Also known as Out Of This World™, Another World is a pioneer action/platformer that released across more than a dozen platforms since its debut in 1991. Along the years, Another World™ has attained cult status among critics and sophisticated gamers alike.
User reviews: Very Positive (472 reviews)
Release Date: Apr 4, 2013

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Reviews

“Another World is a landmark game for a host of reasons, from the 2D polygonal work to its excellent narrative.”
8.5/10 – IGN

“A great example of how to offer a classic game to a new audience with improved graphics and sound for a low price.”
8/10 – Destructoid

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About This Game

Also known as Out Of This World™, Another World is a pioneer action/platformer that released across more than a dozen platforms since its debut in 1991. Along the years, Another World™ has attained cult status among critics and sophisticated gamers alike.

Another World™ chronicles the story of Lester Knight Chaykin a young scientist hurtled through space and time by a nuclear experiment that goes wrong. In an alien and inhospitable world, you will have to dodge, outwit, and overcome the host of alien monsters, while surviving an environment as deadly as your enemies. Only a perfect blend of logic and skill will get you past the deadly obstacles that lie in wait.

Key Features:

  • Remastered presentation: a joint effort between visionary game-designer Eric Chahi and developer DotEmu, Another World is back in its 20th Anniversary Edition with High Definition graphics faithful to the original design.
  • 3 difficulty modes: Normal (easier than original game), Difficult (Equal to original game) and Hardcore (more difficult than original game)
  • A new immersive experience: rediscover a cult adventure with 100% remastered sounds and FX
  • Social features: Steamworks™ integration with 13 achievements.
  • Extra features: development diary, making of video, technical handbook

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
SteamOS + Linux
    • OS: WINDOWS XP SP3/WINDOWS VISTA SP2/WINDOWS 7/WINDOWS 8
    • Processor: 1.6 GHZ
    • Memory: 512 MB/2048 MB (Vista/7/8)
    • Graphics: OpenGL 2.0 compatible
    • Hard Drive: 800 MB
    • OS: MAC OSX 10.7
    • Processor: 1.6 GHZ
    • Memory: 2048 MB
    • Graphics: OpenGL 2.0 compatible
    • Hard Drive: 800 MB
    • OS: Ubuntu 12.10 or similar.
    • Processor: 1.6 GHZ (32 and 64 bit supported)
    • Memory: 2048 MB
    • Graphics: OpenGL 2.0 compatible
    • Hard Drive: 800 MB
Helpful customer reviews
8 of 9 people (89%) found this review helpful
2.6 hrs on record
Posted: November 4
This has been one of the best games I've ever played, and I'm not being nostalgic, I wasn't even born back when the game first came out. This being the very first time I play it.

You're an unexpectedly athletic physic that likes to work alone? Anyway, something goes wrong in your lab, and you get yourself transported to you know where (I mean, look at the name of the game). There you must find a way to get home again, but it's not going to be an easy journey, neither one, that you can make alone.

★★★★★ | Loved it
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2 of 2 people (100%) found this review helpful
0.6 hrs on record
Posted: October 31
A wonderfully artistic adventure/platformer brought to life by French programming genius Eric Chahi. The setting, minimalist storyline and memorable artwork provide a haunting atmosphere that always seems to stick in my head, no matter how long it has been since I've last played through the game.

The basic premise of the gameplay revolves around trial and error. Going in blind, you will die. A lot. However, experienced players will be able to replay this game and complete it usually within 30 minutes. I feel that the short length of the game once one is aware of all of the traps and pitfalls actually works to give this classic more replay value, as I find myself running through it at least once a year out of tradition, and it's still as fun and beautiful as ever. This special Steam edition only serves to enhance the game with higher resolution graphics and is definitely worth purchasing.
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1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
0.5 hrs on record
Posted: November 12
I've been trying to beat this game since I was a child.
Now I can continue that tradition in proper fasion on steam!
I'll never beat it... I can pull a 10.0 any day in any FPS..
But this game basically dressed me up as a little princess and slams a bat up my ♥♥♥♥.
I, don't, know, why. And still, I love it....
And really, I had to buy it as soon as I seen it on steam.
20th anniversary edition, wow..
Yup I'm old!

The updated graphics are honestly awkward as hell and look ugly to me, but they give you the original pixel art option. Which looks beautiful these days. Updated audio is top notch I'd say, but still prefer the original. Options are nice though right?

It's a beautiful game that has always captured my imagination and totally obliterates me everytime I try to progress through it.


Before I die.. I must finish this game. I MUST!!!

Highly reccomended to anyone.
Unique, deep story.. Classic.

Difficult. <3
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1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
0.6 hrs on record
Posted: November 15
This was one of the first games I ever played. I was a kid, it was derpily hard, and I didn't get that far.

It's a perfect re-creation of the original. The reworked graphics are beautiful. If you like classic games, you'll like this.

Highly recommended.
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1 of 2 people (50%) found this review helpful
1.4 hrs on record
Posted: October 26
This game is a classic. It was originally released on PC. One of a kind graphics and art for it's time. This new re-release enhances on the original game without taking away from the original aesthetics. Must have!
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0 of 2 people (0%) found this review helpful
0.1 hrs on record
Posted: October 25
I'd love to write a good review here, but the game is bugged to the max. Using a mouse in fullscreen or windowed mode, the mouse pointer disappears frequently and I could not get the game to actually start gameplay as clicking anywhere on the "intor" screen just goes to settings and stays there.
No planned updates announced, and lots of disgruntled posts in the community.. Good thing my purchase was cheapo. Bring on legislation on unfit for purpose software!
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0 of 3 people (0%) found this review helpful
2.5 hrs on record
Posted: November 14
I love classic adventure games, 2D platformers, and re-releases. So when I saw the 20th Anniversary Edition of Another World (a.k.a. Out of this World) on sale, I swifty snatched it up. I have fond memories of playing through it on (a) SNES (emulator) as kid. I cannot deny that it's a very charming, ambitious and cinematic game, but I also cannot deny that I found my (incredibly short) time with it insanely frustrating and immensely disappointing.

I'll start with what it gets right. This game is beautiful. Absolutely beautiful. The atmosphere, settings and sound design are immaculate. Éric Chahi has crafted a brilliant alien world here, oozing with originality and depth. The characters are loveable, the cutscenes are groundbreaking and well exectuted, and the environments are varied, colourful and stunning. The game is very minimalist, but not in a righteous, narcissistic hipster way, featuring no dialogue or heads-up display. Lester can jump, run and attack. The story is basic, but endearing, and is definitely aided by the cutscenes. You play as Lester, a scientist who screws around with some complex technology and lands himself on a planet, with a hostile alien race (and environment) out to get him. With the help of a rogue alien (lovingly nicknamed Buddy), you must escape. Simple, but effective. To think that this game came out in 1991 is amazing, and still makes my jaw drop. Another World is definitely ahead of its time.

But so, so much holds it back. The game itself is ridiculously hard. I love a challenging game, don't get me wrong. But I like to be punished for my own mistakes, not because I didn't somehow know not to jump down that hole, but that other hole. When you get everything right, it feels totally organic and satisfying. But when you die 5 times before realising that you're not doing what the game wants you to do, it's fricking annoying. Here's a scenario I found particularly irritating. The following is an internal dialogue I had with myself, with many expletives removed:

"How am I supposed to know what this lever does before I pull it? Maybe I should press it now! My buddy is being beaten up! Okay, I'll pull the lever. What the hell? A beam of light? Oh ♥♥♥♥, the guard is coming for me. Yep, dead. Well okay, obviously I have to kill the guard with the beam of light. Oh fricking hell, now I have to do this whole section again. At least I know what to do. Guard, beating me up, COME ON LESTER CRAWL CRAWL CRAWL JESUS YOU'RE SO ♥♥♥♥♥♥♥ SLOW. Okay, lever pulled, guard's down, what should I do now? I'll pull another lever. Oh look, a hole in the ceiling. Alright then. Guess I should crawl back, but how do I get up there? Oh ♥♥♥♥, I'm getting shot at! HURRY THE ♥♥♥♥ UP LESTER! ♥♥♥♥ING HELL I'M DEAD AGAIN NOW I HAVE TO DO THIS ENTIRE THING AGAIN ♥♥♥♥♥♥♥ #$%*#@#!"

One thing that drew me to Another World is that it looked similar to the first two Oddworld games, despite the obvious theme difference and aesthetics. But while the Oddworlds were quite difficult, they were at least fair; you could at least SEE what was going to kill you. In Another World, there is so much trial and error, and when you screw up, you get booted back to the last checkpoint, which in some cases is irritatingly far back.

And the length, good God the length is pitiful. I know it says I've played for 2 hours, but I haven't. I probably passed the game in half of that. The other half was dealing with the constant, and I mean constant, crashes. Word of advice: don't play this game with an Xbox Controller. Otherwise you'll have crashes literally every 2 or 3 minutes. Play it with the keyboard, which will at least minimalise (but not remove) these crashes.

And for being the 20th Anniversary Edition, there really isn't much here. You have the ability to switch from the original Amiga/SNES graphics to a HD redo in-game, à la Halo Anniversary, which is nice, but it looks so... out of place. You have beautiful backgrounds juxtaposed with blocky South Park-esque characters and it just doesn't flow. It's like having cartoon characters on a live-action background. It looks wrong. Sticking with the classic graphics is the best bet for visual consistency.

There's no post-game content either. And a lot of the music is removed from other versions of the game, and in its place is... nothing. What? 20 years? I mean come on, I get that you wanted to use the original soundtrack, that's fine. But in areas where there's no music, why couldn't you just add a couple of songs in from other entries for a more complete experience? In fact, I'd go so far as to say as this is one of the more incomplete versions of the game. The SNES version had more (and far better) music, a more consistent (however slow) framerate, and had more cutscenes, which help establish the backstory. Come on, guys! It's been 20 years! I'm not asking for the world here but when I think of a re-release, I think completeness, not stuff cut out.

It does come with some good extras, but these aren't even accessible in-game. There's a making-of documentary, which is actually really interesting and I highly suggest you watch it. There's one picture and a soundtrack (what's left of it), but most interestingly, Amiga ROMs of the original game, which I find incredibly cool. If you want a more coherent, classic experience, then give that a try. But for me, there just wasn't enough here. The achievements are arbitrary, the presentation is lazy, and there's really nothing at all here for fans of the original game (in fact, there's less). I really wanted to like the game, and I still appreciate it for what it did for the adventure genre all those years ago, but I cannot get past its ridiculous difficulty, bugginess, laziness and lastly, the price. This game is definitely not worth $10.

2.5/5
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1 of 9 people (11%) found this review helpful
2.0 hrs on record
Posted: November 9
The Good:
Redone with nice artsy graphics
Very interesting sci-fi story, much like the cliche dream of the 80s nerd

The Bad:
Virtually all success stems from trial and error
Quite short (considering time spent alive)
Parts with high difficulty without any basis of user control
Poor controls

Another World falls short because parts did not age well. The story and looks are very appealing, and it's even very funny to see different death animations. I even enjoyed this with others watching. However, because failure most often occurs because of ignorance rather than lack of skill or control, Another World is pretty bad for a game. There are many complaints on games for which memory and repetition mean success, but in this case on top of all that are elements unknown to the user such as moving onto the background or creating shields with guns inexplicably. For a few fun moments this game does not cut it.

Another World is a great idea and a bad game.
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3.1 hrs on record
Posted: October 26
Wonderfull game. In fact, I have played it now for the first time so there was no sentiment from my side. But anyway, the game has great atmosphere and I admire the creativity of the author and what he did on his Amiga. I recommend to watch the Making of movie.
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6.0 hrs on record
Posted: November 2
Awesome game! Worth every penny!
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59 of 64 people (92%) found this review helpful
32.6 hrs on record
Posted: September 15
Click here for the full review

In 1991 I first played Another World (also known as Outer World and Out of This World in some regions), a game that would have a greater and more lasting impact on me than any other.

On the surface, it seems clear that Another World is a product of its time, and does not align well to some modern dominant design sensibilities. At the time though, it was pushing the envelope with its use of polygons and 'pixigons' and broke with many established motivational paradigms of the era, relying on a desire to explore and drive through the story rather than achieving a score or preserving lives.

In spite of its vintage, there are things that developer Éric Chahi was able to achieve in Another World that I believe are still relevant, enjoyable and worth aspiring to, even twenty one years after its release.


Upon launching the game, the first thing that stands out is its atmosphere. Within the first moments of the intro cinematic, much of the game's tone is set, as the protagonist Lester (who is only named in the credits) is depicted arriving in his Italian sportscar at an isolated lab on a dark and brooding night. Lester immediately comes across as being successful, independent and yet lonely as he is greeted by the lab's AI and seats himself at a solitary workstation. The cinematic's score echoes this, playing an eerie isolated melody leading up to Lester's appearance, which is joined by a purposeful military percussion as he enters his workplace. As the experiment begins, rhythmic tensions builds before suddenly and unexpectedly, Lester and his desk are vapourised, leaving a charred crater with dissipating charge arcing across its surface.

The game itself begins with Lester and his desk materialising beneath the surface of a deep stone pool, a stark contrast to his technically advanced (and air filled) lab. The sense of displacement is real and highlights that Lester is no longer in an environment that he controls.

Another world has very little incidental music, using the intro cinematic to provide an initial sense of tone and pacing before giving way to sound effects. The first several scenes offer a full soundscape, with forlorn wind whistling through a rocky canyon, punctuated by seismic rumbles. All of the game's sound effects feel raw and visceral, adding to the game's air of danger and urgency. As the game progresses, ambient audio becomes more sparse, relying mostly on footfalls and laser fire to fill in the space. As a result of publisher pressure from Interplay[1], the SNES port (and derivatives) feature additional in-game tension music that deviates significantly from the style established in the cinematics. In addition to being out of place, I feel that this also detracts from some of the game's sense of loneliness and isolation.

In contrast to many other games of the era (Civilization, Monkey Island 2: LeChuck's Revenge, Lemmings, Street Fighter II and Sonic The Hedgehog, for example) Another World has a comparatively understated 16 colour palette with recurring dominant blue hues that help support its atmosphere of isolation and loneliness. Its muted tones depict an not only an unforgiving and unmoving world (in which Lester with his red hair stands out), but also one that can be eerily beautiful.

The game capitalises on its low-fi presentation, using implied detail over actual detail in a way that allows the player to project and interpret things rather than have them explicitly defined. It's difficult to know how much of this is a happy coincidence due to technical limitation of the time and how much was intentional minimalism, though there are a number of moments where the game gives the player fleeting glimpses of something separated from normal gameplay (using the short city view or black monster cutscenes as an example), enough to only give a sense or impression of what's shown.


Lester is presented for the most part as a "silent protagonist", leaving his character open to player interpretation and projection. Beyond highlighting how out of place he is, the only definition the game gives Lester is when he is shown briefly emoting during his first encounter with members of the alien race (who presumably are indigenous to this planet, leaving Lester the real alien).

There's a degree of history and heritage to the indigenous people depicted within the game, who at once display aspects of technical advancement alongside cultural barbarity, with energy weapons and teleportation providing a stark counterpoint to the apparent slavery and bloodsports.

All three lines of dialogue are delivered in an alien language, two delivered by aggressive guards and one by the companion encountered by the player early in the game. This companion is shown to be amicable, caring and resourceful, and is undoubtedly the most developed character in Another World.

There's a degree of implied co-dependence that Lester and his companion share, and though Lester does not show direct response in game, the manual included with Another World contains a page from Lester's journal expressing concern.

I'm yet to see someone play through the game without feeling a sense of connection to this character, empathy which I believe speaks to the success of Lester's "silent protagonist" role.


The pacing of Another World's gameplay is structured so as to heighten the impact of the game's tension centrepieces. The placement of encounters, obstacles and save points gives the sense that flow and pacing were heavily in mind as the game evolved.

As mentioned earlier, the game relies on players using trial and error (often resulting in death) to explore possibility space and discover solutions. For example, most players' first death will occur whilst they are absorbing the shock of Lester's transition from an air filled lab to beneath the surface of a murky pool. Invariably, all first time players I have observed are quickly pulled down into the depths by a mass of tentacles reaching from below. This first death introduces the notion that this new world (and the game itself) is not a friendly one, and that Lester's immediate task is to survive.

In modern context, this death oriented learning would be considered a negative aspect. At the time of release, the popularity of titles like Dragon's Lair and Sierra's line of adventure games, which heavily featured player death, made this much more accessible. To help make death feel less negative, many of these games employed special death animations or cutscenes as a reward. In particular the death messages/puns and animations in Sierra adventure are highly celebrated. Deaths with cutscenes in Another World are short and in line with the survival horror aesthetic, showing a glimpse of tightly framed jaws or claws in a way that implies the violent outcome without directly depicting it. Several types of deaths don't feature cutscenes and tend to be more graphic and bloody, though the zoomed out perspective gives them lesser impact.

Unlike Dragon's Lair however, each death in Another World (with the exception of combat encounters and platforming obstacles) provides a learning opportunity, and as such, technically isn't an end-state. This perspective feels to be an important aspect of finding Another World enjoyable and rewarding.


Two years before Another World's release, Jordan Mechner's Prince of Persia solidified what would be known as the "cinematic platformer", a style of platformer known for relatively realistic movement and more maturely constructed storytelling...

Continued on Cheesetalks
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36 of 39 people (92%) found this review helpful
5.2 hrs on record
Posted: July 1
Well, that took me back to 1991, when I owned an Amiga 500 and an Atari joystick! Its hard to belive that was 23 years ago, and the game is still great. The graphics, animation and ambiance was ahead of its time back then, if your an old fart like me wanting to recapture your youth, or just interested in the classics then I highly recomend this if you have never played it.
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13 of 13 people (100%) found this review helpful
2.3 hrs on record
Posted: October 6
Another World has been remembered for over two decades now because of the uniquely cohesive experience and sleek vectorized visuals it offers, from a time where graphics and storytelling were often terse and stilted.

While this game is short, not much longer than two hours, those two hours have been solely designed by French artist Eric Chahi, and intimate attention has been paid to the detailed backgrounds, foregrounds and animations. Pacing and level design have been carefully decided to fit the overall theme.

This comes from an era where all this fit on two floppy disks -- this entire game had to fit in just under 3MB. So while music and sound may seem sparse, and some areas seem underpopulated or underdetailed, just realize this entire game was the same size as a modern-day high-resolution background image.

As a result of being designed around these limitations, what the game does have and does do, it does very well. Another World is a game that manages to have both atmosphere and style, in a tightly-knit package.

As for the actual gameplay, it is enjoyable -- combat is intense and quick, leading to frequent deaths but the kind of feeling that will keep you on your toes. Puzzles are sometimes unusual, I think more an indication of the era the game came from -- puzzle logic even in most story-driven games for the time (point-and-click adventure games) were often unforgiving and exacting. So while this game has some odd puzzles, its quick respawns and common checkpoints often allow you to figure out the way through quickly without too much frustration from quick successive deaths.

Overall, a surprisingly unique and strong narrative for the time, relying on virtually no written or spoken word. As for it's price point: 10 dollars is not unfair to ask, and those who have played this before might be willing to drop that much for the nostalgia factor. For most other people, 10 dollars can certainly get you a lot more than two hours of gameplay. But, as a milestone in video game history, and as an experience that still stands on its own merits, it's still worth giving it your time -- it doesn't ask for much.

P.S. Another World will likely be going on seasonal sale at 2.50USD from its current 10USD price point, as it has during the Summer 2014 Steam Sale. If you're on the fence, I'd strongly recommend picking it up during the next wave of seasonal sales.
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11 of 12 people (92%) found this review helpful
3.2 hrs on record
Posted: June 30
10/10

Played this a long time ago. The 20th Anniversary is a really good deal. I enjoyed the Bonus it brought with it and the new graphics, but the old will always top that. This game is a thriller and at times may be difficult. If you love classics and enjoy some Sci-Fi in your life, one with challenging aspects, this is the game your looking for. I enjoyed it from beginning to end. I don't have any words that could describe this game.
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10 of 12 people (83%) found this review helpful
0.4 hrs on record
Posted: October 14
Mycaruba
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10 of 14 people (71%) found this review helpful
0.2 hrs on record
Posted: September 1
I loved this game on the SNES and purchased it through excitement of seeing it on steam, remastered. Unfortunately they have removed one of the most immersive aspects to this game, the music. It made the game come alive with atmosphere, I gave it a go but just couldn't enjoy it, such a disappointment. Back to the SNES emulator.
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3 of 3 people (100%) found this review helpful
1.8 hrs on record
Posted: October 11
I remember this game on the amiga from my childhood with fond and frustrating memories.

This remake is true to the original with only subtle changes and an all new hard mode. The main character manages to get through the entire tale without saying a word which is fairly impressive given the minimal graphics and sound.

(Only watch this video if you dont mind SPOILERS!)
http://youtu.be/1XzhL_j8kx4
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5 of 7 people (71%) found this review helpful
0.6 hrs on record
Posted: August 22
Still one of my favorite games been playing it for 21 years
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2 of 2 people (100%) found this review helpful
7.2 hrs on record
Posted: September 20
Just finished playing the [slightly] remastered version of Another World. I say slightly because even though they smoothed out the blocky graphics and animations, it still holds a dear place in my heart as they kept the original art style for the time that the technology would allow. Playing this game brought back a lot of memories as I remember playing this on my brother's Sega Genesis 20 years ago! And, most annoying of all, I never beat the game back then! Time restrictions due to tv-limits and homework, coupled with the fact that there was no save option, made the game nearly impossible for a kid like me to beat. So, proudly, I am now able to say I beat the game!

Sure, it doesn't have the snazzy graphics, enthralling plot (there's no real talking throughout the whole game), or variation on gameplay that many of today's games offer, but it was a great game for its time and I can remember that thanks to this anniversary edition. What the game does very well, is pull the player into 'another world' through an immediate introduction of a science experiment gone wrong that transports the player. The characer has no personality, but the goal of trying to guide this lost soul through a strange world is enthralling enough to pull a player in, and forgive the game's lack of contemporary graphics. Infinite respawns upon death, back to the last checkpoint, make the game fun to play and explore, although the game is short. A skilled player could probably beat the game in under two hours upon their first attempt. Quickly executed button pushing requires a certain amount of skill, and some of the puzzles are fun to figure out. A few of the puzzles will most likely require help from this new-fangled contraption called the interwebs...probably a fad :P

I would recommend this game to anyone who wants to see what a great game from 20 years ago (that can still hold its own) is like!

Ratings out of 10: 1 = low, 10 = high.
Graphics: 4 (a 9 if this were remade today)
Sound: 8 (sound makes up a huge amount of the game's atmosphere, especially since there's no talking)
Story: 8 (I may be a bit biased, but I can see this as a great sci-fi novel)
Gameplay: 9 (Experimenting your way through a foreign world was a puzzle in itself)
Execution: 10 (Gotta give credit to the game for being such a well-done game for its time. Didn't really see much in the way of glitches or problems. Getting stuck on a puzzle doesn't count!)
Overall: 8 (I'd love to rate this game higher, but today's gaming landscape is so far advanced compared to 20 years ago. Many indie developers could probably make a game similiar to this if they put their hearts into it.)
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2 of 2 people (100%) found this review helpful
1.6 hrs on record
Posted: September 16
One of the best games ever made, now re-made (more reworked :)
They say memories are priceless, but apparently they are only $9.99
If you palyed this long ago, it's still great. If you didn't, then you might not?

The game conveys it's story without words, and you learn by dying ALOT.
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