A family friendly, hand-animated, puzzle-filled adventure game with an all-star cast, including Elijah Wood, Jack Black and Masasa Moyo. Funded by a record breaking crowdfunding campaign and designed by industry legend Tim Schafer, Broken Age is a timeless coming-of-age story.
User reviews:
Overall:
Very Positive (5,070 reviews) - 83% of the 5,070 user reviews for this game are positive.
Release Date: Jan 28, 2014

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Packages that include this game

Buy Broken Age + Soundtrack

Includes 2 items: Broken Age, Broken Age - Soundtrack

Buy Double Fine Bundle 2015

Includes 16 items: Broken Age, Broken Age - Soundtrack, Brutal Legend, Brutal Legend Soundtrack, Costume Quest, Grim Fandango Remastered, Grim Fandango Remastered - Soundtrack, Hack 'n' Slash, Iron Brigade, MASSIVE CHALICE, MASSIVE CHALICE Soundtrack, Psychonauts, Psychonauts Original Score, Psychonauts Original Soundtrack, Spacebase DF-9, Stacking

Buy Broken Age + Soundtrack + Double Fine Adventure Documentary

Includes 3 items: Broken Age, Broken Age Soundtrack, Double Fine Adventure! Complete Series

Downloadable Content For This Game

 

Reviews

“Act 1 of Broken Age is a gorgeous, impeccably written adventure that simultaneously tugs at my nostalgic core, while ushering in a new era for the point-and-click genre.”
9.5 – IGN

“...delightful, beautiful, utterly charming and you really should play it right this second.”
9 – Polygon

“I haven’t felt this surge of nostalgia and excitement about a game in a long time, and I truly think Broken Age will be looked back fondly as one of the greats.”
9.5 – Destructoid

About This Game

Broken Age is a family friendly, hand-animated, puzzle-filled adventure game with an all-star cast, including Elijah Wood, Jack Black and Masasa Moyo. Funded by a record breaking crowdfunding campaign and designed by industry legend Tim Schafer, Broken Age is a timeless coming-of-age story of barfing trees and talking spoons.

Vella Tartine and Shay Volta are two teenagers in strangely similar situations, but radically different worlds. The player can freely switch between their stories, helping them take control of their own lives, and dealing with the unexpected adventures that follow.

Starring:

Elijah Wood as Shay
Masasa Moyo as Vella
Jack Black as Harm'ny Lightbeard
Jennifer Hale as Mom
Wil Wheaton as Curtis
Pendleton Ward as Gus

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
SteamOS + Linux
    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows XP Service Pack 3
    • Processor: 1.7 GHz Dual Core
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 260, ATI Radeon 4870 HD, Intel HD 3000, or equivalent card with at least 512 MB VRAM
    • DirectX: Version 9.0
    • Storage: 2500 MB available space
    • Sound Card: DirectX Compatible Sound Card
    • Additional Notes: Must have OpenGL 3 with GLSL version 1.3
    Recommended:
    • OS: Windows 7
    • Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo at 2.2 GHz, AMD Athlon 64 2.2Ghz
    • Memory: 3 GB RAM
    • Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460, AMD Radeon HD 6850
    • DirectX: Version 11
    • Storage: 2500 MB available space
    • Sound Card: DirectX Compatible Sound Card
    • Additional Notes: Must have OpenGL 3 with GLSL version 1.3. Some users may need to disable Steam overlay.
    Minimum:
    • OS: Snow Leopard 10.6.8 or later
    • Processor: Intel Core Duo
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: ATI Radeon HD 4850, NVIDIA GeForce GT 120, Intel HD 3000, or equivalent card with at least 512 MB VRAM
    • Storage: 2500 MB available space
    • Additional Notes: Must have OpenGL 3 with GLSL version 1.3
    Recommended:
    • OS: Lion 10.7.X
    • Processor: Intel Core i series processor
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: AMD Radeon HD 6770, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460
    • Storage: 2500 MB available space
    • Sound Card: Compatible Sound Card
    • Additional Notes: Must have OpenGL 3 with GLSL version 1.3. Some users may need to disable Steam overlay.
    Minimum:
    • OS: Ubuntu 12.04 LTS
    • Processor: 1.7 GHz Dual Core
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 260, ATI Radeon 4870 HD, Intel HD 4000, or equivalent card with at least 512 MB VRAM
    • Storage: 2500 MB available space
    • Additional Notes: Must have OpenGL 3 with GLSL version 1.3
    Recommended:
    • OS: Ubuntu 12.04 LTS or higher
    • Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo at 2.2 GHz, AMD Athlon 64 2.2Ghz
    • Memory: 3 GB RAM
    • Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460, AMD Radeon HD 6850
    • Storage: 2500 MB available space
    • Sound Card: Compatible Sound Card
    • Additional Notes: Must have OpenGL 3 with GLSL version 1.3. Some users may need to disable Steam overlay.
Helpful customer reviews
33 of 49 people (67%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
16.7 hrs on record
Posted: February 13
Broken Age is a successfully kickstarted adventure game made by Double Fine (Psychonauts, Costume Quest, Brütal Legend) where the main thing is the new look on the environment where the story plays. Broken Age tries to blend fantasy and sci-fi into one big weird world with two protagonists. As in many other adventure games (Gemini Rue goes up to my mind at the moment), you can switch between protagonists anytime.

In the world from fantasy theme view, you play as Vella, young baker girl who is just supposed to be sacrificed towards big flying Lovecraftian monster because of the tradition that promises villages not being destroyed for offering in form of young ladies. All people think of it as honor to be sacrificed, but Vella would rather pay the iron price.

From futuristic theme view, you play as Shay, a boy who is living in a spaceship with his "Mom" and "Dad". Although he has a carefree life there, he gets sullen because of the repeating rutine of eating, sleeping and completing missions that should make him feel like a hero. But... even he already realised there's something not right there.

You may now ask how does such different storylines can be put together in one game but that doesn't deserve a proper answer - just put up with the fact that it's possible and it's believable. That applies fully to the Act I (at the early access phase of the game, only the first act was available, so the game got a lot of praise).

The second act changed opinion of many people, myself included. There are many plotholes and nonsense parts which could be overlooked if there wasn't the ending that, story-wise, feels rushed. Oh my, isn't that Double Fine's tradition? I remember similar impression from Brütal Legend!

Difficulty of the game varies on, surprisingly, acts. The first act is pretty easy, you will stay in flow, happily continuing through the story. The second act rises with difficulty that can get you stuck at some moments, but I think it's still in bearable for most players. The ending is something frustrating and hard, even though it plays on lesser amount of rooms.

But everything isn't worth criticizing, the game doesn't deserve it. In both acts, characters have a good sense of humour, there are many nice gags and puns. It's also worth mentioning there's more references pointed towards specific groups of people and communities than towards games. Finally a game that tries to be funny without arrow in the knee! (Even though it's a hyperbole, I still think those gaming references are overused in games that are trying to be funny.)

Visual style perfectly expresses the unique world of Broken Age and I don't think there's anything to reproach, if you don't mind more room recyclation as the story is revolving just in few specific places. What almost could not be better is the voice acting that's really great! (It would be weird if it wasn't, as there are professional actors.)

Conclusion:
Broken Age is a disappointment for everybody who went with the hype that started with its Kickstarter campaign, because it ended up as a mediocre adventure made by well-known studio. If the game held the difficulty through all acts, and was properly finished without much nonsense around, it would be definitely great. But it isn't, it's just another point and click adventure game. Still even through the negative aspects I mentioned, I think it's worth buying on sale.


For more reviews, join Samurai Vader's Point of View group and follow my curator page, I'm always happy to see feedback about my reviews.
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19 of 24 people (79%) found this review helpful
11.5 hrs on record
Posted: February 28
The disapointing part is that it didn't feel like the game really ended if anything it felt like we're still missing an entire third act.
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68 of 114 people (60%) found this review helpful
16.6 hrs on record
Posted: November 18, 2015
Broken Age is a beautifully crafted experience that is unfortunately somewhat marred by the dramatic increase in puzzle difficulty in the second part of the game which comes too suddenly and will therefore likely take players off guard.

The game follows two separate coming-of-age stories, one centred on the boy Shay and the other on the girl Vella – the two live in different worlds but find out that their lives are intertwined in a surprising way.

Broken Age was clearly crafted with a lot of love and care, and the production quality is outstanding. The writing is great, the voice acting is exemplary and the art is simply gorgeous. The game looks hand-painted and it is clear that a lot of effort went into making it look beautiful and feel unique. The game's world is not all that big, but every location is different and new, and there are many interesting characters. One of the protagonists, Shay, is voiced by Elijah Wood, who is apparently a big fan of adventure games and asked if he could be involved in the project. Some other famous names are in the game as well: Jack Black does a great job voicing the cult leader H'rmony, Will Wheaton appears as a lumberjack afraid of trees, while the amazing Jennifer Hale (voice of FemShep in Mass Effect) is present as the ship's Mom computer.

The writing might be my favourite part of the game, the dialogue is really well written and frequently contains a lot of humour, like the lines Vella delivers to make a tree vomit, practically anything involving Shay's yarn pals, or the responses from Shay's talking utensils.

It is a really great game in many aspects.

However, Broken Age also has one (pretty big) problem, which players who played the game upon completion, as opposed to playing Act 1 first and then Act 2 a year later, might have felt more acutely: the puzzles in the second part of the game are much more complex and difficult to figure out. What started as very much a casual experience – the puzzles in the first half of the game are most of the time quite simple to figure out – suddenly turns into something much more challenging and different from what came before.

Broken Age was originally released in two parts, with over a year between the release of the first part and the release of the complete game. In the documentary about the making of the game,* it is clear that the developers felt that they should make the puzzles in Act 2 more difficult because players would have learned from the puzzles in Act 1 and would expect a greater challenge in Act 2. However, playing through the game as a whole, the sudden spike in difficulty halfway through feels like it came out of nowhere and takes the player by surprise. It is something that makes the experience feel disjointed, since the entire first half of the game sets the player up for a specific kind of experience which is then pretty radically changed.

The puzzles in the second half are not impossible; some of them might try the player's patience but for the most part they are well thought out. However, they will require the player to rethink how they approach them halfway through the game and that switch might be somewhat jarring for some, or even annoying if a casual experience was one of the things that drew them to the game. On the other hand, some players will probably welcome the more challenging puzzles of the second part, feeling that it is the puzzle experience they were looking for.



*The documentary is called Double Fine Adventure and is available in its entirety on Double Fine's YouTube page. It consists of 20 episodes and follows the entire development cycle of the game, from the Kickstarter in 2012 to the game's completion in 2015. If you are even remotely interested in how games are developed, I strongly urge you to watch the documentary because it is incredibly insightful.
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24 of 38 people (63%) found this review helpful
50.6 hrs on record
Posted: January 1
I saw so many negative reviews on this game, but I still gave it a chance because it looks beautiful and the voice cast is amazing! I have to say, this is one of my favorite games of all time. It is simple, but the art is stunningly beautiful and I adore the world, the characters, and the crazy storyline. I wish I could forget it all and play it through the first time again. Yes, the second act is a challenge and sometimes I had to look up outside help, but most of it I figured out myself with no outside help. I love this game and I won't be forgetting it any time soon.
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19 of 30 people (63%) found this review helpful
9.3 hrs on record
Posted: December 9, 2015
Bought on a whim during the most recent sale. Enjoyed every minute of it. Harkened back to the old adventure games I cut my teeth on. The art is beautiful, they picked wonderful people for their voice actors, the puzzles are challanging but not impossible and make you feel like a smarty pants when you finally figure them out. All in all, a great purchase.
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