The Age of Decadence is a turn-based, hardcore role-playing game set in a low magic, post-apocalyptic fantasy world. The game features a detailed skill-based character system, multiple skill-based ways to handle quests, choices & consequences, and extensive dialogue trees.
User reviews:
Recent:
Very Positive (93 reviews) - 94% of the 93 user reviews in the last 30 days are positive.
Overall:
Very Positive (1,127 reviews) - 84% of the 1,127 user reviews for this game are positive.
Release Date: Oct 14, 2015

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Includes 2 items: The Age of Decadence, Dungeon Rats

 

Recent updates View all (41)

November 4

Dungeon Rats is released

http://steamcommunity.com/games/531930/announcements/detail/816669279811440691

What does it have to do with AoD, you ask? Well, to let you know that another game set in the AoD world is out, in case you're interested, and to update you on the final content release for AoD.

Now that Dungeon Rats is released on schedule, we can switch back to AoD. As mentioned previously, we need about 4 weeks to do the final content update, so we have plenty of time to make sure the update is out before the end of the year.

Since Dungeon Rats contains many combat improvements, you can expect to see them in AoD when the dust settles (probably in late Jan).

As always, thank you for your support.

7 comments Read more

September 15

Recent Updates & New RPG

While we didn’t post any announcements since March, we’ve been updating the game on a monthly basis (fixes, improvements, balance, tutorial, etc), so we continue supporting the game and paying attention to your feedback.

The final content update will be released in December (most likely). Think of it as a free DLC to thank you for your support and encouragement. It will extend the endgame and introduce a new ending (among other things).

Note for Radeon users: a couple of months ago we updated the engine to the latest version which didn’t go well with Radeon drivers, which caused slowdowns and forced some players to lower Lighting to be able to play the game. We contacted AMD , they managed to reproduce the problem and fix it, so if you have a Radeon card, make sure that you have the latest drivers (Radeon Software Crimson Edition 16.9.1)

In other news, we’d like to introduce our new RPG that’s entering the final stages of development.

* * *

Dungeon Rats, named after the 7th Heavy Armored Division of the Imperial Guards, is a turn-based, party-based dungeon crawler set in the same world as Age of Decadence. This is an RPG focused almost exclusively on squad level tactical combat for players who enjoy turn-based games in general, and AoD's combat systems in particular. If fighting your way out of a prison mine - and frequently dying in the attempt - is your idea of a good time, you've come to the right place.

Starting out as a new prisoner at the bottom of the gangs-ruled prison hierarchy, and of the prison itself, you must fight to survive and develop your combat skills, acquiring better weapons and equipment as you go. Recruit allies to your struggle or carry on as a lone wolf, and kill anyone foolish enough to stand in your way.

Notable changes from The Age of Decadence:

  • Party-based - the most frequently requested feature
  • Flanking and other strategic bonuses. Positioning matters a lot.
  • Manual placement of your characters before a fight
  • Charisma determines the number and quality of your party members
  • Skill points are split between the party members: more people means fewer skills points per person and slower level ups.
  • 10 possible companions, not all of them human (maximum party size is 4).
  • New weapons, armor, and creatures
  • 3 difficulty levels: Nice Guy, Tough Bastard, Murderous Psychopath

Some screenshots (work in progress):





61 comments Read more

Reviews

“Age of Decadence is an RPG to its core. It offers the player a wealth of choices, many of them carrying lofty consequences along with them. The core design element of player choice transcends simple dialogue choices, as players can progress through the game in a variety of styles. Many games offer up the illusion of choice while failing to actually deliver, but Age of Decadence serves up difficult and tangible crossroads with no looking back. It may have some rough spots, but it is one of the most well-designed RPGs I have had the pleasure of enjoying.”
9/10 – Destructoid

“But Age of Decadence wants nothing to do with kobolds, just as it wants nothing to do with Doo-dads of Unimaginable Power. The overarching idea is a crumbling society divided among three noble Houses, each fumbling around in its own version of darkness to comprehend what destroyed the world. That’s the central mystery. It plays out like noir in that you are the detective, piecing together what really happened from differing accounts, all vividly written with clear voices and efficient prose. And like a detective in a noir yarn, you can’t help but become part of the central mystery, effecting an outcome you might not have intended. Age of Decadence might run away from you.”
4/5 – Quarter to Three

“The Age of Decadence is a dream game from fans of the purest form of cRPG to others. An very interesting narrative driven title with a superb C&C system in place, a well meditated combat system and a world and inhabitants that keep surprising you at every step.”
9/10 – Meristation

About This Game

The Age of Decadence, our first but hopefully not the last RPG, is now available. If you've been following it or playing it in Early Access, you know what to expect. If you've just discovered it, "stay awhile and listen". The most commonly asked question is:

What Kind of Game Is It?


It’s a very different game than anything you’ve ever played. I’m sure you’ve noticed that the RPG genre hasn’t really been explored yet and most RPGs follow the formula that didn’t change in 20 years. While there were always games that strayed off the beaten path – Darklands, Planescape: Torment, King of Dragon Pass – such games were the exceptions that only reinforced the rule.

The Age of Decadence is an experiment, an attempt to explore a different direction, taking you back to the PnP roots of the genre. It doesn’t mean that the game is awesome. In fact, there is a good chance that you won’t like it, precisely because we took too many liberties with the established design.

So What Sets The Age of Decadence Apart From Other Games?

1. The Setup


Traditionally, many fantasy RPGs are about killing things, clearing up dungeons, and being a hero. There is nothing wrong with mindless fun and wish fulfillment, but we want to offer you something different. To quote Tom Chick (Quarter to Three's game critic):

"But Age of Decadence wants nothing to do with kobolds, just as it wants nothing to do with Doo-dads of Unimaginable Power. The overarching idea is a crumbling society divided among three noble Houses, each fumbling around in its own version of darkness to comprehend what destroyed the world. That’s the central mystery. It plays out like noir in that you are the detective, piecing together what really happened from differing accounts, all vividly written with clear voices and efficient prose. And like a detective in a noir yarn, you can’t help but become part of the central mystery, effecting an outcome you might not have intended."

The Age of Decadence is not a game about killing monsters or exploring mystical lands, but rather, surviving amid the greed and brutality of your fellow humans and carving out a name for yourself. Good and bad are purely relative. It’s a world of scheming and backstabbing in which your words and actions have the potential to forge alliances and sow discord, and your path is never certain.

You get to play with seven different factions: three Noble Houses and four 'professional' guilds: merchants, assassins, thieves, and the army, all fighting for power or influence; over 100 named characters, over 750 ‘generic’ characters with unique IDs taking part in violent take-overs, assassinations, and power grabs, and over 600,000 words of dialogue: a well-developed and thought through world, believable characters, realistic motivations, but no elves, dwarves, magic, and wizards in fashionable, pointy hats.

2. Combat difficulty


Another design aspect worth mentioning is combat difficulty. It’s a hard game.

Combat difficulty is integrated into the setting. You can’t say that the world is harsh and unforgiving and then let the player kill everyone who looks at him or her funny. The game has to be hard, dying should be easy, and you should have reasons to pick your fights.

You aren’t a powerful hero who can defeat anyone and save the world and it is the difficulty that reinforces this notion. Make the game easier and we’re back to the powerful hero setup. So unless you’re a natural born killer, watch what you say and think before you act or you’ll end up dead before you can blink.

3. Choices & Consequences


Choices are what the game is all about - crafting your own narrative via a variety of choices that alter the story, playing field, and your options down the road. From multiple quest solutions to branching questlines you'll have plenty decisions to make and consequences of said decisions to deal with, which is what makes the game incredibly replayable.

Starting the game as a mercenary and joining the Imperial Guards will give a completely different experience, different quests, different content and points of view than, say, playing the game as a merchant (less buying low and selling high, more scheming and plotting to gain advantages for the guild), a praetor serving a Noble House, or an assassin.

The questlines are interwoven, forming a large, overarching story, so playing the game only once will be like witnessing events from a single perspective, which is limited by default. You will have to play the game several times to better understand what’s going on, piece everything together, and see the full effect of the choices you make.

The Big Question: Should You Buy The Game?


Try before you buy. Even if everything I said sounds exactly like your kind of game, try the demo first. That’s what it’s there for. It gives you access to the first Chapter, consisting of 3 locations and about 30 quests split between mutually exclusive questlines and decisions.

System Requirements

    Minimum:
    • OS: Windows XP/Vista/Windows 7/Windows 8/Windows 10
    • Processor: 2 GHz Processor or better
    • Memory: 3 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Nvidia Geforce GTS 250 / Radeon HD 4770 (1Gb) or better
    • DirectX: Version 9.0c
    • Storage: 1900 MB available space
    Recommended:
    • OS: Windows 7/Windows 8/Windows 10
    • Processor: 2.5 GHz Processor or better
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Graphics: Nvidia Geforce GTS 450 / Radeon HD 4870 (1Gb) or better
    • DirectX: Version 9.0c
    • Storage: 1900 MB available space
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