Alone in space, light years away from your family, armed with only your Fistcannon™; you are Cargo Corps' latest recruit, a Cargo Commander.
User reviews:
Overall:
Very Positive (657 reviews) - 84% of the 657 user reviews for this game are positive.
Release Date: Nov 1, 2012

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About This Game

Alone in space, light years away from your family, armed with only your Fistcannon™, Platform Drill and the meanest cup of coffee in the sector; you are Cargo Corps’ latest recruit, a Cargo Commander.
Your responsibilities are simple: travel through the vast reaches of wormhole-filled space salvaging priceless cargo from alien infested containers. The work, however, is hard, honest, and hairy:punch and shoot deadly mutants in the face, while traveling between your ship and containers. Jockey for promotions with thousands of other Cargo Commanders in the galaxy, collect over 80 different cargo types, all the while earning your way back home.

Key Features

  • Randomly generated levels based around names. Choose any name to generate a new custom sector and share with your friends to compete for high score!
  • Fully destructible environments; create your own path with your Platform drill and explosives
  • Compete with other players for promotions; each sector has an online leaderboard
  • 2 different play modes: Career and Journey
  • Loot the dead corpses of other players' vain attempts at beating your score
  • Upgradeable weapons and tools

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
SteamOS + Linux
    • OS:Windows Vista/7
    • Processor:2 GHz (or 4 GHz for CPUs like Celeron/Duron)
    • Memory:2 GB RAM
    • Graphics:DirectX 9.0c compatible; integrated or very low budget cards may not work
    • DirectX®:9.0c
    • Hard Drive:200 MB HD space; 256 MB Video Memory
    • OS:Snow Leopard 10.6.3, or later
    • Memory:2 GB RAM
    • Graphics:OpenGL 2.0 compatible graphics card, 256 MB video memory
    • Hard Drive:200 MB HD space
    • OS: Ubuntu (and most other distributions
    • Processor: 2 GHz
    • Memory: 2 GB
    • Graphics: DirectX 9.0c/OpenGL 2.0 compatible graphics card, 256 MB video memory
    • Hard Drive: 200 MB space
Helpful customer reviews
17 of 19 people (89%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
3.4 hrs on record
Posted: February 1
Cargo Commander caught me totally off-guard. I was expecting something more traditional, with set levels and power-ups and some goofy story. What I got was a deceptively clever roguelike that started eating hours of my time, at least once I got over some rough patches.

You play an employee of Cargo Corp, sent off to the ♥♥♥-end of space in a boxy little junker of a ship to salvage equally junky boxes. Your ship is equipped with a magnet that, when activated, draws in a random assortment of giant space containers to smash into your ship and each other. Within these containers are the random bits of space junk Cargo Corp wants, along with enemies, hazards, and weapons to handle them. Connected containers usually have gaps to pass through where they collide, forming a rudimentary platforming level, but you can also drill through walls or spacewalk (as long as you can hold your breath) to get where you want to go.

Surviving enough waves of salvage gets you a container with a sector pass, which lets you travel to another area of space with different containers and salvage. Sectors are random based on their name, and the navigation system shows you popular systems, unpopular systems, systems your friends play, random systems, and even let you enter your own name to create a new one. It's a neat bit of continuity between players, further bolstered by the player corpses you can find and loot in heavily-trafficked sectors, and postcards from other players you can find randomly, or fill out and shoot into space if you find a blank one.

As far as gameplay goes, that's it. You call in waves of containers, loot them for cargo and resources to upgrade your dude (which reset for each sector), and get back to your ship before the "level" gets sucked back into space. There are basically two kinds of enemies in the game, melee monsters of varying size in the containers, and aggravating drill-squid things in space. You can find and upgrade a handful of weapons to deal with them, but combat is pretty thin and it's easy to get overwhelmed. The platforming isn't much better, with the random containers sometimes making regular exploring impossible and forcing you to drill out tons of walls or spacewalk around obnoxious areas.

With each sector essentially the same aside from items to find and container layouts, the game risks getting repetitive very quickly. I was about ready to punch out after 90 minutes or so... until I started paying attention to the story. Cargo Commander has a surprisingly dark, dystopian plot propping up the platforming, told through darkly funny emails from corporate and charming letters and packages from your family. As you tick off the the 88 different kinds of cargo to find, you rank up with the company, getting you new tools to speed up the process and maybe making progress towards getting home someday.

The whole package is far more compelling than I first thought, and I find myself returning to it whenever I have a free moment. The graphics are pretty basic indie 3D and the sound design works well enough, but it's the unique roguelike format married to an interesting world and story that keep it fresh. There are leaderboards for each sector and an endless mode to challenge if you need more variety, but even without those details Cargo Commander is worth digging into.
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7 of 7 people (100%) found this review helpful
2 people found this review funny
28.5 hrs on record
Posted: January 2
A fun little time waster that needs some time to get into. Can be a little rough around the edges but otherwise a well made game.

One con I can think of is the soundtrack, there are only two songs. One of the songs is catchy but after playing the game for awile that one song became stuck in my head and I could hear it when not playing the game.

Other than that I did enjoy the game.
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4 of 5 people (80%) found this review helpful
17.7 hrs on record
Posted: November 8, 2015
Nice Game. May have only played a few hours but I won't be forgetting it in a heart beat.
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2 of 2 people (100%) found this review helpful
9.8 hrs on record
Posted: March 7
Action packed, good atmosphere, very good for what it is.
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73 of 79 people (92%) found this review helpful
2 people found this review funny
17.6 hrs on record
Posted: August 24, 2015
AT A GLANCE
(Full review follows below)

  • Game Name: Cargo Commander
  • Original Release: 2012
  • Genre Tags: 2D; Rouge-Like; Random Generation; Action; Platformer; Sci-Fi
  • My Overall Grade: B
  • Estimated Playtime (Campaign): 15-25 hours
  • Multiplayer Aspect: None
  • Recommended To: Established fans of the genre; Those intrigued by the genre; Game atmosphere connoisseurs; Casual gamers

REVIEW
Cargo Commander is a simplistic, yet addictive, 2D-platformer with some interesting game mechanics. The game itself is relatively bare-boned, as it does not have many different enemies, weapons, or environments. What makes it an interesting game is the randomly-generated-world dynamic and the addictive, goal-oriented meta-game that involves collecting items (cargo). Cargo Commander is one of those games that is fun to pick up and play on those occasions you want to play something with simple mechanics and that doesn’t require too much attention.

Cargo Commander is considered by many to be a rouge-lite game because it has randomly-generated worlds and a (quasi)single-life mechanic. The randomly-generated worlds (sectors) are created uniquely based on the name given to them. You can type in any series of alphanumerical units to create a new sector. Once it is created, it remains the same forever. This includes for all other players. You also can visit old sectors which have already been created by other players. I thought this was a fun and interesting dynamic; but be aware that this functionality of the game only works in online mode (as well as leaderboards and achievements).

I think the way “death” is handled in the game is perfect. It is not the kind of game where one mistake and death means the past two hours of gameplay meant nothing. You still keep all the cargo you collected— and since the whole meta-game revolves around collecting cargo, that means that you get to keep your progress even after dying. That said, dying isn’t completely irrelevant or immaterial. In each randomly generated sector you must reach at least a certain point without dying so you can retrieve the “sector-pass,” and gain access to a new area. If you die, the sector restarts. It generally takes 5-10 minutes to reach the “sector-pass” in each.

The environments are bare and repetitive, so don’t expect to be awed by the graphics. But the soundtrack is rather catchy and fits the addictive nature of the game. The gameplay is also quite simple and unvaried; the first hour of gameplay will be basically the same as the tenth. But it is also this simplicity that makes the game enjoyable and addictive.

Put simply, Cargo Commander is styled to have simple mechanics and not require that much concentration, but with a long and “grindy” meta-game. That common underlying style is then refined into a 2D-platformer with rouge-lite elements. If that sounds like the kind of game you generally enjoy, then you will probably enjoy this thoroughly. For others who are on the fence regarding the genre, you will probably get a few hours of enjoyment from this, but may then get bored.

Follow my curation page to see more of my recommendations!
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