In a world torn by war, the aged gremlin archaeologist Mortimer MacGuffin harbors the dark secret of a powerful artifact.
User reviews: Very Positive (846 reviews)
Release Date: Jul 31, 2012

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Buy The Book of Unwritten Tales

Packages that include this game

Buy The Book of Unwritten Tales Digital Deluxe Edition

Includes 2 items: The Book of Unwritten Tales, The Book of Unwritten Tales Digital Extras

Buy The Book of Unwritten Tales Collection

Includes 6 items: The Book of Unwritten Tales, The Book of Unwritten Tales 2, The Book of Unwritten Tales 2 Almanac Edition Extras, The Book of Unwritten Tales Digital Extras, The Book of Unwritten Tales: Critter Chronicles Digital Extras, The Book of Unwritten Tales: The Critter Chronicles

Buy The Adventure Company Hits Collection

Includes 15 items: 15 Days, Aura: Fate of the Ages, Black Mirror, Black Mirror II, Black Mirror III, Dark Fall 2: Lights Out, Dark Fall: The Journal, Jack Keane 2 - The Fire Within, Overclocked: A History of Violence, Safecracker: The Ultimate Puzzle Adventure, The Book of Unwritten Tales, The Book of Unwritten Tales: The Critter Chronicles, The Moment of Silence, The Mystery of the Druids, The Raven - Legacy of a Master Thief

 

Recommended By Curators

"An actually funny and lovely point & click adventure game. Definitely among the best in recent years."

Recent updates View all (3)

February 19

The Book of Unwritten Tales 2 is now available!

Dear Adventure fans,

we are so glad to announce that The Book of Unwritten Tales 2 has left Early Access status and is now available.

http://store.steampowered.com/app/279940/

We have also added a new Collection as well as a special Almanac Edition (and an Upgrade Option for Standard Edition/Early Access buyers with the exact pricing difference between Standard and Almanac Edition - so no disadvantages involved)

http://store.steampowered.com/app/346230/

JOIN OUR ADVENTURE!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1TIa042jr_k

Your Nordic Games Team!

1 comments Read more

Reviews

“You'll have to go all the way back to 1993 until you can find a game that delivers this much fun. Telltale, this is how you should have done when you resurrected the adventure genre. Beware, you're not alone anymore…”
9/10 – Eurogamer Sweden

“The Book of Unwritten Tales is a top notch adventure game that any fan of the genre will appreciate.”
93/100 – Gamingillustrated

“Never in the past decade we've seen such a well-built comedy/ fantasy adventure game, filled to the brim with great narration, sense of purpose and feelings of joy and despair. An absolute must have for every "adventurer".”
9.5/10 – GameOver

The Book of Unwritten Tales 2

The Book of Unwritten Tales 2 is out now! http://store.steampowered.com/app/279940/

About This Game

In a world torn by war, the aged gremlin archaeologist Mortimer MacGuffin harbors the dark secret of a powerful artifact. Whoever calls this artifact his own, will determine the fate of the world.

While the Army of the Shadows sends out its best and most devious agents to discover the secret, the Alliance's four heroes find themselves involuntarily drawn into the crisis...

Key features:

  • Humorous Point & Click homage to the RPG and fantasy genre.
  • About 20 hours of gameplay in a massive game world with detailed graphics.
  • Multi-character gameplay: Play as Wilbur, Nate, Ivo, and the Critter - in turn or simultaneously - and use the skills of your heroes wisely.
  • Meet numerous crazy characters - from two-headed ogres and vegetarian dragons to good-natured zombies.
  • Solve over 150 mind-boggling puzzles and discover more than 300 items that can be used and combined.

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
    Minimum:
    • OS:Windows XP SP 3 (32bit) / Vista SP 2 / Windows 7 SP 1
    • Processor:Pentium IV 2 GHz / Athlon 2.4 GHz
    • Memory:2 GB RAM
    • Graphics:Direct-X 9c compliant video card with 128 MB RAM, PixelShader 2.0
    • DirectX®:9.0c
    • Hard Drive:6 GB HD space
    Recommended:
    • OS:Windows XP SP 3 (32bit) / Vista SP 2 / Windows 7 SP 1
    • Processor:3 GHz
    • Memory:4 GB RAM
    • Graphics:Direct-X 9c compliant video card with 256 MB RAM, PixelShader 2.0
    • DirectX®:9.0c
    • Hard Drive:6 GB HD space
    Minimum:
    • OS:Mac OS X 10.6/Mac OS X 10.7
    • Processor:1.4GHz Intel Mac Core Duo
    • Memory:1500 MB RAM
    • Graphics:Intel GMA-950-Grafikkarte with 64MB VRAM or better
    • Hard Drive:6 GB HD space
Helpful customer reviews
39 of 41 people (95%) found this review helpful
14.5 hrs on record
Posted: April 20
The Book of Unwritten Tales was the first game by the German development studio King Art to be released internationally, in 2012. It put this adventure games-developer firmly on the map, and has been praised for adding a unique feel to the classic point-and-click adventure genre.

For me it has been a long time since I last played a game like this. Actually, it was only since the adveture games by Telltale Games that I was redrawn into the genre, having played several of the classics many, many years ago (think 90's). While the Telltale concept of adventure games focuses on storytelling in combination with some action scenes, King Art completely stays within the boundaries of the classic adventure genre. Literally the only thing that needs to be done to complete this game, is pointing and clicking - the keyboard nor any other action is necessary, apart from pressing "spacebar" in order to see which objects are interactable with. While this may feel like a somewhat all too classic an approach for a game in the 2010's, it actually still works pretty well. Of course, just like any moint and click adventure game, The Book of Unwriten Tales has a lot of puzzles, but these don't feel like being tucked onto the game in order to provide a challenge or prolong playtime. The puzzles in this game form an organical part of it: they arise out of the situation, and most (if not all) of them can be solved by just thinking, not by gratuitously pointing and clicking all over the place (so it could as well be called a point and think game).

That a classic adventure game like this still works nowadays, is mainly due to the interesting storyline, which drew me into the game pretty quickly, helped by the amazingly original and beautiful artwork. The soundtrack too is top-notch and strikes the perfect balance between providing some background music and yet helps in painting each scene. Playing for a large part as the young gnome Wilbur Weathervane made me identify with this smart an witty character very soon, even more so since young Wilbur looks at life in a refreshing, sometimes naive way. Later in the game other characters come into play as well, providing some welcome contrasts, but it always felt like coming home whenever Wilbur was the one I was in charge of.

While all these qualities help to make a game of good to very good quality, the one element that differentiates The Book of Unwritten Tales from lots of other games, is the humour and even the irony with which the game looks at itself and at the entire world of games. Describing individual scenes from this game is difficult without resorting to spoilers, but when at a point quite early in the game I had to shut down a "server" for a "rpg machine" in order to rid two side-characters from their "game-addiction", I laughed out loud. The entire game is full of these sidekicks at the gaming industry, complete with wondrous quotes and one-liners. When a very depressed Death himself at a certain points says "This is an adventure game, nobody is supposed to actually die here", you know you're in for a treat.

Besides the poking at different games and genres, The Book of Unwritten Tales also makes fun or rather poses some questions about the entire fantasy-concept. It does so by obvious references to The Lord of the Rings, but also by turning some conventions from the fantasy-genre upside down or inside-out. All in all, this is a game into a lot of thinking has been put, without interfering with the actual fun of playing it. I can only recommend it wholeheartedly to anyone even remotedly interested in adventure games. And for all of you who have forgotten how a classic point-and-click game should look and play like, don't look any further. They don't come any better than this one for the time being.

Overall score: 8,5/10.
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14 of 15 people (93%) found this review helpful
21.5 hrs on record
Posted: January 7
I really enjoyed playing the game. It has clever story and dialogues. I laughed a lot.
The four protagonists are adorerable. But not only them. I thrilled with the idea of inverse worlds(you are in a world where you can meet gnomes, dwarves, dragons etc and humans play a game which takes place in real world ).
The riddles were not so difficult. The answers are mostly obvious (you do not have to guess what the creator want me to do). If you have what you need in your inventory then the answer is clear.
I strongly recommend it.
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5 of 6 people (83%) found this review helpful
20.6 hrs on record
Posted: March 9
One of the best pont-&-click adventure's in my gaming history.
What's make this game of one best's - is that it's mirror most fantasy universe's (Lord Of The Rings, Avantasia, Warcraft and e.t.c.) and even Real Life in so sarcastic manner, so you can't just ignore it.

Puzzles and quest's grow in difficulty with every new chapter (but most's of them are not so difficult; I don't use "SPACE" to highlight all active object's untill chapter 4).

"Sam & Max" now have a really serious competitor ina face of thoose fellas.

Highly recommended for all who familiar with fantasy worlds (even a little) and have a deep lust of good laughing infront of monitor.
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3 of 3 people (100%) found this review helpful
19.3 hrs on record
Posted: June 10
One of the most important things about making jokes is timing, in particular when it comes to breaking the fourth wall. Break it too often, the wall will eventually crumble, and the mechanic stops being funny.

Unfortunately BOUT suffer from this problem. The forth wall is a particular important wall when it comes to maintaining the game's universe as a credible world different from the world of the player. Because the fourth wall is so utterly destroyed by the game itself, immersion into the game universe becomes impossible. This leads to a reduction in the experience, so the game becomes what a classic P&C game is at the mechanical core. A string of puzzles where certain objects must be combined in the right order to progress the story.

In good P&C games, the attention of the player is directed away from the core puzzle mechanic by an engaging story, and immersive environment.

Immersion is very often what makes the story believable and engaging, and because immersion is destroyed in BOUT, the story seems generally weak, and the mechanics of the strung together puzzles comes to the forefront. That it is just a puzzle game is not hidden behind the immersive story.

One of the most important things about a P&C is that you can trust the characters ad the game when it comes to the hints and help it offers when trying to solve a particular puzzle. The game should never give you information that is misleading. It can keep information from you, but shouldn't make the player feel cheated or lied to. BOUT has a couple of these instances, but generally the puzzles are logical and reasonable.

It has been claimed that the female elf is needlessly sexualized in BOUT. To that I have to ask: have you seen her move? Just because she wears very little clothing, doesn't mean that she is sexualized, or presented as a mere sexual being, with no other purpose than being visual stimulation for the male gaze. To this male gazer, there is very little sexual about her.

It has a few graphical glitches, but nothing game breaking in my playthrough.

As long as you treat BOUT as primarily a puzzler, and less a P&C with a story, you'll have a few good hours of entertainment. As a P&C adventure, I can't recommend the game. As a puzzler with commentary, it's quite good. Not a difficult puzzler, but good for relaxed playing with a smile or laugh here and there.
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2 of 2 people (100%) found this review helpful
26.3 hrs on record
Posted: May 21
A very charming game. The difficulty is nothing to brag about but it more than makes up for it by its great storyline and the fantastic characters, especially the lovable gnome Vilbur. The game doesn't take itself too seriously which fits the entire game really well. It's a great game to relax to with a good sense of humor.

The puzzles are overall easy to figure out and most of the time it's not the lust for solving puzzles that keeps you going, but the urge to see and hear how the character react when they interact with objects and other characters and also to see where the crazy story takes you next.

I highly recommend this game. I'm currently replaying it after a few years and it still delivers!
Well worth the money.
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