Snapshot is the tale of a lone robot lost in an abandoned world. Armed with only his trusty camera, Pic sets forth on his great adventure. A camera might not seem like enough for a puzzle platforming adventure, but this camera is different from most: It has the ability to capture and remove from the world the very objects that it...
User reviews: Mostly Positive (188 reviews) - 77% of the 188 user reviews for this game are positive.
Release Date: Aug 30, 2012

Sign in to add this item to your wishlist, follow it, or mark it as not interested

Buy Snapshot

Buy Snapshot: Soundtrack Edition

Includes the full game and Soundtrack

Downloadable Content For This Game

 

About This Game

Snapshot is the tale of a lone robot lost in an abandoned world. Armed with only his trusty camera, Pic sets forth on his great adventure. A camera might not seem like enough for a puzzle platforming adventure, but this camera is different from most: It has the ability to capture and remove from the world the very objects that it photographs. Not only that, but it can also use its powers to paste the photos it took back into the environment! Everything that the camera captures is perfectly preserved, and when the photos are restored the objects are restored with it. On top of all of that, this amazing camera can also rotate the photos before they're pasted. Take a picture of an incoming fireball, rotate it and paste it to send it flying into a wall of heavy boxes to knock it out of the way. See what kind of crazy things can happen to Pic with his awesome (and probably magical) camera during the adventure of his life!

Key Features:

  • A unique photography mechanic
  • Over 100 different levels of platforming and puzzling.
  • 4 distinct environments to explore.
  • Secrets and time trial challenges for every level.
  • Hand crafted high resolution graphics.

System Requirements

Windows
Mac OS X
    Minimum:
    • OS:Windows XP
    • Processor:Intel Core 2 Duo
    • Memory:2 GB RAM
    • Graphics:nVidia 8800 GTS or Equivalent
    • DirectX®:9.0c
    • Hard Drive:500 MB HD space
    • Sound:On Board Soundcard
    Recommended:
    • OS:Windows 7
    • Processor:Intel Core 2 Duo
    • Memory:4 GB RAM
    • Graphics:nVidia 8800 GTS or Better
    • DirectX®:9.0c
    • Hard Drive:1 GB HD space
    • Sound:On Board Soundcard
    Minimum:
    • OS: OS X version Leopard 10.5.8, Snow Leopard 10.6.3, or later.
    • Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo
    • Memory: 2 GB RAM
    • Hard Disk Space: 500MB space
    • Video Card: GT 120 or better
    • Sound: On Board Soundcard
    Recommended:
    • OS: OS X version Leopard 10.5.8, Snow Leopard 10.6.3, or later.
    • Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo
    • Memory: 4 GB RAM
    • Hard Disk Space: 500MB space
    • Video Card: nVidia 8800 GTS or better
    • Sound: On Board Soundcard
Helpful customer reviews
2 of 2 people (100%) found this review helpful
23.8 hrs on record
Posted: February 1
In this puzzle platformer your a robot that has to get to the level exit by taking and placing objects. You take objects by taking their picture and replace them by untaking their picture. You can collect stars along the way, take pictures of special objects and try to beat the fastest times.

There are 100+ levels and they are divided into groups of 3. Each group introduces and highlights a new object. Most of the objects only make appearances in their group of 3. The first level of each group are the shortest with the second and third being progressively longer. Collecting the stars and special objects also adds quite a bit of length to a level. There are no checkpoints, So most failures require you to redo the whole level.

Which objects to place where is the meat of the game, But that is pretty obvious most of the time. The puzzle aspect comes into play most when figuring out how to get things into or out of no picture taking zones. Again not that difficult. The hardest part of the game is when you have to perform some mid-air photography acrobatics. Which can get quite annoying as you'll have to play the entire level over again just give it another try if you fail. It presents itself as being a casual game, and for the most part it is, But it has these areas that require patience and persistence.

It's an OK game, best played in short sessions. I went for the extra stuff and got them all up until the last 5 or 6 levels. At that point a failed jump was crashing the game making it very hard to figure out what to do next. So I skipped the rest and just finished out the game at 81% complete.

Marginal thumbs up.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
3 of 4 people (75%) found this review helpful
1.3 hrs on record
Posted: February 13
Platformers really need a unique hook to do well these days, and Snapshot certainly comes through on that front. Your little robot dude can take pictures of the world that save the items he snaps in them. He can then load the picture back into reality, rotating it to fit whatever the situation calls for. Pictures also capture motion, so if you snap a flying crate, it'll still be speeding through the air when you bring it back. Add in 120 levels to puzzle through, along with stars to collect and hidden objects to find, and you've got a quality mix, right?

You would, if the levels weren't designed by a sadist. Snapshot has one massive flaw, and it's the level design. Not five levels in, you'll start encountering death spikes that force you to start the whole level over. There are no lives and no checkpoints, so even on the larger sprawling levels, one misstep can cost you a lot of time. Worse than that, many of the puzzles in the game can be rendered impossible to solve, forcing a restart of the level. This is because many levels like to make you stack objects to scale tall walls or shafts, and then continue using those items later in the level. Of course, if you fall back down after moving your items to the top, there's no way to get them back. The very first level involving springs is very easy to ruin if you do any exploring whatsoever.

I want to say it's a shame, but honestly all Snapshot has going for it is the picture gimmick. The graphics are clean and cute but nothing special. There's no story to speak of, or if there is it's locked behind dozens of aggravating levels. Really, puzzle platformers come down to their level design, and if it's crap, nothing can save it. Surely there's already another platformer out there that uses the same or a similar system to greater effect. And even if there isn't, Snapshot certainly isn't worth braving just for that.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
22 of 24 people (92%) found this review helpful
4.8 hrs on record
Posted: December 17, 2013
Overlooked little puzzle platformer game. Now, I know the genre is kind of saturated and there's a lot of stuff going on when it comes to this type of games. Snapshot manages to be unique with simple but nice graphics, nicely scaling challenge, lots of stuff to do. It is definitely best idea to play this in small doses, like one set of levels per day, you just can't grind it unless you are hardcore. And somehow that's how it actually keeps you playing which gives it a good life cycle. Give it a shot every now and then when you are bored and someday you will finish it. There is no hurry. Just a few minutes for Snapshot. Again and again. Truly nice execution.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
25 of 30 people (83%) found this review helpful
14.6 hrs on record
Posted: October 1, 2014
Unlike the other Kyle Pulver game I've played, Offspring Fling, which I absolutely loved, I can't say the same for Snapshot. A unique and interesting concept quickly tires itself out and becomes bland and repetitive.

With around 120 levels it's a game that really overstays its welcome. Each set of three levels introduces a gimmicky twist to the gameplay- I feel safe with saying gimmick because all but the most fundamental of them are promptly thrown out the window and never seen again. There is no cohesiveness to the design that brings all these scattershot elements together into something greater. A lot of them are poorly implemented, frustrating to use, or just plain boring anyway- if you do happen to find a mechanic you like, you'll probably never see it again.

A broader problem is that it's supposed to be a puzzle game, but has failed to puzzle me in any way. I've rarely been stumped on how to approach a problem; instead it all seems kind of obvious.The only real difficulty I've had in finishing a level is from frustrating deaths due to a combination of insta-kill falls/spikes, the poor mechanics mentioned above, and the lack of checkpoints in levels. A lot of the levels take far too long and offer far too much room for mistakes to not include any sort of checkpoint. I wouldn't speak too highly of the level design itself either.

Unless it's something you're receiving in a bundle of some sort and just want to try out for a little bit, I cannot recommend Snapshot at all. A lot of potential seems wasted with such a unique core mechanic behind it. It is an exercise in frustration rather than problem solving; repetiveness rather than innovation.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny
16 of 19 people (84%) found this review helpful
Posted: August 17, 2013
A pretty simple casual platforming game.

Has interesting mechanics and it's definitely fun. There are a lot of levels to play and it scales very well. Hard to achieve perfect scores on all levels. Nice art style and soundtrack. Not a bad game in the slightest.

Good when bored.
Was this review helpful? Yes No Funny