Immerse yourself in massive fleet battles where your dog-fighting skills will directly affect the fate of the cosmos.
User reviews: Very Positive (1,193 reviews)
Release Date: Jan 23, 2013

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Packages that include this game

Buy Strike Suit Zero Mega Bundle

Includes 6 items: Strike Suit Infinity, Strike Suit Zero, Strike Suit Zero - Raptor DLC, Strike Suit Zero Artbook, Strike Suit Zero Heroes of the Fleet DLC, Strike Suit Zero Soundtrack

Buy Strike Suit Infinity

Strike Suit Infinity is Zero's evil twin: a lean, mean arcade experience that cranks it up to eleven for the ultimate adrenaline rush.

 

Recommended By Curators

"Compatible with DK1. No known plans for DK2."

Reviews

"Strike Suit Zero is proof that there’s life in the space combat genre yet."
8/10 – NowGamer

“Strike Suit Zero nails the balance between simulation and arcade shooter, creating an excellent combat experience”
IGN

"Just about everything you want in a space combat game."
Penny Arcade

Steam Workshop



Adventurous Mod-Makers can now take XedMod, the Strike Suit Toolset, for a spin...
Use XedMod to create your own ships, weapons and missions for Strike Suit or break away entirely and make brand new games.

About This Game

In the year 2299, an interstellar war rages on. In a bid to save Earth from destruction, you must take control of the Strike Suit – a revolutionary fighter craft with the ability to transform into a lethal suit of space armor. Immerse yourself in massive fleet battles where your dog-fighting skills will directly affect the fate of the cosmos.


Discover a colorful and vibrant universe, with an epic story where the fate of Earth hangs in the balance and your actions will determine the outcome: preventing Earth’s destruction is your immediate concern but preserving its future is your ultimate goal.


Engage intelligent enemy fighters and take on colossal capital ships, exploiting weak points in their super-structure to blow them apart. Upgrade your ships and customize your weapon load-outs to tailor combat to your tastes. Take advantage of four unique craft, including the Strike Suit, to experience dogfighting action as you’ve never seen it before.


This Is Space Combat Reborn.

Key Features


  • Fast, frantic space combat: freely engage multiple enemies, dogfight other pilots, fight massive fleet battles and defend vast structures.
  • The Strike Suit: strategically switch from Pursuit Mode (speed and power) to Strike Mode (a powerful, highly maneuverable combat mode)
  • Capital Ship Destruction: take capital ships apart piece by piece – take out their turrets or target weak-points to blow out entire sections of their superstructure.
  • Multiple endings: your choices in game directly affect the state of Earth at the end of the game.
  • Vibrant and vivid universe: space is far from the dark, featureless void it’s supposed to be. Discover the color and vibrancy of the Strike Suit universe across 13 unique locations.
  • Ship Designs from renowned Mechanical Design engineer Junji Okubo (Appleseed: Ex Machina, Steel Battalion.)
  • Music from award-winning composer Paul Ruskay (Homeworld) including a collaboration with Japanese singer/songwriter Kokia (Tales of Innocence, Gunslinger Girl: II Teatrino)
  • Joystick compatible: as well as being fully optimized for mouse and keyboard, and gamepads, Strike Suit Zero is compatible with a range of joysticks for full immersion.
  • Multi-screen support: play the game across three monitors, and discover the Strike Suit universe in all its widescreen glory.

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
SteamOS + Linux
    Minimum:
    • OS:Windows Vista
    • Processor:Dual core 2.4Ghz
    • Memory:4 GB RAM
    • Graphics:NVIDIA 250 GTS / ATI Radeon 4800 series
    • DirectX®:11
    • Hard Drive:3 GB HD space
    • Sound:Any stereo sound card
    Recommended:
    • OS:Windows 7
    • Processor:Quad Core
    • Memory:8 GB RAM
    • Graphics:NVIDIA GTX 560 / ATI Radeon HD5850
    • DirectX®:11
    • Hard Drive:3 GB HD space
    • Sound:Any 5.1 sound card
    Minimum:
    • OS:MacOS X 10.8.3 or higher
    • Processor:Intel 2GHz Dual Core or better
    • Memory:4 GB RAM
    • Graphics:NVIDIA 250 GTS, ATI Radeon 4800 series, Intel HD3000. Older cards known to work, but not officially supported.
    • Hard Drive:3 GB HD space
    • Sound:Any stereo sound card
    Minimum:
    • OS:Ubuntu 12.04 LTS - Known to work on many others.
    • Processor:Intel 2GHz Dual Core or better
    • Memory:4 GB RAM
    • Graphics:NVIDIA 250 GTS, ATI Radeon 4800 series, Intel HD3000. OpenGL 3.0. Older cards known to work, but not officially supported.
    • Hard Drive:3 GB HD space
    • Sound:Any stereo sound card
Helpful customer reviews
16 of 18 people (89%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
12.6 hrs on record
Posted: January 17
It's always been a little odd to me that an idea as freaking cool as mecha has be so minimally explored in games.

I guess the easy answer for that would be because making a quality mecha game is a lot harder than it sounds, which Strike Suit Zero exemplifies even as it comes possibly closer than anyone to pulling it off. In the same breath it also attempts to revitalize space combat shooters, again succeeding to a commendable degree yet still failing to shake the nagging issues that quickly present themselves. Strike Suit Zero's potential and ambition never wanes, but that doesn't stop its aspirations to come crashing down when they collide with reality.

Strike Suit Zero as stated before, is a merging of large scale space fighter-pilot combat and screen filling mecha insanity, by way of the titular Strike Suit which can transform between a fast, maneuverable ship and the extremely power mecha form. The dynamic of swooping around picking off stray fighters and then switching forms to annihilate larger enemies is strategic but also just super cool, making you feel like the all-powerful terror your enemies supposedly see you as and gives developer Born Ready Games an excuse to blow the particle effects out during massive space battles that if nothing else are incredible to look at.

There's a weight to your ship that feels powerful, but without the limited mobility that often comes with higher firepower. It's balanced by requiring you to charge up your ship by killing enemies before you can transformed, and this limited fuel makes combat fast and frantic, as you chain together attacks to keep your meter full while trying to keep track of the situation. Strike Suit Zero excels at making you feel like just one small part of the giant battles going on around you, but still one capable of destroying giant cruisers and chasing down fighters.

Unfortunately Born Ready Games has flown a little too close to the sun as the scale of the game quickly seems to get away from them, and the experience as a whole suffers quite a bit for it. Pacing is on of Strike Suit Zero's biggest opponents, and a concept it's fairly unconcerned with. Early missions are plodding, slow excursions as stiff bombing ships before you're given the Strike Suit, but even after missions have a tendency to stretch on and on as they continue to pile on new objectives which look very much like the last. Mission variety is virtually nonexistent, giving you largely the exact same scenarios each mission but ratcheting up the difficulty to uncomfortable levels.

These difficulty spikes and the unequaled number of checkpoints intensifies the lack of mission variation, which may have gone unnoticed for awhile but becomes hard to ignore when you already had to complete said objective dozens of times do to some untimely deaths. The vagueness with which objectives are explains only makes things worse, often overwhelming me with different tasks to where I didn't even know how to start or simply saying one thing while expecting me to infer the actual objective myself, usually by watching my ship explode and then reloading to hopefully get it the second time. Or the third. Or the forth. That's if I'm lucky.

Much of this difficulty could likely be the result of having missed upgrades the game expected me to have, as each is tied to a specific optional mission objective which are typically much harder to achieve than the original scenario. You can likely see the problem with a system like this, as it rewards skilled play but leaves everyone else in a state of incapable inferiority. The only option then is to replay old missions attempting to unlock the necessary upgrade or pray you can somehow scrape through anyway, which in my case usually involved copious amounts of perseverance and luck.

If not for the constant interruption of a cutscene I'd have likely forgotten there was a narrative here at all, one note and vague on details, delivered with monotone voiceovers telling of events you don't care about and characters you can't remember. There's the basis of something really interesting here, but it waits until the last moment to tell you any of it and by then it's too late to salvage much of anything from a story which for all intents and purposes is just you blowing up countless enemies that for some reason hate your guts.

The moments when Strike Suit Zero opens up, when the pieces click into place and its firing on all cylinders, are amazing and what kept me playing despite them being perpetuated with frustration and monotony. Born Ready Games has so entirely nailed the feel of the game they wanted to create, if only the scenarios you were placed in could keep up or give you any reason to want to continue on with them.
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6 of 9 people (67%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
2.1 hrs on record
Posted: March 7
My advice? Stick around until around mission 4 or 5.

Mish 1: "Wow this looks like crap compared to the screenshots i've seen. Combat is a little dry is there anything else to this game? No? Just combat? oh...

Mish 2: "Nhnn why'd I even buy this space/plane games arn't really my thing and the story to this is pretty ♥♥♥♥♥ I mean who the hell is this guy supposed to be? WHO ARE YOU SHOULD I EVEN CARE??"

Mish 3: "Yeah gettin bored of th- oh a mech suit cool. Pretty awkward to control though.."

Mish 4: "These space fights are looking pretty cool now...missles n' ships n' particle effects all up in my face...Think i'm getting used to controling this thing now to..."

Mish 5: "I am Hamster Jelly. Hero of space"
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2 of 2 people (100%) found this review helpful
18.1 hrs on record
Posted: March 6
The funnest flight/space sim I've played since Rogue Squadron on the N64—similar structure too.

You'll get the basic patrol mission stuff to start, then you're slowly introduced to combat. The missions are relatively straightforward to begin with. Like Rogue Squadron, eventually the missions start evolving halfway through—simple missions become heated dog fights as enemy reinforcements arrive.

The learning curve is a bit steeper than something like Rogue Squadron though; there are a lot of dynamics involved that the game trains you in at a good pace. This is how it's supposed to work.

I definitely recommend a gamepad. I'm a keyboard user, but this is the sort of thing gamepads are built for. By the last missions, you'll be twitching and flicking buttons without hesitation or thought.

One more thing that makes this fantastic: the soundtrack. The blend of synthetica, ambients and old school woodwinds gives you something along the lines of space-age maritime music. I can't quite nail it down, but they definitely nailed the mood. Cruising towards the black fleet to the harrowing tune of a clarinet (oboe?) doesn't seem awesome on paper, but it is.
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1 of 1 people (100%) found this review helpful
61.6 hrs on record
Posted: May 21
This game is quite fun and a good challenge. Best played with HOTAS joysticks, but supports keyboard+mouse and game controllers, as well, for those without a good joystick available. However, the lack of any sort of multiplayer detracts from the experience, but not too terribly. I also found everything well-made graphically and often rather pleasing to the eye. In terms of gameplay, the titular machine really feels like a force to be reckoned with; however, while all the vehicles feel different from the others, the Strike Suit is the one that really stood out for me, as it most likely has and probably will for others who have piloted or will pilot it.

Overall, I give this game an 8.5/10
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2 of 3 people (67%) found this review helpful
3.8 hrs on record
Posted: December 7, 2014
Strike Suit Zero is a well-paced mission-based arcade style space odyssey set in the distant future when humans have colonized the galaxy, and a civil war has broken out among mankind. The player plays as a reformed fighter pilot who is re-commissioned to the front lines in a desperate suicidal struggle to stop the rebel onslaught against Earth, along with their new and mysterious weapon that is literally ripping holes through entire fleets and worlds.

While you have very little interaction with the enemy faction, what are incredible are the believable archetypes of the allies and friends you make along the way. You will care very much about the allies you rescue and that rescue you from the perils of interstellar warfare. With themes from several science fiction settings and ominous overtones about the rise and fall of mankind, there is plenty of depth to be excited about as you meet new characters and face new challenges.

The gameplay is magnificent and convincing; once you get ahold of the strike suit, you go from being a regular pilot hanging on to life with sheer grit to a space hero like unto those in anime of this genre, hell-bent on keeping your friends and comrades alive through each and every encounter. You will hang turns, glide around gigantic ships and launch attacks so devastating that afterwards you can't help but jump up and roar with righteous vindication. To that end, the protagonist and the enemies are so quiet that you are left space to imagine you are any kind of hero or anti-hero you like, the plot ambiguous enough to let you have your own adventure while still shaping the events and circumstances you fight your way through. Are you a grizzled space cowboy back for one last ride? Or are you a bloodthirsty convict, with nothing left but a war to fight? It's up to you to impose your personal motivations on the main character. In spite of or perhaps due to these intentional gaps in information, the story telling, the sound, the visuals and the music are all clearly a labor of love and do exactly what they're intended to do: Let you have your own robot space fighter fantasy.

Are there negatives? Yes, a few. The game is too short. The director's cut is oddly paced and undercuts the original vision of the game. The combat is samey and the upgrades are extremely difficult, impossible in some cases, to obtain without replaying missions later on, which greatly pads out the playtime with replay. However, as an Indi title and one of the best games so far this millennium, all of these negatives can be completely overlooked. There are plenty of modes and versions for you to satisfy your desire to dogfight and ace your way to victory, and ultimately all add up to satisfying content. Never mind how amazing some of the mods are for this game.

11/10. If you like arcade shooters, sci-fi, anime, space odyssey, warfare, dogfighting, or just stupidly impressive visuals, play this game. Strike Suit Zero is a fantastic time.
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2 of 3 people (67%) found this review helpful
5.8 hrs on record
Posted: December 20, 2014
Buying this game was somewhat of a gamble to me.
At first I only wanted to play some space sim because I missed Freelancer, and I got disappointed quickly because apparently SSZ is not an open world game. It's more of an arcade/action game, with level-based progression. However, just because it's not open world doesn't mean it's a bad game. In fact, it's really cool!

Gameplay is fast, control is so smooth and works well both with mouse-keyboard or gamepad (I prefer gamepad though). Cockpit view is nice, and the graphics are good enough albeit nothing special. The difficulty is a bit high at times, especially if you want to get the Optional Objectives. Once you've unlocked the Strike Suit, the gameplay changes DRAMMATICALLY. It feels so empowering, so great to be liberated from the normal movement of a spaceship.

The soundtrack is also pretty good, especially when it includes vocal track by KOKIA (one of my most favorite Japanese singers). You can get the Strike Suit Zero Mega Bundle cheap these days, so I recommend you buy the bundle altogether. It's a fun game!
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3 of 5 people (60%) found this review helpful
1.5 hrs on record
Posted: March 5
first mission meh rest just ♥♥♥♥in epic !
also + for another mecha game!
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5 of 9 people (56%) found this review helpful
3 people found this review funny
5.0 hrs on record
Posted: December 5, 2014
Love It!
All I every wanted in a mech game!
Guns!
Plasma Guns!
Rockets!
Mechs!
#Missle Galore!
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1 of 2 people (50%) found this review helpful
5.6 hrs on record
Posted: December 22, 2014
If you have hard time controlling the ship, try swap roll-yaw axis.

Good aircraft dogfight game, btw.
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1 of 2 people (50%) found this review helpful
0.3 hrs on record
Posted: March 21
Epic Space simulator, with an astonishing soundtrack i recommended this game for you who love the space and robot
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248 of 294 people (84%) found this review helpful
8.8 hrs on record
Posted: November 25, 2013
A colorful space shooter hampered by mediocre controls, it's a step above its arcade cousin by having a storyline and a more gradual difficulty curve. It proved impossible to play with mouse, keyboard or even joystick, requiring me to plug in a gamepad, much to my disgust. Its flashy graphics are often overwhelming, to the point I more than once had difficulty actually seeing the enemies past all the explosions. A lack of variety in enemy ships and tactics and too much reliance on timed missions (especially the absolutely terrible final mission) hampered my involvement with the title. Still, it frenetic combat had its moments and - especially given the desert of space-sims these days - I could hardly turn my nose up at any offering. Flawed it may have been, but still fun.
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138 of 155 people (89%) found this review helpful
10.5 hrs on record
Posted: November 25, 2013
If you like taking part in large space battles as a one man fighter (or bomber or 'strike suit') this game is competent at delivering that experience. You get to do strafing runs on Cruisers or Frigates, and taking out their turrets or weak points is very satisfying. Using the strike suit is a blast once you get the hang of it. At rapid pace you can lock and then launch about 40 missiles at varying targets, either severely crippling a smaller capital ship or thinning out a fighter formation.

The story is somewhat interesting, but mostly only serves to tie together the levels. Checkpoints are plentiful towards the beginning of the game but become non-existant at the end of the game when you need them most to save yourself from having to redo sections that are cakewalks leading up to some very challenging sections.

Unfortunately for me personally the frustrating checkpoint system really hampered my enjoyment during key moments of the game. For instance in mission 13 of the standard campaign a character essentially just monologues a bunch of story explanation at you while you navigate some incredibly tight tunnels for about 7 minutes before reaching your destination. There are two major problems with this. First of all the game up until this point does not in any way prepare you for precision flying, with every other level taking place in a wide open space battle. Secondly there are absolutely no checkpoints on this mission and this means when you inevitably die on this level, you must hear the explanation monlogue again... and again... and keep redoing the same simple manuevers.

At it's best the game is a well put together space combat game. At it's worst it is an exercise in frustration. Overall I would say that it is slightly above average, and recommend it only to fans of the genre.
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317 of 423 people (75%) found this review helpful
2 people found this review funny
4.2 hrs on record
Posted: September 2, 2013
I was really having a great time at first, and it felt like X-Wing or Wing Commander had jumped forward in time a couple decades. Then I got the Strike Suit, and the game started to feel like it had a weird split personality, and half the time I was playing one of those games, and the other half I transformed into a giant robot in space and played Zone of the Enders instead. It did not seem like they fit together at first, but after playing a little more, things started to work out. However, with the ability to only save between missions and the very, very sparse checkpoints, I rapidly got very tired of having to repeat the long, easy parts of levels just to get another chance at the hard bit at the end. It got frustrating enough that I wished I had a physical copy of it so I could throw it at something. Then I uninstalled the game, even though it's otherwise fun, because I have better things to do with my time than play the boring parts of a game over and over again.

Edit: Just for the record, Strike Suit Infinity addressed my main complaint with this game, and I found myself enjoying that a lot more because of the faster pace and ability to jump right into the heavier action. Ironically, I probably wouldn't've been able to get into that as easily and have as much fun with it if I hadn't spent some time playing this one first.
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78 of 97 people (80%) found this review helpful
13.4 hrs on record
Posted: December 1, 2013
Strike Suit Zero is a space flight combat game and takes its inspiration from numerous different franchises, most notably Homeworld, Freelancer, Colony Wars, Star Wars, Gundam, Macross and Freespace. As a huge fan of Mecha animes and space combat in general i just have to love this game.
Just finished it and sadly its not that long, but maybe there will be some cool dlcs. Pick it up if it goes on sale, right now its not worth its full money, sadly.
Its a good game, but they could have done better, for example entering huge ships and destroy them from the inside would have been awesome.
Lets hope for good DLCs or other devs that grab that idea.
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69 of 88 people (78%) found this review helpful
27.1 hrs on record
Posted: November 8, 2013
This game is a fantastic shooter/sim. It doesn't have all the controls of a proper sim, but the handling and vastness make if feel more than just a shooter. The best I can compare this game to is a PS1 series called Colony Wars, which I felt was also a really good game. The controls are very easy to learn, and quite solid and responsive. Your HUD is simple and tells you everything you need to know. Definately recommend playing with keyboard and mouse if you're not using a flight stick, controller seems a little lacking when trying to execute tight maneuvers.
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84 of 112 people (75%) found this review helpful
7.3 hrs on record
Posted: January 5, 2014
This is the sort of game you -want- to like: an indie Kickstarter darling that wants to bring back the space-shooter with style. Unfortunately, it's just not very good, in many different ways.

A quick overview of SSZ: obviously it's a space-"sim", or what I call a space-shooter. It is not, as you might expect, a game based on the old X-Wing/Wing Commander/Freespace style of games, but rather a 50/50 blend of Japanese space shooters and Freespace. Your aiming reticule is not fixed in the middle of the screen, but floating around, and some missile weapons allow you to 'multi-lock' by sweeping over multiple targets while holding down the missile button. Aesthetically, the anime influences the music (think Ghost in the Shell, not anime schoolgirls). and your transforming ship/suit . Wing Commander/Freespace influences everything else, with capital ships that use both torpedoes from Wing Commander and Beam Weapons from Freespace.

To begin with, even starting the game leaves a bad impression. The game's menus are very poorly optimized for mouse control, and its design suggests the devs at some point were trying very hard to prepare to the game for a console release that never happened. In addition, the game defaults to 720P, and inexplicably will change to 720P if you alt-tab to a different window, regardless of what setting you had it on before. The control rebinding is also very clunky, needlessly splitting up the keys into multiple categories based on the state your ship is in. It allows you to have the same key bound to multiple actions without warning you, and this is exacerbated by that fact that some actions will not conflict with each other (e.g. movement keys in the different ship modes) but others will. Which is which is up to you to experience and be frustrated by.

Second, the writing is a complete throwaway. The space-dogfighting genre for whatever reason, has a history of having good writing, or at least interesting plots. From Wing Commander to Tie Fighter to the eternally classic Freespace, they all had writing to keep you interested. Not so here. The devs had exactly two ideas: to create a space shooter, and that it should involve a Macross-style transforming space-jet-fighter. There is no interesting dialogue; only one of the characters are even given the barest of characterizations (and he disappears after three missions). Even the backstory to the war in the game is vague and illogical, and contradicts itself in some of the loading screen expository background information texts.

Third you get to problems with the gameplay- to put it succinctly, it's simply not fun. The game bounces between far too easy dogfight sections and extremely tedious destroy-the-torpedoes capital ship protection sections. The console heritage is noticeable here, with none of the weapons/shield energy systems management from classic space shooters. There's even a lack of targetting buttons to cycle through targetting enemy ship subsystems. It's all much simpler than fully Western-influence space shooters. Unfortunately, the Japanese influence on the game doesn't add much either. The transforming jet that is so poorly justified in the writing is also poorly justified in the gameplay. You need build up 'flux energy' to even be able to transform into 'mech mode', but the power of it isn't even so impressive. Essentially you use it to be able to spam infinite missiles at Capital Ship hardpoints while you have the transform meter, and to allow yourself the ability to turn much faster than in jet mode. It's not at all exhilarating, which is pretty damn disappointing for a game's central gimmick.

A note on the game's Freespace 2 inspirations: when Freespace 2 was released, it was highly praised for how exciting the capital ships made combat, with flak shells exploding around you and massively powerful beam cannons being traded between capital ships. SSZ superficially copies all of this, but completely fails to capture any of the emotion. The sound design is completely lacking, so you barely notice any of the capital chips around. Flak Shells make feeble buzzing on your shield. Completely missing is any of massive weapons rocking your small fighter around in the battlefield. Capital Ship Beam Weapons also lack both a sound effect punch and the actually gameplay punch. They may light up between capital ships, but the damage is actually still done with lots and lots of torpedoes. In essence, all of the aesthetic are 'cargo-cult' ish: capturing the appearance but none of the essence.

Lastly, something so terrible it deserves a section it's own, the game's final mission. The developers responsible for creating the final mission should never be allow to design anything again. They should not even be able to voice opinions about other games. The very existing of this game's final mission is a crime against gaming itself. The final mission unfolds as follows: instead of the gameplay from the previous 95% of the game, you find yourself suddenly just flying in a narrow tunnel. Your only objective is to avoid hitting the walls, which will drain your shields and armor, eventually killing you if you scrape the walls too often. The tunnel makes frequent 90 degree turns just so it's not too easy. In addition, all the tunnels look alike, and it is very easy to bounce off a wall, and get turned around without realizing it. This goes on for a minumum of 6 minutes, even if you're holding the thrust button down the whole time, and this is =all without checkpoints=. At the end, you get to make a choice about whether to destroy something for 1 briefly narrated ending, or to flying through more tunnels (timed!) to destroy something else for a different briefly narrated ending that isn't any better.

If you are a decent human being, the last mission of the game alone should be reason enough not to pay even one cent for this game. Seriously. Go play something else.
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46 of 54 people (85%) found this review helpful
60.5 hrs on record
Posted: April 10, 2014
9/10 Game Play -
I like transform-fighting machine such as VF series in Macross. This game have mostly suited me, the process of fierce battle is extremely fun. But the game could be better.

7/10 Graphics -
The backgrounds universe is beautiful, but the screen is still somewhat simple and crude.

9/10 Sound -
The game has its distinctive music, I enjoy myself when flying and fighting. People who have bought the mega bundle can download them.

6/10 Difficulty -
People may find it hard to control the plane well, omni-directional flight can also make someone dizzy.

7/10 Lasting Appeal -
Just singleplayer mod with 3 level of difficulty, you can play over and over again to reach a high score, but times you must find it boring.

Total Score - 38/50 Sehr Gut
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32 of 35 people (91%) found this review helpful
1 person found this review funny
9.7 hrs on record
Posted: October 15, 2014
I have been wanting a fun space shooter for a while. My friends and I used to wear out Freelancer, Starlancer and Tie Fighter (the all-time king of space sims IMO). Strike Suit Zero was a fun diversion, had some cool moments, but towards the end had a very rinse-and-repeat feel to it that took a bit of the wind out of my sails. Target capital ship - lock on with unlimited missiles - fire missiles to destroy subsystems - fly to other side - target and lock on - fire unlimited missiles - and done.
It is a fun game, and thats what matters, though, once I got the strike suit and learned to use it effectively, the game got too easy. I got all Platinums and all upgrades and after that there wasn't much point. Its also a tad short I think.

Fun ride while it lasts. Its cheap and enjoyable, but not a ton of content really. Mission objectives are pretty much always, go here and kill this before X dies. I enjoyed it but I wont be coming back to it much.

6.5/10
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43 of 62 people (69%) found this review helpful
2.3 hrs on record
Posted: December 12, 2013
I tried to like this game. As a huge fan of Wing Commander, X-Wing, and Colony Wars I was so ready to love a new space combat sim, even if it leaned toward the arcade side of things.

Ugh. Boring missions, terrible voice acting, and lousy checkpointing really strained by patience. The story is kind of fun, but the characters are all broadly-drawn stereotypes that completely undermine anything really interesting about it. The space combat is solid, but when you're grinding through another "destroy 20 enemy fighters" objective for the fourth time in the same mission, it gets a little old.

Worst of all, the strike suit itself actually sucks. It has a few powers that are essential to your mission objectives, but using it in regular dogfighting makes you far, far less effective. The controls change, so you're disoriented, and by design not as mobile. So you take a ton of damage as you spin around, trying to lock on to as many things as you can with your multi-missiles. Sometimes it works out, sometimes it doesn't, but it always felt like a bad idea.

It's a really, really pretty game though, and the music's amazing. Just, not much else about it is.
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11 of 13 people (85%) found this review helpful
9.0 hrs on record
Posted: December 2, 2013
When I was a kid, I played a lot of spaceship dogfighting games, especially Star Wars ones like X-Wing vs Tie Fighter and Rogue Squadron. It's a genre that's curiously disappeared from gaming despite the same appeal -- fast-paced action, reflex & skill gameplay, gorgeous sci-fi settings -- still being alive and well.

Out of the blue for me came Strike Suit Zero, an underdog sci-fi dogfighting adventure about gunning down ships, bombarding frigates, and launching 50 missiles at the same time while barely jetting out of crossfire with no shields and sliver of plating between you and space-explosion, all to a pulsing, adrenaline-pumping soundtrack. And let me tell you, it feels awesome.

While Strike Suit Zero is not as meaty in content as some classics I mentioned, it is a tremendous feat by an indie studio rivaling the look & feel of many an Ubisoft or EA game, and for the most part focuses on what lean dogfighting action it must.

So despite its occasional loose threads (the last story mission is a failure, unfortunately), Strike Suit Zero is a finely-crafted action experience that I'm glad to have discovered, and remain extremely excited about whatever the team pulls off next. Let it be said: I'd pre-order a sequel in a heartbeat.
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