Starseed Pilgrim is a game about tending a symphonic garden, exploring space, and embracing fate. You are a gardener, tending to empty noise and empty space to fill them both with colour. You are a refugee, building your own world away from the spreading darkness.
User reviews: Mixed (293 reviews)
Release Date: Apr 16, 2013

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Reviews

"Advice for playing Starseed Pilgrim: As long as you still have questions, continue."
Jonathan Blow

"Unfortunately, you cannot talk about Starseed Pilgrim, because that would spoil it for so many others. There’s unwritten rules at play. But it’s so open to discussion between two or more journeyers who find themselves at similar junctions."
Indie Statik

"It’s OK to feel lost, it seems to suggest, because it’s the only way to feel the intoxicating effect of discovery. I became so angry with Starseed Pilgrim because it purposely allows you, encourages you even, to feel lost.
Game Church

About This Game

Starseed Pilgrim is a game about tending a symphonic garden, exploring space, and embracing fate.

You are a gardener, tending to empty noise and empty space to fill them both with colour.
You are a refugee, building your own world away from the spreading darkness.
You are an explorer, discovering new places, new rules, and new fascinations.

The Universe Is Bigger Than You Know.

System Requirements

PC
Mac

    Minimum:

    • Memory:512 MB RAM
    • Hard Drive:30 MB HD space

    Recommended:

    • Memory:1 GB RAM

    Minimum:

    • Memory:512 MB RAM
    • Hard Drive:60 MB HD space

    Recommended:

    • Memory:1 GB RAM
Helpful customer reviews
35 of 49 people (71%) found this review helpful
0.6 hrs on record
Starseed Pilgrim is the kind of game where I can't give it a negative review, because it means I don't, "get it," and at the same time, I can't give it a positive review, because its author(s) were so pre-occupied tripping over itself in attempts to be thought-provoking, they seem to have forgotten to include... content. There's symbolism and artistic metaphor, but they're so vague and caved-in under so much repeatition that few, if any, players can actually give them even a minimal identity. There's straightforward gameplay with puzzles to be solved and rewards to be had, but the biggest puzzle is solved the instant the player has planted a seed of each color for the first time and collected a key. The rewards for success are nebulous and consist mostly of being faced with the same puzzle again, while the penalty for failure is also being faced with the same puzzle again. It's essentially entertainment for art-game snobs, who want a reason to laugh at the riff-raff that don't appreciate it the "right" way, and for defeatists who are only comfortable playing in a world where all their actions are doomed to begin with. Certainly, people other than the above mentioned types can enjoy Starseed Pilgrim, but the intentional kind of enjoyment this game produces isn't about trial and error puzzle-play (like House of Dead Ninjas), exploration of a metaphor-strewn environment (like The Path), or even some combination of the two (such as Limbo). Basically, this goes into the same category as "Vinnie Vole's Existentialist Nightmare."
Posted: June 25
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13 of 17 people (76%) found this review helpful
6.0 hrs on record
Exploration, discovery, mystery, wonder, suprise. Just some of the brand of adjectives that seemingly every review of this game coos. And true enough, the game does have that. For the first couple of hours I was glued to the screen while I solved the metapuzzle that is Starseed Pilgrim. The puzzle is to understand the game's mechanics, and wonderful and clever mechanics they are. The problem: the game does nothing afterwards. In the solving of the mechanics, you've already seen all of what the game has to offer. Those nouns above comprise about 10% of your playtime, The rest: repetition. With its involving atmosphere and great use of sound, as well as said mechanics, I was expecting Starseed Pilgrim to evolve into a masterpiece. What a shame.
Posted: July 9
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6 of 7 people (86%) found this review helpful
1.2 hrs on record
Boring and pointlessly obfuscated. Less a game and more a, er, gardening experience?
Posted: July 11
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5 of 7 people (71%) found this review helpful
17.2 hrs on record
Starseed Pilgrim is a mojito on the beach of the end of the universe
Posted: June 19
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3 of 4 people (75%) found this review helpful
2.5 hrs on record
It's a bizarre game that is very obtuse and gives little in terms of what it whats you to do. Maybe for some people, but not me.
Posted: September 22
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99 of 113 people (88%) found this review helpful
9.3 hrs on record
There seem to be a lot of pretentious reviews for this game on the internet, which really put me off. Despite my criticisms, the dev gave me a copy through twitter. Stripped of the pretty words others seem to lavish on it, it’s basically a platformy puzzler you play at your own pace which you’ll either hate, grow bored of quickly, or love. There is nothing innately pretentious about the game itself which makes me wonder why indie game reviewers try so hard.

In Starseed Pilgrim, you collect “seeds” to build block formations to explore your central hub and unlock other pilgrims. To collect seeds, you must venture into a place where the darkness of space is actively devouring everything. The darkness of space, if you jump into it, inverts the playing field, making those solid blocks into empty space and vice versa. You want to collect seeds and keys in order to get back home and use them. You can’t grow anything in the darkness of space so thought must be invested beforehand.

The game largely leaves you to your own devices, so you’re free to explore whatever you can reach. Different coloured seeds grow into different shapes and sometimes do special things, like provide seeds in the darkness of space or allow you to jump higher. Certain levels have rules. It’s up to you to figure out what does what but nothing is so obtuse that it’s impossible.

If you find peace in repetition and enjoy setting your own goals, I’d say buy this game, otherwise you won’t get much out of it. And on the front of accessibility, the game has colour blind mode on by default and supports scaling. I was appreciative of both.
Posted: November 30, 2013
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