Long, long ago, there was an ancient kingdom called Ys which prospered under the auspices of two heavenly Goddesses. Over time, the kingdom came to be known as Esteria, and its divine history was largely forgotten by all but the descendants of those who once preached the Goddesses’ will.
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Very Positive (15 reviews) - 100% of the 15 user reviews in the last 30 days are positive.
Overall:
Very Positive (823 reviews) - 87% of the 823 user reviews for this game are positive.
Release Date: Feb 14, 2013

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About This Game

Long, long ago, there was an ancient kingdom called Ys which prospered under the auspices of two heavenly Goddesses. Over time, the kingdom came to be known as Esteria, and its divine history was largely forgotten by all but the descendants of those who once preached the Goddesses’ will. The only reminder of this lost lore was a cursed spire at the foot of a giant crater, which locals came to regard as “The Devil’s Tower.”


Eventually, the men and women who called Esteria their home began mining a uniquely radiant silver from the nearby mountains, and development boomed. Towns were built, and the land became rich with life.


Then, all at once, monsters began to appear. Only a few at first – but soon enough, the land was swarming with them, and the Esterians had no choice but to hide in fear, remaining ever vigilant just to stay alive.


Our story begins with a young man who’d heard rumors of these misfortunes, and strove to verify them with his own eyes; a brave swordsman with an adventurous spirit bolstered by his own youthful naiveté.


His name was Adol Christin.

With no regard for his own safety, Adol set sail toward Esteria through a heretofore impassable barrier of neverending storms. There, he was destined to become ensconced within a 700 year-old mystery that would ultimately take him to a long-lost land nestled amongst the clouds...

Ys I & II Chronicles+ is the most modernized and up-to-date remake of Falcom’s classic franchise-spawning action RPGs from 1987 and 1988. Come see how the story began, and witness the birth of a legend!

Key Features

  • Classic buttonless “bump” combat receives a full analog-enabled upgrade for gamepad users, and is augmented in Ys II by a robust magic system.
  • Soundtrack selectable from among the original 80s FM-synth, an early 2000s MIDI-style remix or a modern studio performance by Falcom’s in-house rock band.
  • Character art selectable from 90s-style portraits or more modern anime designs.
  • Four selectable difficulty levels and optional boss rush mode grant players a true old-school challenge (if desired).
  • Transform into a demon to speak with any and every standard enemy in the game, creating unparalleled depth that still impresses even to this day. (Ys II only)
  • Unique Steam Achievements plus Steam Cloud support and leaderboards.
  • Adjustable high-resolution PC graphics with a smooth, consistent framerate.
  • Greater viewing area than in previously-available Ys I & II Chronicles editions.
  • Decorative screen frames available from the earlier Japan-only Ys I & II Complete PC release, in addition to the more modernized full-screen viewport of previous Ys I & II Chronicles editions.

System Requirements

    Minimum:
    • OS:Windows XP
    • Processor:Pentium III 866 MHz
    • Memory:1 GB RAM
    • Graphics:64 MB VRAM, 3D accelerator compatible w/ DirectX 9.0c
    • DirectX®:9.0c
    • Hard Drive:2 GB HD space
    • Sound:Compatible with DirectX 9.0c
    Recommended:
    • OS:Windows XP, Vista, 7 (64-bit supported)
    • Processor:Pentium III 1.6 GHz or higher
    • Memory:2 GB RAM
    • Graphics:64 MB VRAM, 3D accelerator compatible w/ DirectX 9.0c
    • DirectX®:9.0c
    • Hard Drive:3 GB HD space
    • Sound:Compatible with DirectX 9.0c
Customer reviews
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Recent:
Very Positive (15 reviews)
Overall:
Very Positive (823 reviews)
Recently Posted
Luisfius
0.2 hrs
Posted: August 26
bump into things simulator.


Really good music. Fun game. Comes with two versions, I do not remember if either comes with the kicking rad Turbografx16 or whatever redbook audio soundtrack but yeah, fun game.

Maybe I should eventually replay it, but eh, whatever.

Edit: Comes with BOTH Ys 1 and Ys2, under different dang listings on the library.
Definitely a great deal. Ys 2 is fantastic as well.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
15.4 hrs
Posted: August 21
At first when i started this game i was confused and not sure how it would go. But after finishing it. I find myself with a sense of completion compare to others games before. The music is very RPG-ish so the normal. The graphics are great in my opinion and the game play is minimalist but straight to the point. It was a refreshing experience. I am sure others will enjoy it.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Kabosky
10.3 hrs
Posted: August 18
I'm playing the Ys series, but I started from Origins and I was not expecting a difference between Origins and 1. The combat system is what's the big difference between the two because Origins goes with a press this button to attack, but Ys I uses the bash system. The bash system mainly is running into the enemy to attack, but for them to not attack, you would have to hit them at an angle and not head on.

Once you get the combat system down, the game is very enjoyable and coming from Origins, I expected the boss fights to be a challenge. I'll spoil this now because I'm thinking about it, but after 1/4th into the game, money is literally useless. You'll find all the better gear as you explore into the game more and it makes the shops unnecessary to go to anymore.

The game was a lot of fun, and was fairly short to beat so I would look into a sale in this game if you're looking to buy it.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
interesting 0utput
5.1 hrs
Posted: August 17
This is a full version of Ys I & II as it was released on early machines, with a visual and audible modernisation "glaze", both which can be reverted to the original format if you so wish.

This game chronicles the beginnings of Adol, a recurring protagonist of the Ys series that starts 700 years after Ys Origin. Most of the two games surround one of the main 'evils' encountered, which manifest in two forms -- one at the end of each game.

Combat in Ys I & II is awkward at the beginning, as it involves Adol bumping into enemies to attack them. To prevent return damage, he has to bump off-center or at the side. This eliminates the need of button-mashing and simplifies grinding -- even more so in Ys II. The audio is perfect for the two games.

Overall, what you are getting is the original experience, not some rework treatment like Ys: Oath in Felghana -- but these two games stand alone for its simplicity and engaging storyline.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
SmoKing* :: SLR
33.7 hrs
Posted: August 17
The nightmare mode was quite challenging, but that just made this game more fun to play :)
Helpful? Yes No Funny
The Pr0tagonist
14.7 hrs
Posted: August 14
This game fun and chanlenging and holds up exstreamly well. Notice I'll keep saying game beacuse this "collection" is really 1 game that when it origanaly came out they had to split it in two it verry much fells like 1 great game. Every pice of equipment you pick up is basicly neccary to continue and ys1 brillently makes you max out your level half way through the game so you can no longer grind and have to get gud.

If you haven't played a ys (I have only played this and orgin so far I'm onto 3 next) one thing you should know is that it's an action game with slight rpg elements and world. The clear foccous of the game is quick stressful battles. most bosses can be taken down in under a minute or two but on the nightmare difficulty you need to be close to perfect in your exicution or you will die quickly. That goes for the rest of the game as well a small mistake can quickly end in your death you'll need to keep saving in order to get through this but it keeps the game exciting from biging to end. It also has the darksouls feeling of you felling epic when you have to back through an area that you were stuggling with earlier when you relize not much has changed but your skill.

The only complaint I have is nightmare for ys one feels unfair on a couple of the end game bosses. Serisously I ignore most games if someone dosn't say they are hard. Ys 1 nighmare is not to be taken lightly and make sure you have v-sync enabled or the game can be unbeatable at the final boss. I wish I had done hard for ys1 and nightmare for ys2 I probably would have had a better experance. Also compaired to the rest of the game ys2 final boss feels like such a push over it's sad but I can't complin too much after every other boss being a blast and differnt from the rest.

Also keep in mind that the two games make up what you would expect to be and avrage game for this type of thing and 2 is verry much just a continuation of 1 maybe slightly better and feels more fair but still hard.

despite it being old you deffently get your $s worth at $15 and on a sale this is a steal.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
MTSolven
0.5 hrs
Posted: August 13
Feena!!!
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Shrike
12.7 hrs
Posted: August 10
I started this series with Ys Origin, so it took a while to get used to the bumper car combat. Instead of pressing a button, you walk into an enemy to attack. They do the same, so you need to hit them at an angle or toward the side to deal damage without trading. This allows some silly situations like pushing smaller enemies against a wall to lock them while Adol goes nuts with the dps. It takes getting used to, but I've enjoyed seeing what the bosses are like, especially since the Origin bosses are remakes of these original ones. These bosses are MUCH simpler than the later entries, but it's been fun just comparing how they were implemented.

Play if you like Ys, especially if you've ever wanted to play bumper cars with a giant centipede doing donuts... In a game other than Legend of Zelda: Link to the Past.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
shrimp
11.9 hrs
Posted: August 8
AaaaaaaAaaaaAAAAAa SO Yummy Hungry…あぁぁぁぁぁぁGAGAGAGAGAGAっがaaaaaaa
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Chirpy13
9.0 hrs
Posted: August 7
Ys I & II Chronicles is a much improved remake of the 1987/1988 Falcom games for the NEC PC88 and PC98 computers. The two games are essentially one, with II being a direct sequel to I. Unlike most Ys games, where the events are loosely connected and don't need to be played in any particular order, Ys I and II should be played together, in order. I also personally recommend these games as an introduction to the series, as they introduce some of the main recurring characters of the series. Both games come with 3 soundtracks - the original PC88 version, the Ys I & II Complete version, and the Ys I & II Chronicles version. While I personally have a love for the FM synth of the original (PC98 VGM is amazing), all 3 soundtracks are fantastic and there's really no "best" version. Having multiple choices was a very nice touch from Falcom. With introductions out of the way though, let's get into the individual games.

- Ys I -
Ys I is a mediocre game with an odd charm. While not nearly as good as its sequel, it's still a nice game. Much of the time there's little clue where to go or what to do, but something about freely roaming the world talking to NPCs to find a clue as to what to do next reminds me of a simpler time and just has a nice feeling to it. Also, unlike many RPGs, every NPC has a name and a small sense of uniqueness that makes the interactions with them more enjoyable. This is honestly one of my favorite parts of this game, and of Falcom games in general.

The combat is pretty simplistic in Ys - bumping into enemies will damage them, but hitting them head-on will hurt you a lot as well, so you must hit them from off-center to avoid taking damage. It's a nice system, and I like it, but it wasn't executed as well as it could have been in this game. You reach the maximum level about halfway through the game, which makes fighting enemies feel unrewarding for the remainder. The boss design also a bit poor, which is sad. They're functional and not really "bad", but they're still some of the poorer-quality bosses of the series. That said, while the gameplay is a touch mediocre, the characters, story, and music still work well to make the game feel nice despite its flaws.

- Ys II -

Ys II is the direct sequel to Ys I, taking place immediately after the events of its prequel. This game takes everything that made Ys I good, and makes it better. Then it takes everything that was bad about Ys I, and makes it good. The game's progression feels so much smoother and more straight-forward than the first, and the combat system has been improved by adding magic to the mix. Early in the game, Adol will gain access to his first spell, a chargable fireball spell, giving more choice in combat alongside the traditional bump-combat. The boss design has also stepped up from mediocre to magnificent. Ys II's bosses are very much up to par with the later installments of the series, and are by far the best of the 2d games. Most bosses can only be damaged by the fireballs, giving them a shoot-em-up type feel, where you must dodge their attacks while shooting them with your charged up fireballs. Also, unlike the first game, Adol will level up continually throughout the entire game, and experience gains are now adjusted relative to the difference in levels from enemies, helping to keep the player from being over or under leveled. There's also lots of small touches to the game that add so much to it, such as being able to give gifts to NPCs for additional dialogues or other small secrets. Ys II is a fantastic game and one of the best in the series, definitely standing up well alongside its 3d successors. I highly recommend it.
Helpful? Yes No Funny
Most Helpful Reviews  In the past 30 days
2 of 2 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
12.7 hrs on record
Posted: August 10
I started this series with Ys Origin, so it took a while to get used to the bumper car combat. Instead of pressing a button, you walk into an enemy to attack. They do the same, so you need to hit them at an angle or toward the side to deal damage without trading. This allows some silly situations like pushing smaller enemies against a wall to lock them while Adol goes nuts with the dps. It takes getting used to, but I've enjoyed seeing what the bosses are like, especially since the Origin bosses are remakes of these original ones. These bosses are MUCH simpler than the later entries, but it's been fun just comparing how they were implemented.

Play if you like Ys, especially if you've ever wanted to play bumper cars with a giant centipede doing donuts... In a game other than Legend of Zelda: Link to the Past.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
2 of 2 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
0.2 hrs on record
Posted: August 26
bump into things simulator.


Really good music. Fun game. Comes with two versions, I do not remember if either comes with the kicking rad Turbografx16 or whatever redbook audio soundtrack but yeah, fun game.

Maybe I should eventually replay it, but eh, whatever.

Edit: Comes with BOTH Ys 1 and Ys2, under different dang listings on the library.
Definitely a great deal. Ys 2 is fantastic as well.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
9.0 hrs on record
Posted: August 7
Ys I & II Chronicles is a much improved remake of the 1987/1988 Falcom games for the NEC PC88 and PC98 computers. The two games are essentially one, with II being a direct sequel to I. Unlike most Ys games, where the events are loosely connected and don't need to be played in any particular order, Ys I and II should be played together, in order. I also personally recommend these games as an introduction to the series, as they introduce some of the main recurring characters of the series. Both games come with 3 soundtracks - the original PC88 version, the Ys I & II Complete version, and the Ys I & II Chronicles version. While I personally have a love for the FM synth of the original (PC98 VGM is amazing), all 3 soundtracks are fantastic and there's really no "best" version. Having multiple choices was a very nice touch from Falcom. With introductions out of the way though, let's get into the individual games.

- Ys I -
Ys I is a mediocre game with an odd charm. While not nearly as good as its sequel, it's still a nice game. Much of the time there's little clue where to go or what to do, but something about freely roaming the world talking to NPCs to find a clue as to what to do next reminds me of a simpler time and just has a nice feeling to it. Also, unlike many RPGs, every NPC has a name and a small sense of uniqueness that makes the interactions with them more enjoyable. This is honestly one of my favorite parts of this game, and of Falcom games in general.

The combat is pretty simplistic in Ys - bumping into enemies will damage them, but hitting them head-on will hurt you a lot as well, so you must hit them from off-center to avoid taking damage. It's a nice system, and I like it, but it wasn't executed as well as it could have been in this game. You reach the maximum level about halfway through the game, which makes fighting enemies feel unrewarding for the remainder. The boss design also a bit poor, which is sad. They're functional and not really "bad", but they're still some of the poorer-quality bosses of the series. That said, while the gameplay is a touch mediocre, the characters, story, and music still work well to make the game feel nice despite its flaws.

- Ys II -

Ys II is the direct sequel to Ys I, taking place immediately after the events of its prequel. This game takes everything that made Ys I good, and makes it better. Then it takes everything that was bad about Ys I, and makes it good. The game's progression feels so much smoother and more straight-forward than the first, and the combat system has been improved by adding magic to the mix. Early in the game, Adol will gain access to his first spell, a chargable fireball spell, giving more choice in combat alongside the traditional bump-combat. The boss design has also stepped up from mediocre to magnificent. Ys II's bosses are very much up to par with the later installments of the series, and are by far the best of the 2d games. Most bosses can only be damaged by the fireballs, giving them a shoot-em-up type feel, where you must dodge their attacks while shooting them with your charged up fireballs. Also, unlike the first game, Adol will level up continually throughout the entire game, and experience gains are now adjusted relative to the difference in levels from enemies, helping to keep the player from being over or under leveled. There's also lots of small touches to the game that add so much to it, such as being able to give gifts to NPCs for additional dialogues or other small secrets. Ys II is a fantastic game and one of the best in the series, definitely standing up well alongside its 3d successors. I highly recommend it.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
Recommended
5.1 hrs on record
Posted: August 17
This is a full version of Ys I & II as it was released on early machines, with a visual and audible modernisation "glaze", both which can be reverted to the original format if you so wish.

This game chronicles the beginnings of Adol, a recurring protagonist of the Ys series that starts 700 years after Ys Origin. Most of the two games surround one of the main 'evils' encountered, which manifest in two forms -- one at the end of each game.

Combat in Ys I & II is awkward at the beginning, as it involves Adol bumping into enemies to attack them. To prevent return damage, he has to bump off-center or at the side. This eliminates the need of button-mashing and simplifies grinding -- even more so in Ys II. The audio is perfect for the two games.

Overall, what you are getting is the original experience, not some rework treatment like Ys: Oath in Felghana -- but these two games stand alone for its simplicity and engaging storyline.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
2 of 3 people (67%) found this review helpful
Recommended
11.9 hrs on record
Posted: August 8
AaaaaaaAaaaaAAAAAa SO Yummy Hungry…あぁぁぁぁぁぁGAGAGAGAGAGAっがaaaaaaa
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
Most Helpful Reviews  Overall
90 of 93 people (97%) found this review helpful
17 people found this review funny
Recommended
34.9 hrs on record
Posted: November 26, 2015
Useless bit of trivia first.

The amount of times these games have been redone is truly mindblowing, but then again Ys has been around since 1987. What we have here is an enhanced port of a PSP port of an enhanced edition of a windows remake of a combined turbografx-16/pc-engine remake of a pair of games on an ancient japanese pc. Rolls right off the tongue and I'm not even gonna get into how many ports the original games themselves got. I'm fairly certain this won't be the last remake either.

Now that I got that bit of nonsence out of the way let's move on to the review.

Story

The island of Esteria which is known for its trade in silver has been cut off from mainland Europe by a phenomenon called the stormwall for the last six months. Enter Adol Christin, a 17 year old young man with a passion for adventure and measuring women and little boys. He sails to Esteria from the port town of Promarock (or Promalock depending on the translation) but his boat gets caught in the stormwall and he shipwrecks off the coast of the island. He is found by villagers and taken to the nearby town's clinic. This is where the game starts. From here on cue battles with monsters, ancient civilizations, saving the world and the usual business when it comes to JRPGs.

Overall the story is not a groundbreaking epic that will shock you with amazing plot twists, but it is really well written and will suck you in if you take your time with it. Even the most trivial NPCs usually have something new and interesting to say as the story moves forward (this is something Nihon Falcom does a lot). Ys II takes place immediately after Ys I, so my recommendation is to play both games in one go. There's also a bit of humour added by XSEED which fits quite well since it's put in the right places and doesn't feel forced.

muh grafix

If you've read the nonsence at the top or looked at the screenshots you should already know what to expect in terms of graphics. Enhancements or not you're looking at slightly improved visuals from a 1997 Windows game. That said Chronicles does have a nifty feature where you can pick from the original PC interface or the PSP one as well as picking between the original late 90s anime artstyle or the more modern artstyle for the character portraits. That's all there is to be said about the graphics, wether you like them or not is up to you, but I wouldn't judge the game based on looks alone.

PS: There is no FPS lock, so stop whining, you babies.

Music

INCREDIBLY BIASED OPINION INCOMING
As far as I'm concerned Falcom Sound Team JDK are musical gods and I'll fight anyone who says otherwise.

With that out of the way, you have the option to pick from three different renditions of the soundtrack in the options menu (or just mod in whatever the hell you want because PC). The original PC-88 soundtrack from 1987, the PC Complete soundtrack from 2001 or the new Chronicles soundtrack from 2009. All three are great, though which one you go with depends on you. My personal recommendation is to mod the turbografx-16 audio in and enjoy one of the best versions of the soundtrack (why they never bothered to use it again is beyond me), some dude posted a mod for both games on the forums, you can find it if you look around.

Long story short: Music is 11/10.

Gameplay

While the rest of the games in the series are more traditional in terms of combat, Ys I & II are more of an acquired taste. The reason for this is because unlike most action RPGs at the time here you don't press a button to attack enemies. Instead you ram into them (slightly off center), that's it. In Ys II you get some spells which allow you to attack at range but the meat of the combat is once again dryhumping things with your sword (hence why a lot of people call it the bumper cars system).

Personally I wouldn't call the lack of an attack button a bad thing since in this case it makes the combat LIGHTNING FAST. I'm not even joking, you'll be murdering masses of monsters with such rapid speed it'll make someone like Guts look like a pansy in comparison (you don't mess with Adol Christin, the guy's a walking apocalypse). It also makes the usual grinding in JRPGs almost nonexistant which for me is a plus. I don't hate it mind you, but it gets stale fast if the game relies on it too much. Anyway on normal difficulty you'll be swimming in cash and exp before you know it.

The boss battles are the highlight of the series. In Ys I they are mostly hit and miss. Some are really good and there are others like Vagullion aka THAT !@(*$^ BAT and Dark Fact known as Dalk Fukt in Japan (if you manage beat him on nightmare mode you have the full right to rub that in everyone's faces because you earned it). Things get much better in Ys II, but it's also the better game. Ys I is essentially a glorified prologue but you shouldn't skip it since you'll miss half the story.

TL;DR

This is where the Ys series started from. The games are great but they are not for everyone. However if you do try them out and end up liking them you'll be in for one hell of a ride you won't soon forget.
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88 of 100 people (88%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
Recommended
13.5 hrs on record
Posted: November 25, 2013
Ys I is a simple, fast-paced action game disguised as an RPG. Maybe too simple for a generation who're used to combo systems, collecting a dozen new abilities, and other new hot features adopted by the genre (and later games in the series). But I like that simplicity! It's a comfortable old friend of a game, with just enough interesting use of its one mechanic (ram the other guy off-center) to last the duration of the adventure.

And then you can play Ys II, which throws in a bunch more toys to play with in a larger world!

Make sure you play in the original 4:3 mode: the zoomed-in mode doesn't quite match the aspect ratio of the original game window, and areas designed around it will feel cramped if you have to scroll more.
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59 of 68 people (87%) found this review helpful
2 people found this review funny
Recommended
56.3 hrs on record
Posted: May 2, 2015
Ys I & II, being the first two games in the long-running Ys series, have had quite a number of releases over the years. It’s hit a number of different platforms, including the PC88, TurboGrafx, PC, Nintendo DS, Sony PSP, and now PC, each with their own tweaks to the game to fit the platform they were released on. XSEED Games and Falcom, who started their partnership with the release of Ys Seven, have set out on bringing the definitive version of Ys I & II to the PC. The question is, how does this port in the long list of existing ports fare?

Originally released in the late 1980s, Ys I & II definitely shows their roots in their story presentations. You play the role of Adol Christin, a (now very well-known) red-haired adventurer who sets off on a journey of excitement and ends up washing up in a nearby coastal city where he learns of demon attacks which are driving the country’s citizens into hiding. As you progress through the game, it becomes clear that things aren’t as simple as they seem, with items called the Books of Ys being collected as you progress through your journey. These later become important to unraveling exactly what is causing this country’s plight and showing how to set things right.

Most memorable for its combat, Ys I and II combine all the elements of a traditional JRPG: towns, shops, NPCs, equipment, character levels, exploration, and even some minor side quests and secrets. Ys I is more simplistic than its sequel, but both games are strikingly similar and tell two parts of the same narrative, even if those parts are two nearly identical story arcs. Each game can be beaten in less than ten hours, both have moments of great frustration, and they both climax in thrilling and memorable bosses. Ys I and II may be most well known for their shared "bump" combat system in which our hero Adol collides with enemies to injure them (and to be injured by them). The lack of an attack button and Adol's swift running speed make the action so frantic as to be absurd, and at times I found the red-haired sprite's action downright hilarious. I was skeptical and critical at first, but I learned to enjoy the simple combat, particularly during boss fights, which require much more thought than the dull standard enemies. Unfortunately, diagonal attacks are so overpowered in Ys II that regular enemies are slain with ease, and both games suffer from clumsy menus and balance issues.

Being that this is an older RPG, there are some grinding issues present in this release. Ys I, being merely a prelude to Ys II, only allows for Adol to level up to Level 10. Levels control whether you win or lose in Ys I, and at times you’ll have to grind in the initial dungeons to get through some of the bosses. This issue becomes a bit worse in Ys II, which ups the level cap to 55, but lessens the EXP gained from enemies as you level up. This requires players to, at times, spend time farming enemies in one area of a dungeon, lest they get instantly killed by enemies in a later part which Adol can’t touch with gaining more levels and grabbing enough gold to get the best weapons for that period in the game. Some of the latter bosses are particularly unfair in this regard, forcing players to gain 3-5 levels above what the enemies are at just to get through the boss fight with a sliver of life remaining. While this only occurs in a few parts of the game, it’s still an annoyance that could have been fixed with a few slight tweaks by Falcom for this release. Players who enjoy a challenge will find no problems with this though.

As both titles were released back in the 1980s, the RPG mantra of including key items in obscure places holds true. Numerous times in Ys I players will be unable to progress through the story because they forgot to talk to or walk into a specific story event that was either barely mentioned or not mentioned at all. While Ys II fixes this for the most part, there’s one key item in one of the final dungeons which requires players to go to a unmentioned room instead of a house in town, which is where players would assume it was located due to the game’s dialogue. The game could have greatly benefited from some streamlining for newer fans of the series.

Even with those negatives, as with most Ys titles, the first thing players will notice is the game’s soundtrack, which like in Oath and Seven, runs circles around most other games. The soundtrack, composed by video game music legend Yuzo Koshiro of Etrian Odyssey fame, along with Falcom stalwart Mieko Ishikawa, is easily the shining gem of this compilation. As explain before, Ys I & II have appeared on numerous platforms in the past, so the game compliments this by allowing players to choose between three different versions of the music.

One of the most impressive parts of Ys Chronicles outside of the soundtrack has to be the game’s storyline and translation. For a title which was released back in the 1980s, the story still stands shoulders above many other titles of that era, as well as some of the RPG hits of the 1990s. This combined with the music and the general artistic presentation of the game makes for some very heartwarming moments. The main storyline was translated in a way which feels authentic without falling into the “ye olde” trap that most remakes of classic RPGs fall into. XSEED also threw in a couple pop culture jokes in some of the more obscure areas of the game for those who take the time to check out everything.

Despite some of the negatives I've listed here, I thoroughly enjoy playing through these adventures. Being a long time Ys fan I owed it to myself to play the adventures that started them all. There is magic in Ys, and everyone should get a chance to see it.

Highly Recommended

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49 of 59 people (83%) found this review helpful
Recommended
14.1 hrs on record
Posted: September 11, 2013
Another remake of the old Nihon Falcom action RPG classic, which finally brings this great game to english speaking PC gamers.

This version seems to improve everything beyond the previous versions (at least the ones I played, that is the Sega Master System version from the early 90s and the Turbo Duo release from a few years later), with one exception - it doesn't have voice acting, unlike the Turbo Duo release, which did have some (not much, but still...).

The control is great, the graphics are up-to-date, and the awesome soundtrack is at its best, as usual. The game is relatively short (8-10 hours if you've beat it before, but could take much longer for first timers), but offers plenty of fun.

This is really one of my favorite games.
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Recommended
20.5 hrs on record
Posted: November 19, 2014
This game has one of the hardest boss of all time Dark Fact. Dark Fact has no mercy to the weak soul. If you are a fan of the JRPG genre this is a must have to your collection. And if you are a hardcore gamer, Dark Fact is waiting for you.
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