Gather your party and get ready for a new, back-to-the-roots RPG adventure! Discuss your decisions with companions; fight foes in turn-based combat; explore an open world and interact with everything and everyone you see. Join up with a friend to play online in co-op and make your own adventures with the powerful RPG toolkit.
User reviews: Very Positive (8,778 reviews)
Release Date: Jun 30, 2014

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Buy Divinity Original Sin

Buy Divinity Original Sin Digital Collectors edition

Includes two copies of Divinity: Original Sin, one Source Hunter DLC pack, plus one Beyond Divinity and one Divine Divinity. Send your second Divinity Original Sin copy to a friend!

Buy Divinity Original Sin - Source Hunter DLC pack

Unlocks Divinity Original Sin: The Golden Grail DLC, Divinity Original Sin: Zandalor's Trunks DLC, Divinity: Original Sin Design Documents and Art Pack, and Soundtrack. (DLC will only be made available on release.)

 

Recommended By Curators

"A little obtuse in places, but otherwise this is the best new RPG in years. Demands your time and your brain, but it's worth it."
Read the full review here.

Recent updates View all (41)

October 30, 2014

Update Version 1.0.219

Hi everyone,

Today's patch contains over 150 improvements and more are coming.

FYI, we'll soon be organizing a Larian Devline where you can talk directly to our developers and suggest further improvements. You'll also be able to tell us what you'd like to see in our future RPGs.

Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter to keep up to date on when the first Larian Devline will be hosted.

You can read the full changelog on our forum:
Patch v1.0.219 Changelog

55 comments Read more

September 29, 2014

Minor Update for 1.0.177

Hello,

If you see any update flash by today, we fixed two missing dialogs for French, Russian and German. We also removed "zero width space" characters from all text in the game because our font does not support it and would show a square.

Cheers!

David
Larian Studios

22 comments Read more

Reviews

“Hands down the best classic-style RPG in years”
9/10 – Eurogamer

“An incredible title that provides many hours of entertainment”
9/10 – Game Informer

“Outstanding tactical combat and engaging quests make Divinity: Original Sin one of the most rewarding RPGs in years.”
9/10 – IGN

About This Game

Gather your party and get ready for a new, back-to-the-roots RPG adventure! Discuss your decisions with companions; fight foes in turn-based combat; explore an open world and interact with everything and everyone you see. Join up with a friend to play online in co-op and make your own adventures with the powerful RPG toolkit.

In Divinity: Original Sin you take on the role of a young Source Hunter: your job is to rid the world of those who use the foulest of magics. When you embark on what should have been a routine murder investigation, you suddenly find yourself in the middle of a plot that will rattle the very fabric of time.

Divinity: Original Sin is a game that gives you a lot of freedom and plenty of gameplay mechanics to use or abuse. The game's epic story may drive you toward your ultimate end-goal, but how you get there is entirely up to you.

Or up to you and a friend, because Divinity: Original Sin can be played completely cooperatively, and features both online and local drop-in/drop-out multiplayer. Great adventures become even greater when shared with a trusted comrade-in-arms!

Key Features

  • Become part of a reactive, living and vast open world. Explore many different environments, fight all kinds of fantastical creatures and discover tons of desirable items.
  • Experience gripping party- and turn-based combat. Manipulate the environment and use skill & spell combos to overcome your many foes: Use magic to make it rain on your enemies, then cast a lightning spell to fry them to a crisp. Experiment with different skill combinations to ruin the day for enemies and townspeople alike.
  • Play with a friend in co-op multiplayer. Make decisions together (or disagree entirely), as your interactions and relationship with your partner influence the game.
  • Unravel a deep and epic story, set in the early days of the Divinity universe. No prior experience with other Divinity games is necessary, however. The game takes place well before its predecessors, Divine Divinity and Divinity II: The Dragon Knight Saga, but will still feel familiar to fans.
  • Classless character creation lets you design the character of your choice. Endless item interaction and combinations take exploration and experimentation to another level of freedom.
  • Create your own adventures and share them online. With Original Sin comes the powerful toolset used by the game's designers. Yours are endless new stories to make and share with other players!

Digital Collector's Edition

The Digital Collector's Edition contains:


  • 2 copies of Divinity: Original Sin: one for you and pass on the second key to a friend
  • Award-winning Divine Divinity and Beyond Divinity
  • The Golden Grail DLC: an in-game item that allows you to colour your items in gold and sell them for more.
  • Zandalor's Trunks DLC: enjoy a unique in-game undergarment as rare as it is opinionated.
  • Design Documents
  • Art Pack
  • Soundtrack


System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows XP SP3 or higher
    • Processor: Intel Core2 Duo E6600 or equivalent
    • Memory: 2048 MB RAM
    • Graphics: HD Intel Graphics 4000 or NVIDIA® GeForce® 8800 GT (512 MB) or ATI™ Radeon™ HD 4850 or equivalent
    • DirectX: Version 9.0c
    • Hard Drive: 10 GB available space
    • Sound Card: DirectX9c compliant
    Recommended:
    • OS: Windows 7 SP1 or Windows 8.1
    • Processor: Intel i5 2400 or higher
    • Memory: 4096 MB RAM
    • Graphics: NVIDIA® GeForce® GTX 550 ti 1GB ram or or ATI™ Radeon™ HD 6XXX or higher
    • DirectX: Version 9.0c
    • Hard Drive: 10 GB available space
    • Sound Card: DirectX9c compliant
    Minimum:
    • OS: OS X 10.8.5
    • Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Intel HD Graphics 3000/4000
    • Hard Drive: 10 GB available space
    • Additional Notes: HD3000 & HD4000 benefit from 8Gb of memory
    Recommended:
    • OS: OS X 10.9.3
    • Processor: Intel i5 or higher
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Intel Iris (Iris Pro) or ATI™ Radeon™ HD 6XXX or higher or NVidia 6xx series or higher
    • Hard Drive: 10 GB available space
    • Additional Notes: HFS+ filesystem with case-sensitivity is not yet supported
Helpful customer reviews
451 of 484 people (93%) found this review helpful
36.2 hrs on record
Posted: November 1, 2014
In a gaming world full of handholding, uninspired battle systems, and just sheer crap, Divinity is a shining diamond in the rough.

Graphics - 9/10:
Loot-based, dungeon-crawling RPGs are never known for their graphics so I will rate it on a level equivalent to similar games like Torchlight 2 and Diablo 3. I'm going to put this simply - Divinity is ****ing gorgeous. The art direction is spot on, the colors are bright and bring the world to life, and the character designs are great too. You won't feel like you're trudging through the same damn dungeon or cave for the 50th time in a row. Everywhere feels unique. You'll traverse vast forests of green, blistering cold mountain tops, firey fields of skeletons and so much more. It's a well-imagined world that makes the game worth of a 9/10 score in the graphics department.

Sound - 8/10:
So don't expect full voice overs or anything like that. There will be spoken dialogue from time to time- particularly from your main characters, but for the most part NPCs' dialogue is all written (but very well written mind you). So why am I giving it an 8 for sound? Because the music is some of the best I've heard in a video game...EVER!

Story - 8/10:
You're a Source Hunter (yeah I know...just another cliche name for a hero that's received his title and known for aboloshing evil magic and foes from the land). But don't let that make you overlook what's an otherwise pretty good story as far as loot-based RPGs go. You start out by coming to town to solve a murder. I think this mystery-style beginning really helps drive the games gameplay. Divinity: OS expects you to listen to NPCs, pick up on subtle hints found in text and side character dialogue, and really just discover, discover, discover to unravel the story and new missions.

It's worth noting that some may as a result get really frustrated by this lack of handholding; I on the other hand think it's great and really helps add to the game's charm.

Gameplay - 11/10:
This is where the game shines. All aspects of this game are fun. As stated earlier, the clue-finding and unravelling of the story are fun. You'll be posed with hints, clues, and puzzles which will lead to scratching your head, yet always persistant on unlocking the next series of quests.

Beyond this, the interactions amongst your party's characters and NPCs is fun. Divinity includes a rock-paper-scissors style mini-game to determine the outcome of conversations. I know it sounds weird, but it's actually really fun. If an NPC is not particularly interested in giving up information to you, then you can try to beat him at a game of RPS.

Where this game truly shines though is in the battle system. Everything is action point and turn-based driven. Depending on speed and initiative, an order to character turns will be determined at the beginning of the fight (similar to FFX). Character's can obviously use special skills and spells to influence their turn postions. You also have action points for each turn which again is stat-driven based on a characters constitution among other things. Obviously different skills and spells take different amount of points to cast depending on their power and your overall skill level.

So far I'm sure this sounds like a pretty standard turn-based battle system. BUT WAIT - THERE's MORE. Truly the best part about Divinity is the unique use of elemental environments. Characters can cast spells, blow up barrles, and manipulate the environment in all sorts of ways to overcome foes.

Group of enemies standing in a puddle of water? Shoot an electric bolt to make them all stunned for 3 turns. No puddle of water? No problem- cast a rain spell first across the battlefield to create your own puddles then shock it.

Of course that's a simplistic approach that you'll learn how to do in the first 10 minutes of the game. I won't mention the other awesome environmental elements you can manipulate 'cause I think Divinity is one of those games where part or if its spirit is the unknown. There's A LOT to learn in this game. There is, for instance, both crafting and blacksmithing skills in the game, that is so deep and complex, that after 40 hours of playing, I haven't even begun to scratch the surface yet.

Overall 10/10: It's one of the best RPGs I've ever played - hands down. You're really not doing yourself any favors by passing on this game. In fact, I'd call you a fool if you did. This game should be played by every and any person that considers themselves a gamer.
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454 of 519 people (87%) found this review helpful
6 people found this review funny
53.5 hrs on record
Posted: October 26, 2014
-Lacked the money to buy a minor heal spell for my knight.
-Infurated, began to murder every npc in town
-Their blood now serves as a healing source for my leeching talent

11/10

-----
Edit (since people actually took the time to read this)

I play this game along with my girlfriend in co-op mode. While i wouldn't consider myself new to this type of games, i was soon reminded of how hard RPGs can be.

For people that are new to the genre, this game can prove to be quite frightening, especially at the beginning, even in normal difficulty. The lack of direction given, or... the freedom of choice you have... makes the game quite confusing at first, which is why its highly recommended to always read the dialogue carefully. The game even gives you the option to read again the whole conversation through the conversation log tab.

Co-op mode adds to the fun of the game. The fact that you can play the entire game along with a friend makes it the more enjoyable to go through. While people can argue that co-op can make any game look better, Divinity: Original Sin, gives a further meaning to play with your friend, having the NPCs actually acknowledging your companion and not just simply having it there for the sake of having someone around. You can get to talk with your allies at any time, getting to know them more. At certain times, depending on your actions, you will even get short interactions with whoever is in your party that can boost certain traits based on the answer given. There is a meaning for your friend to be there, is not like other games where your co-op companion is just another clone of yourself.

The gameplay is fun. Turn-base combat system based on AP (Action points) is self explanatory, the more AP's you have, the more actions you can make in your turn. Each character has its own APs that are boosted by their attributes and gear.

You are given several classes to pick from though you are not prohibit from learning other classes abiilties. For example, my knight can use water-based skills which are the ones that can grant healing spells along with other water/ice abilities. As for character customization, its not really deep, in fact, i believe it might be one weak point of the game.

Overall, the game is incredibly addicting and fun. While the early levels might discourage newcomers, this game sure is one big reminder that classic-style RPGs are not dead and can show up at any time to surprise us and remind just how fun and frustrating they used to be. I was lucky enough to encounter no bugs so far, which is something i am grateful for seeing how i read some bugs around that can make progress quite more painful than what it should.

I would hate myself if i had to give a real numeric value to the game, so i will say this: "If you are curious about the game, buy it, you will simply not regret it"

One last thing, save often. F5 will be one of your strongest allies. (Not kidding, really, save often)
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1,126 of 1,684 people (67%) found this review helpful
8 people found this review funny
86.7 hrs on record
Posted: September 7, 2014
I spent several dozen hours in this game, so why do I, insanely enough, do not recommend it?
First of, I gave up on it. Haven't finished it and cannot bring myself to try. It's not that it's too hard, the game is pleasantly challenging but not inherenty difficult.
What's the problem is 2/3 of that time had nothing to do with moving ahead in the game, or even doing side things that are fun. Not even on getting to understand the game. Rather just dicking about, trying to figure out what the developers had in mind.

It's a real shame, because for the first dozen hours, everthing is perfect. It's what everyone who desire a Baldur's Gate 3 wanted. Unfortunately, the developers tripped it up on a very fundamental level.

One, they showed all their cards at the very beggining. After the first 10 hours, I've already seen everything the game had to offer, the other 70 or so I just levelled up. Sure there's some plot or something like that, but past maybe 20 hours it doesn't hold any real mystery either. After I decided that I don't feel like playing anymore, I checked just in case what was still ahead and turns out I was right - if the game went straight to the final confrontation, I would have missed almost nothing.

Secondly, Larian wanted to make a game that doesn't lead you by the hand, but rather forces you to think and analyze in an open environment. It went sour at the part where the solutions to the problems are hardly logical. Or rather, you as the player can logically deduce them, but the game won't let you follow up on that. That is because some of them still depend on a single item (hidden in an incospicious or even purposefully obscure place) fireing the script or putting a pointer on the map (that you would not be able to pinpoint in any other concievable way). The reason why this killed the game for me is because those are the key points of the game that progress the story. And because of the open world, otherwise plentiful dialogue solutions and criminal lack of hints, it's easy to think something will present itself at some point, you just need to explore more. What it turns out to be is just one missed mundane container/hidden mound/hidden trapdoor that held the crucial piece.

To give a good example, in the very first part of the game, just a few hours in, you need to find a villan's hideout. It's crucial because it's a story moment, it ends the first main story quest. I already figured that out at the time, without having to refer to walkthroughs. The game hinted as much. I had a spell that would reveal it, I just didn't know where it was.
Thinking it might be an overarching storyline, that someone somewhere along the line would give me an actual hint, I merrily went through more than half the game. It's open world, there was no clue whatsoever that I was NOT supposed to do that. Sure, some things didn't make as much sense, like new names being dropped and old one never mentioned again for no good reason, but it all just added to the mystery.
At some point later in the game, I randomly got an amulet that would lower a force field on an area that (which I know now, but didn't know at the time) is suppose to follow up right after the villian lair. I went to lower the force field and that's where things got funny. When I entered a conversation with a character found there, another character chimed in. The problem is, I broke the game sequence. The character that chimed in wasn't actually there. He wasn't there, because I didn't visit the villain lair. At that point I sensed something is wrong and looked online. Turns out I could have completed the quest from the get-go, I simply missed one inconspucious shelf that had a journal. Up to that point, it's characters pointing you to important places in corversation. I didn't even imagine that the designers would step down to something as trivial as a map pointer, something that went against everything they tried to establish until then. Nevertheless, the journal put a pointer on the map. Entering the lair fired scripts, fireing the scripts put the characters in their correct places, finishing the quest. No overarching, no subtle clues, just bad design.

The problem is, there are multiple exaples of that. Or of the game not even giving journal with a point but leaving you to stumble around. Multible times I rustled around just digging up every mound and looking through every container, taught by the above example. And that's the un-fun 2/3 of gameplay I talked about. Exploration is fun when there's interesting new things to discover. Here it's akin to pixel hunting because otherwise the game doesn't progress. I just had to find out if it was just me being stupid or the game having a weaker moment. Turns out that from that point on, that was the whole game. Almost everyone had this problem, the only difference was some defending it as "hardcore RPG gameplay".

And that's Divinity: OS past the first dozen hours of gameplay - pixel hunting to level up to fend of monsters while pixelhunting some more, hoping to god you didn't just waste a whole afternoon because you missed something vital ten hours ago. And there will be wasted afternoons.

And that's why I cannot reccomend it with a clear conscience.

EDIT:
I love how people have a fit and need to call me "kid" as if it was baby's first RPG, yet have trouble telling the difference between "can't be ♥♥♥♥♥ to read dialogue, wants hand held" and "did read, but the design is bad enough to be unhelpful at best, completely misleading at worst".

So I'll make a TL;DR version for all you attention deficit "oldschool" tryglodites.

I think this game sucks because it PROMISED not to hold my hand, and then went ahead and DID ANYWAY.

I got stuck because I was running around trying to interrogate everyone to get directions. By, you know, READING. I expected that because I thought it was the intended design. So I went on thinking that and the GAME BROKE. Not only out of sequence, but actual code. NPC in cutscenes didn't just talk about stuff that hasn't happened, they DIDN'T APPEAR IN THE CUT SCENE. Just their voice.

What it turns out, I missed an item that gives me a MAP POINTER. The quintessential hand-holding cliche.

The game broke becuase it tried to hold my hand and I didn't let it.

Capisce?

I hope this is written simply enough for you to be able to comprehend it.
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77 of 94 people (82%) found this review helpful
141.4 hrs on record
Posted: October 3, 2014
The Golden Age of the RPG

There are so many outstanding titles out there at the moment, Wasteland 2 and Shadowrun: Dragonfall DC are out, there are new Witcher and Dragon Age titles on the horizon.
It's a good time to be an RPG fan, but where does Divinity Original Sin fit into this hall of RPG fame?
Let's fire it up, build a character or two and find out!


A game with a lot of character

For a crunchy RPG the character creation doesn't feel as daunting as you might expect.
It's certainly not as initially intimidating as the also excellent Wasteland 2's character creation screen, that's not to say that character creation here is shallow, far from it.

You'll get to create two characters from the start (unless you pick the "lone wolf trait" which will give you some extra perks at the expense of your customised travelling companion.)

Experienced RPG'ers should be right at home here, pick a character class as your starting point, Knight, Wizard, Ranger etc, then tweak your attributes, skills and spells until you've got your perfect novice source hunter, ready to go out into the world and hunt some serious source!


Serious Sauce

A great power called the source exists in the world of Rivellon, a power once wielded for good but no longer.
The Wheel of Time turned and a great darkness invaded the land leaving the source forever tainted, its users driven to madness and destruction. Now only a brave few stand between Rivellon and this dark power which threatens to destroy it.
That's where you come in.


Murder She Wrote

In Divinity original sin you take on the mantle of a novice source hunter (well two novice source hunters, but who's counting).
You've been tasked with investigating the murder of a councillor in the town of Cyseal, It's suspected the source was involved and now, like a sword and magic wielding Jessica Fletcher, It's time to figure out "who dunnit"


There's your trouble!

As the game opens, you'll find yourself being unceremoniously dropped off on the sunny shores of Cyseal.
It seems a murder isn't the only problem the town is facing. The undead are at the walls and the Orcs are attacking from the coast.
Cyseal is a town with more troubles than you could shake a level 10 elemental staff at.


You Go First!

The game doesn't pull any punches, even before you make it into the town of Cyseal proper, you'll have your first tactical encounter which introduces you to the turn based combat mechanics.

Action points are the order of the day here, each character in your group (up to a maximum of four at any one time) will have a specific number of action points dependent on their stats and equipment. You'll spend these points moving, hacking, slashing and casting your way through these turn based encounters.

Combat in D:OS is a meaty and very satisfying experience, but it's not just about sorcery and swordplay, your surroundings can play a huge part in these battles too.


An Inconvenient Truth

Environmental destruction is par for the course here, and at first, you will probably do as much damage to your own group as you do to the enemy via environmental effects, that is, until you've figured a few things out.

Is the floor covered in oil? then you might want to be careful of stray sparks, a misguided fireball could send the whole lot up in flames, if you happen to be standing in the oil yourself, don't expect the environment to be forgiving, you'll burn along with all the rest.

The game can be punishing at times but you'll learn to use the environment to your advantage as you progress and after a short tutorial battle and dungeon crawl, you'll progress into the town of Cyseal.

It's here that the hunt begins.


The Great Hunt

When you make it into the town, you'll be greeted by a wealth of varied and interesting NPC's. A whistle stop tour of the dock front will start to open up various side quests quicker than you can say "That ships on fire!" and "Do I look like a recruitment agency?"

Don't worry, the in game journal does an excellent job of keeping the ever-growing quest details in order, a feature which I've found invaluable as a memory aid following those frequent occasions where the real world dares to interfere with my investigations.


Eye of the Beholder

The graphics do a fine job of enhancing the atmosphere of the game, from dark oppressive dungeons and gloomy rain soaked woodland to bright sunny beaches and the vibrant town of Cyseal itself, everything on screen adds something to the isometric glory.


Ear of the... Earholder

Whilst some NPC's are voiced, most are not. However, there are enough lines of dialogue scattered around to give the game flavour, most of which are so full of character and voiced with such vigour you can't help but smile.

Lines like "I wouldn't let an orc within 500 yards of my loving nature" and "No one has as many friends as the man with many cheeses!" are great examples of the wonderfully written and often funny dialogue that awaits you here.


Schizophrenic Encouragement

The writing is sharp and witty and the interaction between your characters can be hilarious, you can even get into arguments with yourself!
A good example of this happened to me early on in my play through when I wanted to dig up a body to follow a lead in my investigation.
I was just about to start wielding my trusty shovel when my comrade in arms objected.

In situations like this, you can find yourself choosing the dialogue options for both sides of the argument.

I couldn't help but get on my high horse about the sanctity of the grave and disturbing the dead with my second character, whilst my first glared on, shovel in hand quipping about short sighted sensitivity derailing the investigation.
If arguments like this reach an impasse then your comrades will resort to a quick game of rock, paper scissors to resolve the conflict.

This is amazing fun and can lead to alternate paths you might not have considered previously as part of your investigation.


The road is long

Divinity is long game.
If you're the obsessive type and feel the need to complete every side quest on offer then you can expect to spend nigh on 100 hours in Rivellon, so you'll definitely get your monies worth with regards to content................... (snip)


( To view the full review (and others) please take the time to visit http://www.review-well.com/ )
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51 of 63 people (81%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
68.9 hrs on record
Posted: October 15, 2014
It's been a while since I've fallen in love with a game as hard as I have with Divinity: Original Sin. It is a game with many glaring flaws, and those flaws are part of the reason I've come to love it. It's not everyone's cup of tea, but those who can stomach its initial few sluggish hours will find a meaty turn-based RPG that pays thorough respect to its CRPG predecessors like Baldur's Gate.

Those familiar with pen & paper RPGs, as well as roguelike elements, will feel right at home here. Combat is tough and involved. The game uses mechanics familiar to paper players while being relatively accessible to modern gamers (none of that THAC0 nonsense!). Larian has developed a smart, stern RPG that offers its charm in its unforgivingly old-school game design with absolutely zero handholding. Very few map markers. No quest arrows. Why am I surrounded by level 15 invincible enemies at level 10?!

If you like Dungeons & Dragons or TBRPGs in similar veins like Shadowrun Returns, you owe it to yourself to play Divinity: Original Sin. Best enjoyed with a friend who will antagonize you.
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65 of 90 people (72%) found this review helpful
39.9 hrs on record
Posted: November 4, 2014
I've got so many pros to say about this game, that I have to make a tl;dr for the tl;dr!!! If you ever were a fan of Baldur's Gate Series, Icewind Dale, or other rpgs like them, this is a MUST-PLAY (only this one is a turn-based and not a real-time pause)!
I also recommend it for PnP (pen 'n' paper) players (as I am one). The thing I love about games with this concept, is that they aren't typical dungeon crawling and boring games. Your characters develop with almost every click you make. Many options in dialogs, and you are free to do almost anything you want inside the game's borders.

(DUAL WIELD)
Just a comment for the dual wielding, as many seemed disapointed that there isn't that feat-skill in the game. I know it would be cool to have a 2*1h character, which can attack multiple times, but as it seems the developers didn't implemented it. Was it difficult to make changes in the code they had so far? Was it because they thought 1h is easier than 2*1h to handle (as the offhand has to have some penalties)? Was it because of the game's balance? Either way, with a rogue and a dagger at level 3, you can make 8 backstabs in a single turn. This overflows the gap for me, and makes me laugh.

Thank you for your time reading my review.
Sincerely,
eThi.
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42 of 53 people (79%) found this review helpful
76.9 hrs on record
Posted: November 6, 2014
Complexity. It’s an old RPG trait largely forgotten by a lot of gamers and ignored by most developers. If you like your RPG’s action-oriented and filled with commodities such as quest markers, move right along. Divinity: Original Sin from Belgian developer Larian assumes you’re prepared to actually figure out quite a bit all on your own. It provides a large game world and simply lets you wander around in it. Areas aren’t closed off, all quests can be finished in at least two different ways and you won’t be punished for playing your own way. It brings about the kind of design philosophy that really should exist in every RPG, regardless of its style, combat system or any other differentiating feature.

The story follows two main protagonists who start out as Source Hunters trying to figure out a local murder mystery. Naturally, soon they find themselves involved in something much bigger including an orc invasion, undead uprising, mad kings in a frozen land inhabited by elementals and they’ll even visit other dimensions and take to the heavens. Unfortunately, this is the weakest part of the game as the writing isn’t particularly compelling and the characterization is awfully shallow, especially regarding the playable characters. Speaking of which, apart from the two main characters, you’ll be able to recruit more people along the way. However, you’ll only be able to keep up to four in your party. Any others will await for your call in a place called the Hall of Heroes if you get the urge to switch them up a bit.

The only real reason to switch characters is to try out different classes and tactics. The character upgrade system is extremely deep and customizable, each class is extremely different with a load of unique traits, abilities and spells. And it’s extremely flexible as well. Just because you committed to a certain class at the beginning doesn’t mean you’re stuck with it if you change your mind. On the contrary, you can mix things up and create something like a rogue specialized in fire spells. You can customize all characters further with weapons and equipment you find along the way. And there’s a ton of loot in this game. Upgrading and customizing your character as well as constantly finding new loot is a huge source of addiction and probably the biggest motivation to continue playing.

Original Sin has a turn-based combat system which is awesome because it’s not an under-the-hood system with pause, but with actual turns akin to a regular turn-based strategy game. Apart from being able to witness the myriad of different combat styles, the combat shines thanks to its fantastic convergence of elemental powers. For example, summoning rain will create puddles on the ground and will make your enemies wet. Throwing a lightning bolt onto one enemy will fry him, but will also zap anyone standing in a puddle nearby. Then you can throw a fireball which will dry out the puddles and create mist that will cause enemies to have limited sight. Frozen surfaces will make characters slip and fall, spilled poison can be ignited for additional damage, the possibilities are nearly endless. Naturally, considering that everything you cast on the battlefield will affect your party as well, you have to be careful what you’re doing at all times. It’s just a superb system that never gets old.

Divinity: Original Sin is a fantastic looking game, however the art style isn’t particularly distinctive and falls under usual fantasy tropes a bit too often. The same can be said about the soundtrack, it’s definitely pleasing and appropriate, but just doesn’t really stand out in any way. My biggest complaint about the game is that it can be incredibly obtuse at times, particularly regarding the puzzle design. You will actually get hints from books and other sources, but I honestly don’t know what frame of mind you have to be in to figure some of this stuff out. This can get especially frustrating due to how big the world is and considering that a lot of quests span across multiple huge areas.

Divinity: Original Sin is one of the big Kickstarter success stories – a rewarding, addictive and unapologetic hardcore RPG brimming with complexity, gameplay depth and content breadth. If only it had a more motivating story, more interesting characters and a more unique game world, it would have been a masterpiece. Still, a few design quibbles aside, this is a great game that will delight anyone looking for a true RPG that brings back cherished genre values and wraps them up in a modern package.

8 OUT OF 10 (GREAT)
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39 of 49 people (80%) found this review helpful
2 people found this review funny
104.4 hrs on record
Posted: September 23, 2014
Fantastic RPG game. One of the best in years.

PROS

-No fetch quests
-No grinding
-Great leveling system that rewards you for exploration, fighting, and arguing with npcs
-Enormous amounts of skills and freedom to build you're own party (up to 4 people) any way you want
-Fun story with lots of depth.
-Perfect soundtrack to catch the feel of the fantasy world
-Amazing turn based combat with a lot of emphasis on the surrounding environment. Gameplay is superb
-One of the best AI in a long time. They can do to you anything you can do to them in combat. Very unpredictable
-Fun and smart sandbox elements that can only be rivaled by Bethesda games.
-Challenging puzzles that will take you back in time when those old Resident Evil games picked your brain
-Co-op


CONS


......


No cons. Game is a masterpiece. People nitpick small things like inventory being cumbersome or lack of hand holding. But none of those things are big enough to be worthy of a con. This game is too good. 5-10 years from now it will be even better because people will realize how much better it is than most other game released in todays industry. Its one of those things thats gotta slowly sink in. The first couple hours of the game can be very overwhelming. But once you get past that inital learning curve you will be sucked into an amazing fantasy world. One of the most addicting games I have ever played.

10 out of 10. Would fall for trap again. INTRUDER SPIED!!!!!
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99 of 152 people (65%) found this review helpful
2 people found this review funny
36.9 hrs on record
Posted: October 8, 2014
I made a guy bleed his own blood and then electrified the pool of blood he was standing in to stun him, and then dropped a boulder on him. A poisonous boulder. And then I froze some blood and made enemies slip around on it. It's basically Magical ♥♥♥♥♥♥♥s: The Game. GOTY 2014
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141 of 230 people (61%) found this review helpful
5 people found this review funny
104.4 hrs on record
Posted: October 3, 2014
I'd write a review, but its been difficult enough manipulating the keyboard to type this brief sentence with my massive erection in the way. 10/10
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32 of 42 people (76%) found this review helpful
82.3 hrs on record
Posted: November 26, 2014
Divinity: Origin Sin is a top-down, turned-based Role-Playing-Game that does without the hand-holding, 'let me guide you through my story and you'll learn to love it' experience. There's a huge emphasis on freedom; genuine freedom, not the kind that lets you do what you want for five minutes before prompting you there's a quest you should be doing. In short, Divinity: Origin Sin raises it's middle finger to the concept of guidance and allows the player to decide what to do and when to do it.

Graphics:

In every aspect, this game is beautiful, and arguablly one of the best looking games, not just within it's genre, but within in all games, ever.

From the huge towns filled with NPC's to the lonely mountain passes, the game world feels alive and genuine; never do you feel like you're following a path, you feel as you should, as if you're exploring this huge, open world with a story behind it, and everyone within.

It's difficult to describe the graphics in this game purely because they're done so well. There is particle effects, high-quality textures, gorgeous lighting and a strong sense of atmosphere everywhere you go. You might be exploring an old celler, in which case it's misty and gloomy, whilst in town centres the sun is pumping pure beauty upon the entire world. The game is simply gorgeous and without doubt, the best looking game within it's genre, by a large margin.

Audio:

From the subtle creeks of floor-boards to the raging torrents that is the mountain pass winds, Divnity: Origin Sin delivers a flawless experience in auditory experience.

The best possible way to explain the quality of audio in this game would be to ask you to think of a game, any game at all that you think has the best audio. You might say Amnesia because it's subtle but terrorfying or perhaps you might say Child of Light for it's amazing soundtracks, and both would be correct, and I'm sure other examples you might have suggested would be too, but most games have one particular aspect within it's audio that's memorable or excels in some aspect. This isn't true for Divinity: Origin Sin. This game excels in every aspect, from voice acting to the empowering shimmers and charges that spark when casting a spell.

It's simply perfect - And that's not a comment I would make lightly.

Gameplay:

Divinity: Origin Sin is a turn-based game, but only within combat. Outside of combat you're free to explore and roam the world in any way you please. You might find yourself engaging enemies that are a few levels higher than you; you might help an old man steal some fish, then report him to the guards and watch him be dragged away to prison or perhaps you simply want to go around the entire world slaying every single living thing that stands in your way. Freedom is what makes Divinity: Origin Sin so immersive and enjoyable, you're never tied down or told what to do, or when.

This game is hardcore, but not in regards to it's difficulty, more in terms of how it presents itself. There are no exclimation marks above NPC's heads to signify importance. There is no charts or tables to show you crafting receipes. There is a lot missing, but it's a very positive aspect of the game that makes it so much more enjoyable and immersive than other Role-Playing-Games. To find out how to craft a weapon, a potion or how to cook a pie, you must find a book, or a note and read it. You won't unlock the receipe, everything is available to craft as long as you know how to do it. Once you find the receipe, you simply need to refer back to it when creating the item. When deciding to complete quests, to find out where to go or what to do, you must talk to NPC's and listen. The information given to you is only useful if you read what was said. There will be no waypoint given or a 'Hey, good job finding that clue, i'll remove all challenge from this game and simply tell you what to do now'. It's challenging, but rewarding.

The combat is much alike what you would expect. Every character involved within the combat scenario will take turns, have a set amount of action points and, if they choose, can reserve points for future turns. The system is very fluid and intuative. What makes the combat, and gameplay so enjoyable however, is the emphasis on environmental interaction. See a group of enemies standing in water? Why not zap them with lightning and fry them? -No? How about we freeze the water and stick them in their place. Perhaps you want to spill some oil and ignite it, or perhaps use a teleport spell to throw an enemy off a cliff. If you can think of it, you can probably do it.

Narrative and Lore:

Now I'll admit, I'm not the kind of person who is likely to sit down and read every piece of lore or material in a game, especially not role-playing-games. I generally don't have the patience nor' interest, so perhaps this next statement will give some meaning to the quality of the writing in this game.

I've played for about 15 hours, at the time of writing this review, and have read every single piece of material I've found, and generally find it annoying when I then switch to co-op, and have my partner skip through it all. The writing in this game is really well written, and because of the nature of the game, enaging and meaningful. I know if I don't read it, I won't know what to do. It's almost like a very intelligent scheme plotted by the developers to discourage skipping through material, and I like that.

Co-op:

The game allows for four characters to be played at any given time, in co-op, you can play alongside another player and control up to two each. There is no limations in co-op, everything you can do it single player, you can do it co-op, but arguablly, it's more enjoyable when played with a friend due to a feature that allows you to argue amongst your characters about what choices to make it quests. Perhaps I want to slay the target, whilst you want to help them. Lets discuss it with in-game dialouge, then argue and see who wins. It's genuinally enjoyable and adds a new layer to the immersion of the games experience.

There is also a mod, for those interested, that allows the game to be played four-player co-op, so if that's of interest, good news for you!

Mods and Editors:

That game supports workshop, mods and even comes with the developer tools to create your own custom campaigns. I've toyed around with this a little, and not being a guru of game development software, I can say it's actually pretty easy to use. There is some script-writing to do when creating dialouges, cutscenes or combat sequences, but there are plenty of easy-to-understand tutorials that can be found within the discussion pages of the Steam community hub as well as on media sites such as YouTube to help guide beginners in creating their own mods.

Whilst I'm unlikely to spend much time using these features myself, it's a great addition to have and ultimately means there's a huge pool of endless content to play with once you've completed the main game. That's never a bad thing.

Overall:

Divinity: Origin Sin is a beautifully crafted RPG that was obviously created by developers who genuinally cared about their product. Every aspect of the game feels polished once, and once again. The game runs perfectly at maximum settings on my GTX 760 and AMD FX-8350 at more than 120FPS solid, without hiccups. The gameplay is hugely enjoyable, the lore is engaging and the hardcore approach to giving the player complete freedom makes this one of the best turn-based role-playing-games, ever.

No game is without it's flaws ~ I just can't single out anything I dislike, honestly it's near perfect.

It's a masterpiece, a genuine must buy for any RPG fan.
~One of the most enjoyable and engaging experiences to be found within gaming.
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26 of 32 people (81%) found this review helpful
12.4 hrs on record
Posted: October 20, 2014
Takes a bit to get used to, there is a lot to learn. Once you do, you are in for one of the most amazing experiences. This could be the deepest game I've played. Your imagination is the limit, huge amounts of customization, great exploration, epic battles and loot. This is everything you ever wanted in an RPG.
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154 of 256 people (60%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
50.9 hrs on record
Posted: August 15, 2014
At first I was in love with this game. The combat system seemed impressive. The world grand and immersive. But as the game goes on it sadly becomes monotonous.

To start there is way too much walking. I'm pretty sure I've lost hours just going from point A to point B within the first town. Even so, I soon became disappointed by the shrinking size of the towns to follow.

The fighting became repetitive and unchallenging. Instead of being easy to learn and difficult to master its more of a grace period of learning skills and their crowd controlling effects. Then rinse, wash, repeat. Regrettably the most important feature of the combat system is the ability to quicksave and quickload. Which you will be doing quite frequently.

The drop system is flawed. For awhile I wasn't sure belts even existed in this game. Because I hadn't seen one drop in the first 15 or so hours of play. You best option soon becomes saving before opening a chest and then reloading until you finally get a beneficial drop. The inventory management system is tedious. Managing which item is being held in which characters inventory is a task that's spreadsheet worthy.

The quest can be quite vague at times. Your going to have to read every bit of dialog to find out the next quest and that's okay. It's a refreshing change from skip, skip, skip, check the map for a quest marker or look for the guy with the yellow exclamation point over his head type of game play. But even doing so can still leave you clueless as to what to do next. Having to google it, something I do only last resort, is a game breaking feature.

The non-linear game play isn't exactly non-linear. You can begin the quest in any order you like. But as you soon find out this leads to more confusion then freedom and in a few cases incompleteable quest.
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74 of 117 people (63%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
47.1 hrs on record
Posted: November 7, 2014
For me, games is good if :
1. Make me think HARDER
2. Make me FEAR
3. Make me MAD
4. Make me forget about LIFE

It's what i call FUN!
This game is one of those games that made me not regret having bought it, that's RARE..:)
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20 of 23 people (87%) found this review helpful
87.1 hrs on record
Posted: January 1
Don't you miss out on this masterpiece. Seriously, don't. It's a crime to not buy this game at its current prize! This game adds so many countless of hours which you can just soak your tiny head into like a gigantic sponge... So many hours and so much replay value, it would be a shame to see you waste your money on a mindless shooter when this game is at your doorstep, begging to get in. If you love old-school RPG's like me, then this is defiantly a must-have. Even Kirk Hamilton thinks this game is one of his favorites... What other reason do you need than that?
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26 of 35 people (74%) found this review helpful
72.6 hrs on record
Posted: July 30, 2014
Engrossing stories with witty dialogue, your choice shapes your characters,
mixed with all the right ingredients to be the best RPG game of year 2014.

"9/10"
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21 of 27 people (78%) found this review helpful
47.4 hrs on record
Posted: November 11, 2014
+ very rare attention to details, both in graphics, music and storywriting
+ huge amount of missions, quests, and gameplay lenght, it is easy to sink 40-50 hours into one playthrough
+ an old-school, Baldur's Gate-style RPG with a new coat
+ Lone Wolf trait option for single player (only 2 chars intead of 4)
+ everything you do is permanent (although you have to pay attention to the character development)
+ great coop possibilities, with Workshop, even for 4 different players
+ adjustable difficulty

- rock-paper-scissors game (adds to the luck factor, I personally didn't like it)
- and advantage is also a disadvantage, it is not for everyone, due to the length and difficulty level

If you were ever amazed by a 3rd person RPG, this is your game, and by buying, you also support an independent developer.
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31 of 46 people (67%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
67.9 hrs on record
Posted: December 15, 2014
This game is seriously overrated, played more than 50 hours and most of them were you guessed it, running around looking for quests or reloading after some ♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥ that goes in combat.Baldur's Gate had great gameplay, this game doesn't, to start you must use elements to win and for that you need to be a mage one way or the other, warriors, archers and rogues are screwed if they don't use elements, plus the system is further flawed when you realize that there is no freedom, you must follow the same path all the time yet because it is "old school" it gets a free card, you must do the damn quests in town ( all linked mind you) to be able to stand a chance against overpowered enemies.

Another gameplay flaw, poor AI that has to be made up with enemies always being stronger and numerous than you that on top of that will casts crowd control spells on you max 4 min 2 members, in fact this game can only be won by abusing of CC, try to take on enemies with meele, ranged and magic that has no crowd control ( no ♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥ stunned, freezing and slipping, smoke and any other), you'll get stomped all the damn time.

Lets not forget the wonderful loot that is randomnised like in a ARPG, so unless you are lucky, keep reloading to abuse the system.

There is far more to say, for instance useless and too few talents, non-sensical trait system, the skill and attribute system making hybrids or any custom class crap, constant misclicking, bad UI, the long and long battles ( all the same every playthrough, no random encounters), the bad mapping, bugs and glitches, bad crafting system and lack of deph in the world, you will fight undead most of the time, with the same tactics, same weapon types, same companions, same awful story and the ♥♥♥♥♥♥♥ same slow movement and animation!
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20 of 27 people (74%) found this review helpful
101.8 hrs on record
Posted: October 17, 2014
Incredible co-op. I wish more games had a co-op system so well done like this.
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17 of 22 people (77%) found this review helpful
156.3 hrs on record
Posted: August 16, 2014
This game reminded me strongly of Baldur's Gate and Icewind Dale, though with true turn-based combat and more humor. Instead of creating an entire party of adventurers, though, you only create two (you can pick up two more pre-made companions of pretty much any configuration later on). Overall, I think the developers did a great job, and the few nitpicks I have with it will hopefully be addressed with patches or mods later on.

For me, the game's main appeals are the strategic combat and the vibrant level designs. Almost every combat was interesting--just around the time you start getting bored, you'll gain a level and some new abilities or weapons to freshen things up (as will the monsters).

My first playthrough was maddeningly difficult because I chose a rogue as my main character and, worse, tried to explore a harder part of the map before I was ready. In general, you should find areas where the monsters are the same level as your party. I find that even a single level difference will make the combat frustrating if not infuriating, with the mobs resisting pretty much anything you throw at them. Unfortunately, it's not always clear where you should or can go next, so you might need to resort to a walkthrough or quest guide occasionally to make sure you haven't missed something important. I know a lot of "hardcore" types were responsible for the lack of guidance in this game (it was Kickstarter-funded), but a bit more detail in the quest log sure wouldn't have hurt anything in my opinion.

I ended up starting over with two fighter types, a wizard, and an archer, and ditched the rogue. Unlike most CRPGs, lockpicking isn't a big deal here, and any character can be trained to do thief skills anyway. I found stealthing and backstabbing to be more trouble than they were worth, and there's no dual wielding. I liked my archer much better.

The only real complaint I have is the pace of the battles. Inexplicably, there is no slider bar for ratcheting up spell animations and the like. After you've seen the same 4-second winding-up animation for the hundreth time, you may be yearning for a way to skip over them. I actually found myself getting up to refill my tea during combat, and the computer still wasn't finished taking its turn when I got back.

Another vital tip is to learn shields as soon as possible. It wasn't clear to me what these were, since they are titled something like "fire resistance shield," which makes it sound like they're just good for, well, resisting fire. To the contrary, they'll protect you from anything, but have bonues and penalties associated with the element. Another major concern are "surfaces," such as oil slicks, water puddles, blood, poison gas, and so on. These will often react quite violently to elemental effects, and can easily destroy your own characters if you aren't very careful. I found myself just taking lightning bolts and such off my quick bar, since most of the time I just stunned my own characters with them.

Still, overall I enjoyed this game very much and looked forward to playing it more. It's been awhile since I had to stop playing a game because I was too sleepy, rather than too bored, to coninue. If you liked Baldur's Gate and Icewind Dale back in the day, this is about as close to that experience that I've been able to find in a modern release. Enjoy!
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