Bientôt l’été is a videogame for two players. Two players who pretend to be lovers. They pretend to be lovers separated from each other by lightyears of deep space. They have lonely walks along the shore of a simulated ocean, thinking wistful thoughts of each other. Thoughts from ancient Earth literature by Marguerite Duras.
User reviews:
Overall:
Mixed (215 reviews) - 43% of the 215 user reviews for this game are positive.
Release Date: Feb 6, 2013

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Packages that include this game

Buy The Tale of Tales Experience

Includes 6 items: Bientôt l'été, Fatale, Luxuria Superbia, Sunset, The Graveyard, The Path

 

Reviews

Fast company - "Bientôt l’Été resonates like an accomplished painting or a good piece of music."

The Verge - "Finally, a video game as artistic and hard to understand as French films."

Akimbo - "I was at times elated by the beauty of the sentiments expressed and, at other times, surprised by how dark it could feel."

About This Game

Bientôt l’été is a videogame for two players. Two players who pretend to be lovers. They pretend to be lovers separated from each other by lightyears of deep space. They have lonely walks along the shore of a simulated ocean, thinking wistful thoughts of each other. Thoughts from ancient Earth literature by Marguerite Duras.


The empty beach, the strong wind, the gentle music and a small colony of electric seagulls are their only companions. Yet their heart is full and their mind confused. Walk along the shore, until they meet the emptiness.


When it all becomes too much, they run towards each other. Enabled by intergalactic networks, they touch each other’s holographic bodies in cyberspace. A surreal game of chess becomes the apparatus through which they, man and woman, can talk. The words they have were given to them, as they have always been to lovers everywhere.


The sea remains, tugging at their hearts when not at their hairs and clothes, as it itself is tugged by the virtual moon. And as great as the desire for the other may be, they cannot stay away from the wind and the waves and the sand. Every time they find a new treasure. An abandoned tennis field. An heap of coal. A dead dog. Ordinary. Absurd. Meaningless. Yet comforting.


Enter a café, exit a villa, enter a casino, exit the ruin of an ancient colonial mansion. We know this is not real. So it doesn’t surprise us. Nothing surprises us. It doesn’t matter when you feel the pain of love. Of being in love, of falling in love, of leaving in love. There is no such thing as time. There is only love. And it never stops. No matter how much it hurts.

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
    Minimum:
    • OS:XP
    • Processor:2 Ghz
    • Memory:2 GB RAM
    • Graphics:Geforce 7600, Radeon X1600
    • Hard Drive:500 MB HD space
    Recommended:
    • OS:7
    • Processor:3 Ghz
    • Memory:3 GB RAM
    Minimum:
    • OS:10.6.8
    • Processor:2 Ghz
    • Memory:2 GB RAM
    • Graphics:Geforce 7600, Radeon X1600
    • Hard Drive:500 MB HD space
    Recommended:
    • OS:10.6.8
    • Processor:3 Ghz
    • Memory:3 GB RAM
Customer reviews
Customer Review system updated! Learn more
Overall:
Mixed (215 reviews)
Recently Posted
✪ cowmilk | kickback.com
( 0.3 hrs on record )
Posted: April 24
not a game... just an artistic piece.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Ken Fung
( 1.1 hrs on record )
Posted: April 24
sllow
Helpful? Yes No Funny
chthonic
( 2.8 hrs on record )
Posted: March 21
This is something really special. Bientôt l'été reminds me not of other games, but of novels (by Maurice Blanchot), films (by Marguerite Duras) and paintings (by Henri Matisse). It has the most basic gameplay, which consists of walking along the shore and placing chess pieces on a chess board (but without actually playing the game of chess). It also has no story in the usual sense, instead it gives you a set of disjointed images and some kind of exquisite machine for producing texts.

Somehow Bientôt l'été generates an amazing experience, melancholic dream of the future. Just an "atmospheric exploration", yes, but what a fantastic atmosphere to feel, what an outlandish (yet familiar) place to explore. Picture is beautifully oversaturated, sometimes almost with one color, music and sounds blend together in a warm noise, waves hit the shore, some moons and planets travel across the sky, there is a single building nearby, couple talks in French inside. Player takes role of one of the lovers, who also act, participate in simulation. Communication in this world is difficult, you only have quotes and gestures, things unsaid. You try to speak and to listen.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Dragon Fucker
( 3.8 hrs on record )
Posted: March 8
this game is really weird to understand at first since its not really a GAME. its more like youre trying to participate in a painting or photograph. the game is about relationships with people, romantic or otherwise, and how your words and actions influence it positive or negative. in all, this is one of the most relaxing games ive played even if the "story" takes a turn for the worse. though i can understand some people's feelings about this game i really recommend it if youre a fan of artsy and surrealism since it has elements of surrealism within the game.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
bladesman2
( 0.4 hrs on record )
Posted: March 3
Aims at artsy and pretentious, lands in excrement.

I believe in the artistic potential of gaming, I really do. I listen to experimental music. I love Tarkovsky movies. I read Sartre. I've watch Waiting for Godot more than once. I might sound as though I'm the pretentious one, but that's sort of my point. I'm trying to dress myself up as I feel like exactly the type of person for whom this game would be created. And yet here I am, absent of any feelings for this game that aren't expletives.

I suppose if you enjoy wandering around trapped in negative space, desperately hoping that there will be some semblance of experience to be found, this might be for you.

Team Fortress 2 makes a thousand more powerful statements than this lazy half-made excuse of a game. "Not recommended" is as understated a point as whatever the developers had in mind.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
M4uZ
( 0.3 hrs on record )
Posted: March 3
I dont understand this game..
-Choose player... okay so i take the man
-Somehow I was teleported on the beach
-Oh! House Lets go...
-Sat at the table... and started playing... Chess i think?
-Something happened and i just woke up again on the beach
2/10... For them what like walking simulator and chess its about 4/10
Helpful? Yes No Funny
kat2kool
( 1.2 hrs on record )
Posted: February 22
I don't know what it would be like to play this with another person rather than the AI simulation but I suspect I'd still find it a rather boring experience.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
latvian
( 0.2 hrs on record )
Posted: February 10
reason why i don't recomend this game is at the end enjoy...

no idea why i played this
this is boring
so instead lets look at this wiki entry i like:
Computer game designer Chris Crawford, founder of The Journal of Computer Game Design, has attempted to define the term game using a series of dichotomies:

1 Creative expression is art if made for its own beauty, and entertainment if made for money.

2 A piece of entertainment is a plaything if it is interactive. Movies and books are cited as examples of non-interactive entertainment.

3 If no goals are associated with a plaything, it is a toy. (Crawford notes that by his definition, (a) a toy can become a game element if the player makes up rules, and (b) The Sims and SimCity are toys, not games.) If it has goals, a plaything is a challenge.

4 If a challenge has no "active agent against whom you compete," it is a puzzle; if there is one, it is a conflict. (Crawford admits that this is a subjective test. Video games with noticeably algorithmic artificial intelligence can be played as puzzles; these include the patterns used to evade ghosts in Pac-Man.)

5 Finally, if the player can only outperform the opponent, but not attack them to interfere with their performance, the conflict is a competition. (Competitions include racing and figure skating.) However, if attacks are allowed, then the conflict qualifies as a game.

Crawford's definition may thus be rendered as[original research?]: an interactive, goal-oriented activity made for money, with active agents to play against, in which players (including active agents) can interfere with each other.

why do i put this here?
oh no reason
no goals great so you guys immedatly did not make a ♥♥♥♥ing game
oh don't get me wrong it is good looking piece of software but it doesn't qualify above 3 on this list
i'm trying to figure out if it qualifies above 2 even... so basicly this is between a plaything and piece of interactive entertainment...
but is it even interactive? i could get someone probly to try this out along side me but tbh this is a book with ability to walk the pages...(bad comparison i agree)...
so this is not a game this is a weird artsy plaything(don't get me wrong i liek how it looks i'd like to see similar ideas implemented in actual GAME)

i was gona do a video review but tbh... not worth my editing time

now why i don't recoment this game:
IT IS NOT A GAME... barrack paper scicors on youtube is a better GAME(and with better love story)
Helpful? Yes No Funny
( 0.7 hrs on record )
Posted: December 10, 2015
and they say French lit is unpredictable
Helpful? Yes No Funny
( 0.1 hrs on record )
Posted: November 21, 2015
Meh
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Gnikrutuf
( 0.3 hrs on record )
Posted: November 20, 2015
A game is for fun.

This is pointless.
Boring.
Gives nothing.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Moofinseeker
( 0.6 hrs on record )
Posted: October 28, 2015
My ex bought me this game for a valentines' gift. The best part was that he said we could play this together, then never bought himself a copy. I had lots of fun wandering through the mind of a French alien on acid. At one point I saw a giant pile of coal. I guess that represented what I should have expected as a christmas gift from my ex.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Emmehkat
( 0.3 hrs on record )
Posted: October 6, 2015
I don't get it. At all. Why does this even exist.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
txster
( 0.1 hrs on record )
Posted: October 4, 2015
Looks like I can't review this really, since it's to be played with someone else but goooood luck connecting to anyone :\

So what's in there once you start the game? You walk your male or female avatar on a beach. Turn around, there's a house of sorts, which will change in appearance when you enter and come out. Inside, you can sit at a chess table, drink wine and smoke, place chess pieces on the board.. with a partner in front of you (most likely an AI since noone is ever around for real) doing the same.

You go back out.. from time to time there will be random things on the beach.. like a huge pile of coal.. a wheat field.. dead seagulls.. which you briefly watch and then 'collect' the memory of (which just means it disappears and your avatar bends down like picking up a pebble, there's no inventory or anything..). Going in each direction for a little while you realize the space is rather limited, but feels bigger since it's sooo empty.

And that's pretty much it.

What is it trying to say ? No clue.
What would be different if someone else was there for real ? No clue.
Is there any point to it ? No clue.
Is there more to be seen or experienced if you stick to it ? No clue. Was too bored to find out.
Does understanding French help at all? Absolutely not - native speaker here.

I did like the nighttime sky effects (time goes by when you close your eyes). That was about it.

So I really can't recommend it. Unless you're the type to go stare at a single blotch of paint on a white canvas at a museum and go "ooooooh, that's deep".
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Plinith
( 0.8 hrs on record )
Posted: September 21, 2015
This was interesting, but I wouldn't call "this" a game. $10 for less than hour worth of game play (not an exageration), and I've done everything there is to do in this thing. If this was cheaper, maybe it could have gotten better reviews. Most bad reviews I've read seem to share the same point of it not being worth the money.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Ithaqua
( 1.4 hrs on record )
Posted: September 10, 2015
Pro:
Weird ... well unusual anyways
Single & multiplayer
My french is rusty but I can get well enough to get everything
My toaster can run this game ... almost.

Con:
I'm not sure it's actually a game
No steam cards - achieves
$11 CDN - ROTFL
I can't say I would ever play this again

Overall:
5/10 (+1 weird/unusual, +1 specs, -1 not a game, -2 price) = 4/10
So thumbs sideways

I'm only going with thumbs down at this point in time due to the price. If you can get it at 75% or more off - or in a bundle - give it a try.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
victorzvyagin
( 3.0 hrs on record )
Posted: September 8, 2015
Okay, Basically- It's a Game like Skyrim, with guns, but without guns and Skyrim, BUT (!) with Ciggies. Oh, and 1 gun. and Chess.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
SpaceCouncil
( 0.4 hrs on record )
Posted: August 19, 2015
Honestly I'm mixed about this. I think its very cool and experimental for that hipster side of me that wants games to be something more than what they are in appearance, something deeper but I think this is a little too abstract. Its... different.

I don't know what this is. I'm not sure its supposed to be.. well, anything. Its just a thing. You can engage with it I suppose. You're just supposed to explore it seems.

The game gives you some hints on controls and guides you in a subjectively meaningful way IF you close your eyes. You'll figure it out. This is definetly one of those experimental games or... interactive art? I guess. Sticky subject regarding words these days.

I'll leave you with some thoughts I had while playing. Possible interpretations. An elaborate ruse to obfuscate that in life when you close your eyes you can move faster but we are still trapped?

My favorite thought I had however was a French sentient robot stuck in their own programming in love with itself as two separate beings.

This is definitely one to ponder about. If you're one of those so called “intellectuals” Otherwise, you just walk real slowly on a beach for awhile.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Bloo-Guhloo
( 0.8 hrs on record )
Posted: August 19, 2015
Cool not-game you have here, friend. Really glad you made your indie not-game that no one knows about reliant on having other people play it at the same time as you, when no one else plays this, makes me empathize with the AI for being stuck in there forever.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
mochiinvasion
( 8.9 hrs on record )
Posted: July 31, 2015
listen, you can call this an art game, and i'll question why you bought it in the first place. yes, this isn't a typical videogame. and it made me think and made me very sad.

also, i love tale of tales and you can meet me in the pit.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Most Helpful Reviews  Overall
138 of 151 people (91%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
0.3 hrs on record
Posted: November 25, 2013
Before noting that I said I do not recommend this, please understand that it's not bad.
With this confusing statement out of the way, let's get started. Bientôt l'été isn't a game. It's an artistic piece, and this needs to be understood. From what I could gather, the goal of it was to demonstrate how people can communicate, even if limited by language, actions, or possible phrases (as seen by the chess board in-game). However, this requires that someone somewhere is playing at the same time you are, unless you want to talk to an AI. It's a beautiful experience when it works well, but this is so rare I can't recommend a purchase at any time other than during a sale. Due to the game's artistic goal and nature, it was heavily slammed upon release, driving away potential players. Without a community waiting for another person to chat with, more people slammed the game for not having a community. This is Bientôt l'été's biggest problem, without players it simply cannot achieve the desired effect.
For this reason I suggest buying this when it's on sale. More players are likely to be experimenting with it at the same time as you, and you're more likely to see the beauty of limited conversation with a complete stranger.
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35 of 40 people (88%) found this review helpful
2 people found this review funny
Not Recommended
0.5 hrs on record
Posted: January 16, 2014
Before you, I never knew anguish. I tried to Imagine myself without you.

This game is about walking on the beach. And drinking wine. And smoking cigarrettes. And conversations that are incredibly fatalistic.

I liked the feeling I had after I played this game, but I cannot recommend it. I feel like it's more like a prototype for a mini-game. Kind of like a dream sequence or something, that keeps you from getting bored with the actual game, except there is no actual game. Just uselessness coupled with self-hate. C'est la vie.
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52 of 73 people (71%) found this review helpful
57 people found this review funny
Recommended
3.2 hrs on record
Posted: February 12, 2013
This is, by far, the best cigarette smoking simulator on the market. At first, it seemed confusing with the long walks on the beach and random phrases popping up on screen, but only once I entered the café did I realize the actual draw of this title. As I sat at the chess board and waited five minutes for a partner to join, I then realized something else; I was the only person to buy this game. Thank god they included a computer controlled character to interact with or I may have missed the hidden gem in this pile of coal.
We moved our chess pieces across the board and spoke sweet nothings to each other until only silence hung in the air. And then I saw it. Near the bottom of the screen was a classic lighter and a half full soft pack of smokes. Move over wine glass! The true beauty and meaning of game play was at hand. Once clicked, the screen goes black and you can actually hear your character click the flint, light up, and take a long, smooth drag. You can almost taste the tobacco. A puff of smoke fills the screen upon return to the scene. The cigarette is then seen majestically smoldering in the ashtray on the table. If clicked again, another drag is taken until there is nothing but a snuffed out filter left.
Oh, but that's just the beginning. It seems there is no limit to the amount of cigarettes you can smoke! My only complaint would be that there aren't enough ways to put out your coffin nail. The choice to put it out on your lover's hand or leave it floating in their wine glass should be included in a future patch for the sole reason that some of the predestined lines are mad creepy. 8 out of 10 because I can't tell if they're menthol or not.
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21 of 24 people (88%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
0.2 hrs on record
Posted: December 4, 2013
Game developers should be encouraged to challenge the status quo with narrative and mechanics, but I feel that there are certain best practices for game design that Tale of Tales often overlooks for no visible reason or benefit to the game. While Bientôt l'été has the most conventional controls and straightforward instructions of their games to date, it still suffers from the same problem: some strange design decisions have little to nothing to do with, and may even hinder the concept.

Imagine the PS3 game Journey: two players meet at random in a surreal world to make a connection. Except in Bientôt l'été, both players are chat robots stating phrases at random while smoking cigarettes, drinking wine, and playing chess (with a catch: you have to find the pieces first, but one at a time). The highlight of the game should be the multiplayer, but unfortunately it doesn't seem to be very populated (a symptom of its avant garde concept, I guess), and the interactions are severely limited.

What should be a virtual date with a stranger in a surreal world becomes tedius, with no real interaction or connection with said stranger. Unlike Journey, which limits your characters' intractability to serve the purpose of the mechanics and design, Bientôt l'été's design stands at odds with its concept, preventing players from creating any kind of meaningful connections.
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16 of 20 people (80%) found this review helpful
4 people found this review funny
Not Recommended
1.5 hrs on record
Posted: December 26, 2013
This hits a very niche market... and not very well. I typically really enjoy introspective forlorn romps through artsy settings, but this is a bit of a streatch even for me.

Spoilers follow:


No seriously, there's nothing to this game, so litterally anything I say past this point will "ruin" it for you.

Don't read further unless you've either already played it our have no intention to.


So the idea is that you go for long walks on the beach reflecting on this relationship you've had. Sometimes there's something on the beach that will drop a chess peice which you can take to the house and use on a chess board to hold something resembling a conversation with an online partner... The dialouge seems to suggest that these two love each other out of necessity and not for any actual romantic reasons... they don't seem to actually like each other but are bound to eachother anyway. It's really sad...These two need to see other people, but it's clear that there are no other fish in the sea, so to speak.
Oh, and once you've collected all the chess peices, the next item to drop is a gun... well that escalated quickly. You can use the gun on the chess board like a peice. It does nothing in particular, but I think it's more meant to be a metaphore for putting an end to the relationship more than anything.

To sum up the game: Help I'm trapped in a holodeck of angst and regret! I don't know what love is and I want to kill myself because I'm so messed up about it!
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51 of 84 people (61%) found this review helpful
22 people found this review funny
Recommended
0.6 hrs on record
Posted: June 21, 2014
Just played it while I was drunk and somehow it was good.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
16 of 21 people (76%) found this review helpful
4 people found this review funny
Not Recommended
0.1 hrs on record
Posted: October 4, 2015
Looks like I can't review this really, since it's to be played with someone else but goooood luck connecting to anyone :\

So what's in there once you start the game? You walk your male or female avatar on a beach. Turn around, there's a house of sorts, which will change in appearance when you enter and come out. Inside, you can sit at a chess table, drink wine and smoke, place chess pieces on the board.. with a partner in front of you (most likely an AI since noone is ever around for real) doing the same.

You go back out.. from time to time there will be random things on the beach.. like a huge pile of coal.. a wheat field.. dead seagulls.. which you briefly watch and then 'collect' the memory of (which just means it disappears and your avatar bends down like picking up a pebble, there's no inventory or anything..). Going in each direction for a little while you realize the space is rather limited, but feels bigger since it's sooo empty.

And that's pretty much it.

What is it trying to say ? No clue.
What would be different if someone else was there for real ? No clue.
Is there any point to it ? No clue.
Is there more to be seen or experienced if you stick to it ? No clue. Was too bored to find out.
Does understanding French help at all? Absolutely not - native speaker here.

I did like the nighttime sky effects (time goes by when you close your eyes). That was about it.

So I really can't recommend it. Unless you're the type to go stare at a single blotch of paint on a white canvas at a museum and go "ooooooh, that's deep".
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97 of 171 people (57%) found this review helpful
115 people found this review funny
Not Recommended
1.0 hrs on record
Posted: September 26, 2014
A friend of mine gifted this to me for my birthday. He's not my friend anymore.
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12 of 15 people (80%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
1.6 hrs on record
Posted: March 24, 2013
I really enjoyed Dear Esther. I also enjoy Tale of Tales other games, like The Path. I simply do not understand nor enjoy this game at all. I went into it with low expectations and an open mind, I left questioning exactly what should be considered "art" in gaming.

Bientôt l'été is the most pretentious of pretentious indie art games. One that is "too deep for you" to even understand whatever trivial message it's trying to put across. Let me just say right now that when a developer needs to address their entire userbase in a forum post, revealing what their inspiration for the game was in order for you to understand its purpose, then the developer has completely failed to convey any sort of rational thought with their game. Still, no one slightly understands the purpose of Bientôt l'été and those who do are obviously elitist intellectuals whose thoughts and opinions on the matter are also "too deep for you" to understand yet again. It's hard not to call Poe's Law into play.

This game has a mechanical crutch which becomes limited by its users. The main attraction of Bientôt l'été is being able to connect with other players in a cafe of sorts, decked out with a chess board, a glass of wine, cigarettes, and the ability to communicate intricately with one another. Except this all falls apart when you realise you're the sole person in existence to be playing this game at this point in time, forcing you to instead substitute a human presence with artificial intelligence. This severely impacts the game as a whole.

I never found a partner to play with so I had to resort to A.I., and after collecting all of the chess pieces I managed to find a gun... although my character holds it backwards. Does this gun do anything more than intimidate the opposing player? If not, then there is no point to this game since there aren't enough people playing this game at any one time; you can't really surprise artificial intelligence.

The entire process of Bientôt l'été took me little over 80 minutes to achieve. After collecting the gun and positioning all the chess pieces in their correct order, hoping for something to "unlock" or tell me I've done something right, only to find out nothing much happens. I decided to go back out and collect more items, coming to a stinging realisation that the cycle has restarted and I'm collecting the very first chess pieces again.

This game is insulting.
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15 of 21 people (71%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
0.2 hrs on record
Posted: June 7, 2014
For the record, I have played this game, but for some reason Steam isn't showing my actual time put into it.

"A work of art"

Yes, I have to admit that Bientôt l'été was indeed a work of art. But that's the exact reason this game is practically unplayable. I gave it a little while, hoping to get somewhere, but instead I just sat there and played chess while rereading the same dialogue over and over. I don't know whether this game gets more interesting or enjoyable later on, but from what I have played, I can tell you that I'm glad I bought this during last year's Summer Sale, because for $9.99, Bientôt l'été shouldn't be payed for until it goes on sale... between 80-100% off.
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25 of 40 people (63%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
0.2 hrs on record
Posted: August 15, 2013
Bientot L'Ete can be considered art. But, it's not. Its interface is clumsy, the graphics are passable, the sounds ok, the gameplay non-existant, the controls poor and the story alright. It's an interesting idea that is poorly executed. I had no pleasure playing (experiencing ?) it.
If you really want to play a Tale Of Tales game play The Path instead. That one's certainly more enjoyable than this piece of crap. Otherwise just stay away from it and go play something decent.

[Rating: 52/100]
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23 of 37 people (62%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
Recommended
5.3 hrs on record
Posted: April 18, 2014
Short:
+ Relaxing "walking simulator"
+ Eerie, dreamy, surreal, transcendental design, music and ambiance
+ Bold multiplayer concept: People are strangers, no direct means of communication

- Lack of any significant, forward-driven narration/story/plot
- Lack of any significant, long-term gameplay
- Odd/Awkward, not exactly comforting (keyboard) controls
- Multiplayer barely works for the lack of people playing this game (workaround: joining Steam group and timing online time with other people)

Long:
Interesting from an art-ish and ambiance-related point of view, lacking gameplay-wise, and with an irritating control scheme.

Badmouths may call it a boring walking simulator. It provides less exploration and narration than for example Dear Esther, but a bit more than for example Proteus, and has it's own unique graphical style and ambiance. The graphics, sounds and music give you an eerie feeling, it's dream-like, surreal and transcendental, and for this alone it's interesting to look at and listen to, eventually even admirable.

You select a male or female character stored inside tubes. "It's nearly summer" you are told. You appear with your character on a simulated/virtual beach shore and walk it. Random phrases will appear drawn onto the ground. You "collect" ("remember) some of them by closing your eyes, you also hear them voiced in French then (they are always subtitled in the language of your choice). You collect some object "hidden" beneath some worldly, "holographic" thing (a tree, a bush, a crane, ...) that disappears to reveal this object (chess pieces mostly, and one more unique and confusing one which leaves room for interpretation). You enter a house, meet with a virtual partner of the opposite gender in some sort of bar, put your objects in turns on a chessboard (freely, you don't actually play chess - some spots trigger the words/phrases you previously collected to appear on the screen and be voiced), take a smoke, drink some whine or select some pre-set of music tracks to play music-box like in the background. The lines you collect and make appear are circling around the two characters and their relationship, who are or used to be lovers After that you leave the house, walk along the shore again, collect more phrases and another object and enter the house again. This you repeat as many times as you wish, at some point the simulation starts over again with you collecting about the same pieces again (the game however seems to remember all pieces you once collected - I've just started up the game again and could place all the objects I once picked up many months back when I first played this game).

The partner in the house is either A.I.-controlled or an actual human who is playing the game at the same time as you do. You don't see his/her name, he/she is a stranger, there is no text or voice chat to use, you only communicate with the words and through symbolism you can do with the chessboard and the objects, and the only indication whether there is someone else playing/waiting in the house is - from what I've been told and noticed - a window you see from the outside that has lights on. I haven't been able to meet up with a real human yet, because either the mechanics to match you up with one are not working too well or this game was never played by too many people to begin with. There is a Steam group one can join, and sometimes people try to group up through it. However this is a bit of a misleading way of playing this game, since it was obviously intended to meet strangers, an idea Tale of Tales originally came up with in "The Endless Forest", but which isn't executed too well in this game. A game that did this better was the PSN game "Journey". But I guess one must probably consider that "Journey" was a larger success than any of Tale of Tales' games ever were - the more players play these games the higher/better the chances to meet up with them. At some point no one will play these anymore, I guess, not even "Journey".

The control scheme isn't entirely bad but not exactly too enjoyable. This is a problem I keep seeing in the games made by Tale of Tales. You look around by moving the mouse to either side of the screen, you walk by holding down the left mouse button, you close your eyes with the right mouse button and run with spacebar. It feels odd/awkward and not very comforting. They could adapt to the more classic control schemes that games with a first- and third-person view give you, the usual WASD and mouse-look thing. I don't see any good reason in doing things differently there. Has it to do with being different for the sake of being different? Or are they inept and don't play their own games? I don't know, and I don't like being harsher to them than they deserve. You can play with a gamepad too, maybe I should try that and will feel better then.
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19 of 30 people (63%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
0.3 hrs on record
Posted: November 2, 2014
Couldn't play with my friend - the netcode didn't work. Overall a boring, pretentious game.
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13 of 20 people (65%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
1.1 hrs on record
Posted: July 12, 2014
I never understod this game. I watched and read reviews about this game so maybe I could be able to do so. I played it, and I was really excited about giving it a try, but after some time.. I became hopeless. So here is what I think the porpuse of the game was:
*Since it is a walk simulator (and I'm not very familiar with them) I found some kind of peace but the lack of communication/interaction made me feel awkward and very dissapointed since the multiplayer option never worked for me. - you might find peace but in a weird way.
*The story... doesn't even have one. - maybe that's what the game wants you to do, to build/imagine your own. (then you better read a book or play Minecraft, or something like that).
*Music is okay and it indeed relaxes you but there's always something else that relaxes you.
*The controls.. arghh... just terrible.

<<Games like Lifeless Planet and Proteus have much more to offer, they lead you where they want to, and they indeed give you different feelings such as fear or excitement, Bientôt l'été gives you freedom, gives you a choice.. but after that, nothing gets to happen>>

(If you still want to try it) Buy it on sale, or never buy it at all.
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10 of 15 people (67%) found this review helpful
Recommended
0.4 hrs on record
Posted: August 19, 2015
Honestly I'm mixed about this. I think its very cool and experimental for that hipster side of me that wants games to be something more than what they are in appearance, something deeper but I think this is a little too abstract. Its... different.

I don't know what this is. I'm not sure its supposed to be.. well, anything. Its just a thing. You can engage with it I suppose. You're just supposed to explore it seems.

The game gives you some hints on controls and guides you in a subjectively meaningful way IF you close your eyes. You'll figure it out. This is definetly one of those experimental games or... interactive art? I guess. Sticky subject regarding words these days.

I'll leave you with some thoughts I had while playing. Possible interpretations. An elaborate ruse to obfuscate that in life when you close your eyes you can move faster but we are still trapped?

My favorite thought I had however was a French sentient robot stuck in their own programming in love with itself as two separate beings.

This is definitely one to ponder about. If you're one of those so called “intellectuals” Otherwise, you just walk real slowly on a beach for awhile.
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7 of 10 people (70%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
0.1 hrs on record
Posted: July 8, 2014
If you want a very foreign feeling game that is as pointless as all those bad french jokes americans use. Buy this game.
Beautiful ethereal music score. Still have no clue what I was doing.

If you want a foreign game that makes more sense and has an end, but is very very foreign, go get "The Void".
It's russian.
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11 of 18 people (61%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
Recommended
1.5 hrs on record
Posted: February 6, 2013
As many players of Bientôt l'été I encountered the artificial intelligence and was unable to best its application of post-structural linguistics. At every turn I found myself subjected to a dialog that was profoundly disturbing, of which if I am to understand Lacanian psychoanalysis properly, came to enjoy as a manner and extension of the game.

After this realization I came to wonder, and eventually resolved, why it was that I found this game so unmatched in its presentation -- it is what constitutes the substance ontology of a cosmopolitan bourgeoisie.

On an ephemeral beach they engage in this digital discourse, aimlessly embodying the transcendental human experience, exclaiming to themselves "This is what interaction amounts to; a game theory of chess and the parries of regular 21st century parlance and nomenclature." Smug and content the player makes a category error in assuming that this is "beyond" or too "meta" for the proletarian mind.

From here we see that indeed, this game is the ontological groundwork of a cosmopolitan bourgeois character.
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4 of 5 people (80%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
0.4 hrs on record
Posted: August 7, 2013
Once again, Tale of Tales gets a recommendation from me for you to NOT buy this game. Stick to Journey if you want to experience anything that this game does that even approaches interesting, as Journey did that particular aspect more meaningfully, and in a more engaging way. Yet again, they have a clunky, awkward, even painful interface. Yet again, they seem to make the act of discovery as boring and disappointing as possible. Yet again, they seem to approach emotion like some inhuman creature who thinks of our species as idiots. Tale of Tales just tries too hard to be some caricature of artistic in a desperate plea for respect. A plea that has been going on for over a decade without results.
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14 of 25 people (56%) found this review helpful
3 people found this review funny
Not Recommended
1.3 hrs on record
Posted: February 9, 2013
Bean Toilet
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4 of 6 people (67%) found this review helpful
Not Recommended
1.2 hrs on record
Posted: January 26, 2014
This was better when I had the sound turned off. It felt like a survival horror game where I was trapped in some box with an ethereal stalker talking to me from affar.

Then I went inside. We talked about love and the weather. I drank and smoked a lot. He told me to die. I I told him I had no desire to return. When I tried to return to the 'cafe' the game crashed. I'm okay with this.

I think this was part of a humble bundle. I hope this was part of a humble bundle. I would hate to think I spent money specifically on this game.
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