3 people (67%) found this review helpful
Recommended
5.0 hrs on record
Posted: February 25
A very nice storytelling Visual Novel in the early 19th Century of the British Empire with great british and scotts dialects and purely fine Sounds.

Pros
Excellent story and narration.
Excellent voice acting
Very well curated artworks and visual effects
Very particular playing style

Cons
N/A
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2 of 3 people (67%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
5.8 hrs on record
Posted: April 10
Interesting attempt to work a new way to tell a story, yet, in my opinion, was a let down. Maybe is the interaction, or the lack thereof. Perhaps the original story isnt just that good.
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1 of 2 people (50%) found this review helpful
Recommended
4.6 hrs on record
Posted: April 20
Do i recommend this title???
YES!
YES!
YES!

But.......
You must know one thing about this product. THIS IS NOT A GAME!!!!
This is a novel with a little interaction.
You don't have any decision making events. just something to entertain you while you read and listen to it.

So basically if you didn't read book and you want taste of something different from book reading then this is a title for you.
If you want interactive novel or a game.... look for something different.

I love it.
It is a nice espionage thriller with beautiful, hand painted graphics.
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1 of 2 people (50%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
1.8 hrs on record
Posted: March 25
Совсем не то, что ожидала. Игра получилась ну очень необычной. Точнее - необычно скучной.
Во-первых, очень много текстов (которые не всегда легко читаются) при малом количестве действий.
Во-вторых, интерьеры нарисованы замечательно, вот только наблюдать за белыми пятнами вместо героев во время диалогов совсем неинтересно.
И третье, очень много графических багов, здесь и проблемы с расширением экрана при загрузке, и просто непонятные черные полосы, и прочее.
Итог: не хватило терпения даже на 3 эпизода этой тягомотины. Единственное спасибо разработчикам - за карточки:)
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Most Helpful Reviews  In the past 180 days
47 of 51 people (92%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
Recommended
6.9 hrs on record
Posted: January 31
“I believe everything out of the common. The only thing to distrust is the normal.” ― John Buchan, The 39 Steps

The Thirty-Nine Steps is originally an adventure novel and an ancestor of the spy thriller genre, written by the Scottish author John Buchan in 1915 - the first year of the World War I. It has long been reinterpreted into various other media - including Alfred Hitchcock's famous 1935 silver screen interpretation. But it is the first time we see Buchan's famous action-hero, Richard Hannay in a video game, thanks to Story Mechanics' initiative with a project of reinterpreting literature as narrative video games.

Here at the start of his adventures, Richard Hannay is a wealthy and able English gentleman with considerable social standing. He was raised in South Africa, became a successful mining engineer and took part in the Matabele Wars. He also served as an intelligence officer during the Boer War. He is realistic, self-sufficient with a diverse set of skills and means. Just before the events of the game, Hannay returns to London, only to find the routine life of a Londoner to be devastatingly boring. Just as he was about to give up on the capital, he is visited by one of his neighbors at his apartment in London. The neighbor reveals himself to be Franklin P. Scudder, a freelance spy and asks Hannay's help with a dangerous political plot. Finding himself in a web of lies and intrigue, Hannay quickly becomes the target of a manhunt, and starts his escape towards the Highlands of Scotland. Will he ever be able to clean his name and prevent a dangerous plot that would spell doom for all Europe?

The 39 Steps is a retelling of the original novel without nearly any content cut down. The atmosphere is a wondrous success weaved out of water color environments, characters displayed as foggy silhouettes and tales that belong to characters reenacted by shadowy silent motion pictures. The display is wholly elegant and thrilling, appropriate for the tone of the narration. Voice acting is marvelous - with nuances, accents and even vocal exclamations. For the part of the presentation, you are in for a feast.

As for the gameplay, on the other hand, the same cannot be said. Yes, the game is basically a visual novel but the player's participation in the narration is close to non-existent. The game could even be categorized as non-interactive considering all you actually do is some clicking to do to reveal environmental details or some mouse movements to draw certain shapes for Hannay to interact with things now and then. There is nothing you actually do, decide or participate in. You click and watch as the story unravels. On that part, one could actually prefer reading the novel rather than playing the game, but the amount of labor put into display is certainly admirable.

For the last verdict, I'll bite and recommend The 39 Steps, considering newer generations prefer watching the story through a screen rather than actually reading it. You just have to know what you are getting yourselves into before buying it. The 39 Steps is not a game; it is a beautifully arranged digital story book, and one that I can safely recommend if you are unfamiliar with the novel and/or bear no intention of reading it.

Please also check out Lady Storyteller's Curator page here - follow for regular updates on reviews for other games!
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11 of 11 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
9.4 hrs on record
Posted: February 6
Personal Rating: Had a really great experience playing it.
Classic Rating: ★★★★✬

The 39 Steps is a digital/visual adaptation of an adventure/crime novel by
John Buchan: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Thirty-Nine_Steps .

http://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=616520995

✓ Excellent story and narration.
✓ Excellent voice acting (even though I'm not a native English speaker, I had a couple of good laughs listening to some Scottish side-character).
✓ Very well curated artworks and visual effects (transitions and animations).
✓ Very particular playing style, common to Visual Novels but original nonetheless.

http://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=616003461

✘ A couple of times subtitles were missing.
✘ Sometimes I had difficulties understanding words and phrases too: I know, this is my fault, not the game's one but it can be a good enough topic for non-English people to think about before buying.

Would you like to read a book while listening to characters voices, ambient sounds and background music? Would it be even better if you were able to watch it like a movie and enjoy like you were its protagonist?

If the answer to those questions is "yes", than you'll understand why "The 39 Steps" is a must to play game.
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9 of 9 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
7.7 hrs on record
Posted: December 7, 2015
The 39 Steps is a famous adventure thriller novel by John Buchan that released in 1915. This novel had several movie adaptation, and the first movie adaptation directed by Alfred Hitchcock in 1935. And this game is a digital adaptation of John Buchan's novel, it is different to compared to another Visual Novel games. This game is not like that.

I like The Story Mechanics treatment about this game, they presentation of this game made me feel that I watch a thriller movie than playing a game. The storytelling is masterpiece. The soundtrack is very good, it blend with the atmosphere of the scene and sometimes made me nervous about the next scene. The voice acting is superb, especially english gaelic accent of the scotslands peoples.

Well, this digital adaptation is an alternative way to read a famous literature, I'll hope The Story Mechanics made another adaptation of famous literature by famous writer. And I'm highly recommended this game to anyone interested in good storytelling games.
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7 of 7 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
4.6 hrs on record
Posted: December 14, 2015
Edit: I had to cut down my review a bit because it seems Steam is experiencing a bug.

As someone who hadn't previously read the book or seen the play/movie, I have to say this definitely made me want to read/watch.

It started off pretty slow, (again I'm sure someone will pick up this game having no prior knowledge of this story) I had a problem where whenever I would alternate to a different window to do something, even when pausing the game, it would not let me continue, instead it would restart the chapter I was currently on, which can get annoying as I'm a very easily distracted person. Nonetheless, solving that would just mean putting your undivided attention into the game, at least until the end of that chapter (which is a good thing as this is more of an interactive story rather than a game, you wouldn't want to miss precious plot)

Anyway, the water colour landscape art is absolutely stunning, and added suspense in a way that really made you listen to what was being said and at times forced you to visualize the situation yourself, with the help of some awesome first person narration. I bought this game a while back on a third person game bundle site for a few bucks at most. Would I spend $15 on this game? No. But I am broke so I'm speaking from the stance of an empty walleted person.

All in all this game is relaxing, suspenseful, and to a degree educational. I'd recommend this game to those who want something that they can casually unwind to, without much effort on their part.
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4 of 4 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
3.9 hrs on record
Posted: December 22, 2015
If you don’t mind a game with almost no gameplay elements and you are looking for something diferent to relax in the cold winter, 39 Steps might be the game you are looking for. Sit back, get warm and grab a cup of tea or coffee because you will only need to move your mouse every now and then. You play as Richard Hannay, a man from London during 1914 with a boring life whose fate changed after a certain event. Now, he’s being chased by a crime he didn’t commit. And that’s when the story gets interesting.

The game reads like a book, and you won’t have any choices to make like, say, a Telltale game. You just explore your surroundings, read some descriptions, and move on with the story. The game does not lie about this, their premise is really honest and you should know what you are getting into, you will be reading a digital book with some clicks here and there. As the story goes, tension will go up as things may get troublesome in the road making Hannay finding different means to get what he want weather by escaping, stealing or using his wits and words with strangers. The visuals of the game are calm with vibrant colors. They are hand painted with minor movements like the wind and it will remind you of some old point & click adventure games. During your play through you will also find some collectibles by explorations. These are very hard to miss, especially if you are playing the game carefully and take your time to look at the scenario before being done with it.

After 4 hours I finished the game and I do not find any reason to play it again. It’s a different experience and it was something I rather enjoyed. The final chapters make the conclusion satisfying and I was engaged in the game from start to finish. When I finished a chapter I just had to go to the next one as I was too curious to know what was going to happen or how Hanney is going to find a solution for his current problem. Because there’s almost no gameplay mechanics involved this games ended being quite relaxing. You can be very tired after a long day at work sipping your hot beverage while playing 39 Steps and it’s going to be a nice experience.
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4 of 4 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
7.3 hrs on record
Posted: January 6
All visual novels i’ve come across seem to follow that choose-your-own-adventure line while catering to a very certain, slightly perverted, teenage fanbase.

This instead is what you could call a multimedia thriller, combining the classic narrative with beautiful hand drawn backdrops, fitting audio and some basic animations. All combined it makes for a very immersive experience, and with the excellent quality of the source material writing there is an actually gripping story driving the game forward.

It was a captivating 4 hours experience that changed my conception of what can be done within the rigid structure of a visual novel. Highly recommended as such.
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9 of 14 people (64%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
2.1 hrs on record
Posted: December 18, 2015
I don't feel like this game is as interactive as it could be, or at all. It feels more of just a visual novel, the other annoying aspect is whenever I Alt-Tabbed out, it would completely start over from the very start and not let me skip through cut scenes and that I had already watched. Never been a huge fan of visual novels, this game is visually easy on the eyes, the art is fantastic and the voice acting is very good, I also really enjoyed the soundtrack. But the gameplay itself is severely lacking and the constant starting over if I had to alt-tab out really ruined it for me.
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3 of 3 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
6.8 hrs on record
Posted: February 8
A fantastic visual novel. You can play the game with just your mouse, but you still feel immersed in the story. I enjoyed the way the dialogues were plotted out, and the way you get to see inside Hannay's mind through text over some very gorgeous imagery. Fans of the book will love it, and maybe some who play it will go out and read the novel. When it is on sale there's no reason not to buy it!
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4 of 5 people (80%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
Recommended
5.0 hrs on record
Posted: December 20, 2015
The 39 Steps é um jogo que conta uma história de um conto policial, com um engenheiro que quase se tornou um detetive (com a sorte e ajuda de outrem) e com um pouco de mistério. Este jogo tem um quê de Sherlock Holmes (inclusive faz referência ao personagem, à saga e ao autor Arthur Conan Doyle). A história é bem interessante, mas demonstra faltar alguns pontos chaves com elementos não tão detalhados e simplificados (subjetivos).

Sobre a jogabilidade em si, você não precisa fazer muita coisa. Basta ler tudo o que o narrador-personagem vai contar (que é o protagonista) e clicar em coisas brilhantes que te chamam a atenção e que o personagem vai notar e usar junto aos seus conhecimentos para dar continuidade à história (semelhante a um Hidden Object). As cutscenes do jogo mostram ambientes bonitos e bem feitos (que parecem telas pintadas ou fotos antigas de lugares a céu aberto ou ambientes bem mobilhados). Você ainda tem a possibilidade de fazer desenhos com o mouse (nos momentos em que o personagem vai abrir portas - normalmente, nada de arrombar - ou abrir janelas, garrafas. O jogo indica no canto da dela a quantidade de coisas que você pode encontrar no ambiente para ajudar seu personagem e a quantidade de parágrafos que você também vai passar por . Além disso, a história contada pelo personagem só dá continuidade quando você dá um clique com um mouse para ela passar ao próximo texto narrado. No mais, a história segue seu curso e você não faz muitas interferências (no máximo pular as cutscenes e entender nada da história e perder conquistas do jogo por causa disso).

A OST do jogo, apesar de não ser tão diversa nos diferentes momentos da história é boa. Acho que se encaixa bem no que o jogo propõe e os sons utilizados também.

Por fim, eu gostei do jogo, porém acho que ele foi pouco explorado. Ele tem uma proposta muito boa (pelo menos para mim) e poderia ter sido mais legal ainda com poucas mudanças. Mas entendo que a proposta talvez tenha sido essa desde o início, e é um modo de contar uma história.

7/10.
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4 of 5 people (80%) found this review helpful
Recommended
7.6 hrs on record
Posted: December 19, 2015
Not terrible for an interactive story sort of "game." A bit slow but the music sets the tone rather well and once you've adjusted to the pace it is well executed. Story is part entertaining spy yarn, part silly patriotic English mumbo-jumbo. I got it on sale - otherwise I'd have never bothered. For those that like this sort of thing, this is the sort of thing they'd like.
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